The Robin Simpson Collection of Commemoratives
on Wednesday 8th September 2021

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1.      CHARLES II
A Delft charger, late 19th/20th century, painted in blue with a scene depicting the Boscobel Oak with the King's head emerging from the foliage, three soldiers and buildings with spires in the background, within a border of scrolling flowers and foliage, broken and restored, 32.7cm.

In the final battle of the Civil War, fought at Worcester on 3rd September 1651, Charles II's army was well and truly overwhelmed by Cromwell's New Model Army. Charles escaped a Parliamentary patrol by hiding in an oak tree in the grounds of Boscobel House.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson Antiques, September 1996.
£120-180
2.      WILLIAM AND MARY
A London delftware Royal blue dash charger, c.1690, painted in blue, yellow and manganese with full-length portraits of the Royal couple flanked by tents, beneath the initials 'WMR', the rim with a blue dash border, the underside with a pale blue lead glaze, a short hairline to the rim, 32.8cm.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, June 2016.

£3000-4000
3.      WILLIAM AND MARY
A large Delft charger, c.1690, painted in blue with crowned half-length portraits of William and Mary inscribed 'KWD3 MSKIV GBT', the rim with a border of birds, flowers and foliage, broken and repaired, 38.5cm.

The initialled inscription translates as 'King William the Third, Mary Stuart Queen of Great Britain'.

Illustrated: Grosvenor House Antiques Fair exhibition catalogue, 'A Tribute to the Age of William and Mary', London, June 1989, front cover.
£1200-1500
4.      QUEEN MARY II
A Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1688-94, the spherical body moulded with a portrait oval inscribed 'MARIA D.G. MAG. BRIT. FRANC. ET HIB. REGINA &' , flanked by scrolling flower stems highlighted in blue and reserved on a manganese ground, a rim crack, 17cm.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, February 1997.

£500-800
5.      WILLIAM III
A Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1695, the globular body of a pale grey tone, applied with an octagonal portrait medallion inscribed 'WILHELMVS III D.G. MAG BRIT. FRANC. ET. HIB. REX.', flanked by stylized scrolling flowers, a short crack to the foot and base, 12.5cm.
£400-600
6.      WILLIAM III
A Delft charger, c.1690-95, painted in manganese and yellow with a three-quarter length portrait initialled PWD3, the wide rim with a wash border incised with stylized flower scrolls, the reverse with a buff lead glaze, restored cracks to the rim, 34.7cm.
£1200-1800
7.      QUEEN ANNE
A London delftware plate, c.1702-14, painted in blue with a half-length crowned portrait flanked by the initials 'AR', within a banded and looped border, extensively restored, 22cm.

Provenance: sold Christie's, 27th April 1998, lot 4.

£2500-3000
8.      QUEEN ANNE
A large Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1702-10, applied with a roundel bearing the crowned initials AR for Queen Anne within a narrow laurel wreath, within incised and sprigged foliate and floral scrolls on a blue ground, cracked, the base probably broken out and restuck, 23.4cm. £1000-1500
9.      DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH
A small delftware blue dash charger, c.1710, probably Bristol, painted in blue, yellow and green with a standing figure of the duke in armour holding a baton, between the initials 'DM' and flanked by sponged trees, the rim with a blue dash border, restored, 29.4cm.

John Churchill, born in 1650, was a statesman renowned for his organisational, logistic and diplomatic skills. He was appointed Captain General of the British Army and raised to the Dukedom in 1702. He died in 1722. Cf. Anthony Ray, English Delftware in The Robert Hall Warren Collection Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, pl 2, for a similar example. The same portrait was also used to represent Prince George of Denmark, the Duke of Ormonde, Prince Eugene, George I and George II, the initials identifying the figure.

Provenance: ex Beaumont collection; Vogel collection, sold Sotheby's, New York, 19th January 2019, lot 672.




£2000-3000
10.     1716 QUEEN ANNE IN MEMORIAM
A delftware plate, dated 1716, painted in blue with the inscription 'To the Pious Memory of Queen Anne '1716', within a foliate wreath border, restored rim sections, 22.2cm.

Dated two years after Queen Anne's death in 1714, this inscription has its roots in high-Tory support and anti-Jacobite sentiment and propaganda. Cf. Lipski and Archer, Dated English Delftware, p.76, nos. 289 and 290 for similar examples dated 1717.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, November 2000.
£2000-3000
11.     GEORGE I
A London delftware 'Union' plate, c.1714, probably Vauxhall, painted in red, green and blue with crossed thistle and rose stems surmounted by a crown and the initials 'GR' within a blue lined border, a long rim crack, 21.1cm.

The crossed thistle and rose motif first appeared on AR plates for Queen Anne to celebrate the Act of Union of 1707. Cf. Frank Britton, London Delftware, p.142, fig.119.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson, November 1999.

£2000-2500
12.     GEORGE I
A London delftware plate, c.1714-27, painted in blue, green and red with a half-length crowned portrait flanked by the initials 'GR', within narrow blue and red bands, broken and restored, 22.2cm.

While it is likely that this plate commemorates George I, the same portrait was used by potters to commemorate the Coronation of George II in 1727.

Provenance: with John Howard, June 2015.
£1500-2000
13.     BRISTOL ELECTION OF THOMAS COSTER
A Bristol delftware plate, c.1734, painted in blue with a figure of Justice overcoming Envy, depicted as a tortured figure holding a paper entitled 'The Petition', beneath an arch inscribed 'Libertas Populi' and the initials 'TC', within a border of barbed floral panels and scrolls, repaired rim sections, 22.1cm.

In the 1734 general election Thomas Coster, a vigorous opponent of Walpole's Excise schemes, was returned for the Tories against the Whigs, Sir Abraham Elton and Mr Scrope, for Bristol. Coster's election was, however, contested and a petition was presented to the House of Commons by the Mayor of the Corporation, alleging invalid votes. Much of one sitting of the House was taken up hearing the matter, notwithstanding which the petition was subsequently withdrawn. Coster died in 1739.

Provenance: sold Sotheby's 21st July 1981, lot 40; subsequently with Jonathan Horne and ex Longridge Collection, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 3 November 2011, lot 336.

£2000-3000
14.     BATTLE OF PORTOBELLO
A Liverpool delftware plate, c.1740, finely painted in pale blue with a scene of warships engaged in the bombardment of the fort, the rim with a formal grapevine border, extensively broken and restuck, 26.9cm.

In the conflict between the English and Spanish in the Caribbean that became known as 'The War of Jenkins Ear', and following earlier failed British blockade attempts, Vice-Admiral Edward Vernon, against much criticism and with a squadron of just six ships, appeared off Portobello on 20th November 1739. With the wind from the east, Vernon attacked the Castillo del Hierro and the English scaled the walls of the fort. The Spanish surrendered, the English occupied and destroyed much of the town before withdrawing after three weeks, thus ending the town's main function as a Spanish maritime base. Vernon's popularity was short-lived, however, following his later failed attempt to take the fortress at Cartagena. Suffering heavy British casualties in Cuba, he returned to England in 1742 disgraced.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 2000.
£1000-1500
15.     ADMIRAL VERNON AND THE BATTLE OF PORTOBELLO
A small European-decorated Chinese porcelain bowl, c.1740, originally decorated with a pagoda island landscape in underglaze blue, later enamelled in London, the interior with a scene of the Admiral holding a baton, with two ships in the background, within a porthole border with flags, spears, cannon and drums, the exterior with sailing vessels, small figures and enamel detailing, a small rim chip, minor footrim chipping, 11.2cm diameter.

See footnote to lot 14.

Provenance: the Watney Collection of Dutch and English Decorated Chinese Porcelain, Bonhams, 7th November 2003, lot 51.

£1000-1500
16.     1746 DUKE OF CUMBERLAND AND CULLODEN
A large Chinese export porcelain mug, mid 18th century, brightly painted with a half-length portrait of the Duke within a circular gilded border inscribed 'In Remembrance of the Glorious Victory at Culloden Apl. 16th 1746', flanked by floral and foliate sprays, the rim with a gilt spearhead border, a large glaze crack, 15.5cm.

William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland was the second son of George III. He commanded the British forces that vanquished Charles Edward Stuart at Culloden, three miles east of Inverness. Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.110, where the author attributes the portrait to be after that by John Wootton of 1744.

Provenance: with Cohen & Cohen, October 2017 together with a Certificate of BADA.
£2000-3000
17.     GEORGE II
A Battersea enamel oval portrait plaque, c.1755, engraved by Ravenet and printed in manganese with a Classical head in profile, titled 'GEORGIUS. II. REX.', within a gilded metal frame, restored, 10cm overall.
£300-400
18.     DUKE OF CUMBERLAND
A Battersea enamel oval plaque, c.1755-60, engraved by Ravenet and printed in puce with a head and shoulders profile, wearing an armour breastplate and ermine-lined robes, within a gilt metal frame, faint cracking, 10.2cm overall.

See footnote to lot 16.

Cf. Therle and Bernard Hughes, English Painted Enamels, p.18, fig. 2, page 18. Sold Bonhams, 10th June 2005, lot 81.

£400-600
19.     FREDERICK PRINCE OF WALES
A good Battersea enamel oval portrait plaque, c.1755, engraved by Ravenet and printed in puce with head and shoulders profile, wearing armour pinned with the Garter Star, within a gilt metal frame, 10.2cm overall.

The Prince of Wales died on 31st March 1751. Cf. Egan Mew, Battersea Enamels, figure 3, for a similar plaque from the Schreiber collection.

Provenance: sold Phillips, 6th June 2001, lot 212.
£500-800
20.     CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER
A Battersea oval enamel plaque, c.1753-56, printed in pale manganese with a half-length portrait of a Chancellor of the Exchequer in full wig, lace cravat and elaborate embroidered jacket, the plaque 8.5cm high, in a modern frame.

The identity of the subject is discussed by Bernard Watney, 'The Chancellor on a Battersea Enamel', ECC Trans Vol 7, pt 1 (1968). W B Honey suggested that the print was the work of two hands, the head by Ravenet and the costume by Hancock. See The Connoisseur, Vol LXXIV, 1932. Watney concluded that the subject was perhaps Henry Pelham after an engraving by John Hinton; however, more recent suggestion has been made that the likeness more closely resembles Henry Boyle, 1st Earl of Shannon and Speaker of the Irish House of Commons from 1733 to 1753, as depicted in a mezzotint engraved by John Brooks and sold by Thomas Jefferys and William Herbert.

Provenance: sold (as Henry Pelham) Phillips, 6th June 2001, lot 210.
£500-800
21.     LORD BLAKENEY
A rare English rectangular enamel plaque, c.1756-61, painted with a monk holding a lantern over an oval portrait, titled 'Ld. Blakeney' on the plinth beneath, mounted in a gilt metal frame, 9.2cm overall.

William Blakeney was Member of Parliament for Kilmallock from 1725 to 1757. He took part in the War of Jenkins Ear (see lot 14), being appointed Brigadier-General. Following the disastrous campaign in the West Indies he returned to Britain and was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Stirling Castle in 1742. After the Battle of Culloden (see lot 16) he was promoted Lieutenant General and given command of the Highlands. In 1748 he was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Menorca. During the early part of the Seven Years War, and despite gallant efforts to defend the island, Blakeney surrendered on 29th June 1756, the Garrison being given free passage to Gibraltar. Absolved of any blame for the defeat, Blakeney was raised to the Irish Peerage the same year and retired from military service to Ireland where he died on 20th September 1761. He is buried in the nave of Westminster Abbey. A print published in 1756, engraved by James McArdell after George Chalmers was inspiration for this plaque. Cf. Bernard Watney, EEC Trans, vol 9, part 3, plate 171.

Provenance: sold Bonhams, 18th April 2012, lot 97.
£800-1200
22.     FREDERICK THE GREAT
A Staffordshire salt-glazed stoneware teapot and cover, c.1758, the squat globular body painted in coloured enamels with a head and shoulders profile inscribed 'Fred. III Prufsiae Rex' [sic], the reverse with the crowned Prussian eagle above the ribboned inscription 'Semper Sublimis', each within a scrolling cartouche reserved on an ermine ground, a restuck chip to the cover, 18.5cm across. (2)

Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, was the great nephew of George I. Following the Westminster Convention of January 1756, he enjoyed the support of the English. An accomplished military strategist, he was eventually victorious in the Seven Years War of 1756 to 1763 leading to the power of Prussia in Europe.

Provenance: sold Sotheby's, 15th April 1997, lot 161.

£800-1200
23.     MARINE SOCIETY
A rare Worcester slop bowl, c.1760, printed in black with four vignettes including a naval engagement, Britannia and inscribed figural scenes of sailors and their families on the exterior, the interior with a heavily worn print of George II, some wear, minor footrim chips, 15.4cm dia.

Established in 1756 by Jonas Hanway, the Marine Society offered Naval training to less fortunate boys to equip them to crew on the King's ships and develop a respected career. Cf. National Maritime Museum 'A Celebration of the Sea' by Rina Prentice, page 56. Sold Christie's, South Kensington, 26th September 1996, lot 94.
£400-600
24.     FREDERICK THE GREAT
A small Worcester mug, c.1760, the cylindrical body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a half length portrait titled 'King of Prussia', with a winged figure of Fame, centred by military trophies and flags each inscribed with battle honours, signed with RH monogram and anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, a filled chip to the rim, 8.6cm.

See footnote to lot 22 and Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.116.
£200-300
25.     ADMIRAL BOSCAWEN AND THE CAPTURE OF LOUISBOURG
A rare Worcester mug, c.1760, the cylindrical body printed in black with a three-quarter length portrait of the Admiral holding a chart titled 'Louisbourg', the reverse with two warships, centred by the arms of Boscawen, 8.7cm.

This portrait of Admiral Edward Boscawen is after the 1747 painting by John Faber, but has been embellished with the inscribed map of Cape Breton. Highly regarded as a fighting Admiral, Boscawen was wounded in the neck in 1747 in action off Cape Finisterre thus earning him the nickname 'Wrynecked Dick'. Boscawen took Louisbourg at the mouth of the St Lawrence River in July 1758, paving the way for the assault on Quebec the following year. Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, number 8.


£800-1200
26.     GEORGE II
A small Worcester mug, c.1760, the baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a portrait of George II, the reverse with a ship, trophies of war and a putto holding aloft the cap of liberty surmounted by the crown, signed with RH monogram, inscribed 'Worcester' and with anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, 8.6cm.

Among the notable British victories of the 'Annus Mirabilis' of 1759 was that of Quebec during the Seven Years War. It thwarted France's ambitious plans of advancement, coming as it did towards the end of George II's reign and his death on 25th October 1760. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.9.

Provenance: with Roderick Jellicoe, August 1993.

£400-600
27.     WILLIAM PITT (THE ELDER)
A good Worcester cylindrical porcelain mug, c.1760, printed in black with a half-length portrait of Pitt after the portrait by William Hoare, flanked by vignettes of Minerva and Fame, 8.8cm.

William Pitt 'The Elder' was born in 1708. Between 1756 and 1761 (other than a brief period in 1757) he was leader of the House. He was single minded in his determination for victory in the Seven Years War, which coincided with this period. Raised to the Peerage as Earl of Chatham in 1766 he became Britain's oldest Prime Minster from 1768 until his death in 1778. £800-1200
28.     GENERAL JAMES WOLFE
A rare Worcester cylindrical mug, c.1760, printed in black with a half-length portrait flanked by prints of Mars and Fame, a putto above with a laurel diadem, 12cm.

Following the success at Louisburg in the Seven Years War, William Pitt made Wolfe commander of the force that sailed up the St Lawrence River. On 13th September 1759, in a surprise attack, he took Quebec from the French. Mortally wounded by three musket shots he survived long enough to learn of victory, one that was to lead to the collapse of French power in the new world. For this Wolfe was accorded lasting fame in history.

Provenance: ex Pares Wilson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th Sep 2009, Lot 91; and G W Capell Collection, sold Sotheby's, 16th February 1965, Lot 91. Cyril Cook, Life and Work of Robert Hancock, Item 120.
£1500-2000
29.     1760 ACCESSION OF GEORGE III
A rare Longton Hall mug, c.1760, the baluster body printed in black by John Sadler of Liverpool with a half-length portrait of the new monarch, flanked by foliate sprigs and the ribboned inscription 'George III King of Great Britain', signed 'J. Sadler Liverp.', a long rim crack, 10.1cm,

Provenance: with Simon Spero, September 2001; formerly E & J (Joseph) Handley Collection, Carmel, California. Paper label for the Betchworth Collection.
£1000-1500
30.     GEORGE III
A London delftware plate, c.1760, well painted in blue with a head and shoulders profile portrait of the king pinned with the Garter Star, inscribed 'GR III', three filled rim chips, 22cm.

Cf. J C Austin, British Delft at Williamsburg, p.140, no.190. It is likely that the portrait by Jeremiah Meyer is the source for this portrait. The existence of a companion plate depicting Queen Charlotte Sophia of Mecklenburg-Strelitz suggests these plates were made at the time of their marriage in 1761.

Provenance: with John Howard, April 2018.
£2500-3000
31.     PRINCE FERDINAND OF BRUNSWICK
A rare Longton Hall porcelain mug, c.1760, printed in black with a portrait titled 'The Illustrious Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick', flanked by vignettes of military trophies inscribed 'Minden', and a battle scene, a rim crack and filled rim chip, 9.8cm.

At the Battle of Minden on 1st August 1759, Field Marshall Ferdinand of Brunswick won a decisive victory against the French, thus ending the imminent threat to Hanover. For this he was awarded the Order of the Garter by George II and a vote of thanks by the British Parliament.

Provenance: Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 6 and ex Frank Arnold collection.


£1000-1500
32.     GEORGE III
A very rare small Worcester mug, c.1761, the baluster body printed in purple with a half-length profile portrait of the monarch looking to dexter, wearing an elaborate jacket pinned with the Garter Star, flanked by a vignettes of Britannia and Fame, a long restored crack and filled rim chip, 8.6cm.

Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 4 for a similar mug.
£400-600
33.     MARQUESS OF GRANBY
A large Worcester mug, c.1761, the baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a portrait of Granby flanked by vignettes of Fame and Mars, a putto in flight above with a diadem of laurels, 15cm.

This engraving was adapted by Hancock from one by Richard Houston published in 1760 and after a portrait by Joshua Reynolds. General John Manners, Marquess of Granby, commanded the British contingent fighting under the Duke of Brunswick against the French from 1759 until the end of the Seven Years War, including the Battles of Minden and Warburg. At the latter, a corps of 20,000 French was routed. In the charge Granby lost his hat and wig, hence this depiction bald-headed. This was an incident that caused much amusement in the ranks and led to the expression 'Going at it bald-headed'!

Provenance: formerly the Joseph M. Handley Collection. Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 7.

£800-1200
34.     MARQUESS OF GRANBY
A Wedgwood creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, the globular body printed in black by Sadler with a named head and shoulders portrait flanked by military trophies, the reverse with a scene of two cavalrymen engaged in combat within a scrolling cartouche and military trophies, restoration to the end of the spout, 16.5cm across. (2)

Granby sat for Sir Joshua Reynolds no fewer than twelve times; in turn, Francois-Germain Aliamet engraved a plate which was used by Sadler. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 406 and 407.
£800-1200
35.     QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Wedgwood creamware teapot and cover, c.1762, the globular body printed in black by Sadler with a named head and shoulders profile of the queen, the reverse with a small oval medallion with superimposed named portraits surmounted by a crown and royal trophies, restoration to the end of the spout, the cover cracked, 15.5cm across. (2)

This profile of Queen Charlotte is taken from the portrait by Jeremiah Mayer, engraved by Francois-Germain Aliamet. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 393, 395 and 396.

Provenance: ex Kanter Collection, sold Skinners of Boston, Massachusetts, 31st May 1997, lot 70. £800-1200
36.     1761 MARRIAGE AND CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Staffordshire redware teapot and cover, c.1761, the squat cylindrical body applied with the crowned couple holding hands surmounted by the initials 'GR' and flanked by full-length hatted figures, restoration to the cover, 15cm across. (2)

Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.027 for a moulding of George and Charlotte holding hands.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 2003.

£600-1000
37.     1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, moulded with the Royal couple crowned and seated beneath putti, painted in coloured enamels, the cover heavily restored, 18cm across. (2)
£600-800
38.     1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, the globular body moulded with crowned heads of the new monarchs, the reverse with an exotic bird, each flanked by scrolling foliage, decorated in broad stripes of green and yellow, extensively restored, 17.7cm across. (2)
£400-600
39.     1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware tea canister, c.1761, the chamfered rectangular body moulded with crowned half-length portraits of the Royal couple, painted in brightly coloured enamels, the shoulders painted with floral sprays, the cover lacking, the base broken out and restored, 11.5cm. £600-800
40.     GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A pearlware tea canister and cover, c.1762-65, the flattened hexagonal body moulded to two sides with half-length portraits of the Royal couple, painted in brightly coloured enamels, the shorter sides painted with floral spays, inscribed 'Ann Wright' in black beneath the neck, a crack around the base, rim and cover restored, 18.6cm.

Charlotte's portrait is after the engraving by Thomas Frye dated 1762. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.18.
£600-800
41.     1766 ACESSION OF CHARLES III, JACOBITE KING OF BRITAIN
An important Staffordshire salt-glazed stoneware teapot and cover, c.1766, the globular body decorated in opaque white enamel with rose flowers, buds and leaves on a rich blue ground, inscribed 'C*R III', with crabstock handle and spout, minor faults, 20.7cm across. (2)

Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender) was Catholic, the eldest son of James Francis Stuart (the Old Pretender) and grandson of James II of England (1633-1701) who succeeded to the throne upon the death of his brother Charles II in 1685. In the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the Protestant William III and Mary took the crown of Britain, leaving James II to escape to France. On 1st January 1766 James Francis Stuart died, leaving Charles Edward Stuart to claim the British crown as Charles III in exile, as part of the Jacobite succession. This teapot is believed to be one of only two known examples, the other being in the British Museum (No. 1938,0218.1.CR).

Provenance: ex Byrom family collection, sold Lyon and Turnbull, 14th May 2015, lot 61. The Byrom family from the North of England were notable Jacobite supporters, forming a collection of associated relics.
£5000-8000
42.     1763 CIDER ACT
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1763-66, the ovoid body painted in black with the inscription 'No Cyder Act', the reverse with 'Apples at Liberty' within red scrolling cartouches, incised with a trellis band, set with crabstock spout and double strap handle, the cover with a floral knop, 16.6cm across. (2)

To pay for the ever-mounting cost of the Seven Years War, Lord Bute introduced the Cider Bill in 1763. Such was its unpopularity, especially in the West Country, that he was forced to resign later that same year in favour George Grenville. Grenville was successful in defeating an opposition motion to repeal the bill the following year, however it was finally repealed in 1766. This style of painting is often associated with the workshops of Robinson and Rhodes of Leeds but recent excavations in Staffordshire have produced similar styles of painting to that of the Leeds workshop.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, March 2007, item 07/36 in their catalogue.

£2000-2500
43.     JOHN WILKES
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1763-65, probably Leeds, the globular body inscribed in black with 'Wilkes & Liberty', the reverse with 'No. 45', each inscription within a red and black scrolling cartouche, with moulded spout and scroll handle, restoration, 19.5cm across. (2)

John Wilkes (1725-1797) was a radical English politician who represented the seat of Aylesbury. Also a journalist, his criticism of the King's opening of Parliament speech in issue 45 of his magazine 'The North Briton' earned him a warrant for his arrest for libel in 1763. Citing parliamentary privilege, he was cleared of the charge and went on to become Lord Mayor of London in 1774.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, June 2007.
£1500-2000
44.     JOHN WILKES
A creamware mug, c.1763-65, probably Leeds, the cylindrical body painted in black with the inscription 'Wilkes and Liberty No.45' within a red and black scrolling cartouche, extensively restored, 9.8cm high.

See footnote to lot 43. £800-1200
45.     JOHN WILKES AND LORD MANSFIELD
A Chinese export porcelain punchbowl, c.1765-70, painted to two sides with a portrait cartouche of Wilkes flanked by figures representing Sergeant Glyn and Earl Temple above the ribboned inscription 'Always Ready in a Good Cause', and a cartouche of Mansfield flanked by Lord Bute and the Devil above the inscription 'Justice Sins Pitie', the rim inscribed in black 'Wilkes & Liberty', broken and restored, 25.7cm dia.

In February 1764 Wilkes was convicted in absentia for seditious and blasphemous libel before Lord Mansfield in King's Bench, despite the whole case being littered with contention. Glyn appeared for the defence and Temple was Wilkes' patron; Bute had served as Prime Minister until retiring in 1763. Refusing to return to England for sentence, Wilkes was outlawed. Such was the public interest in the case that engraved satires were copied onto Chinese wares. Cf. Osgoode Hall Law Journal, (volume 25 number 3) III. Wilkes and the Judges: 1763-1768 also Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.491.

Provenance: ex Rouse collection, sold Sotheby's, Billingshurst, 10th March 1999, lot 82.
£1000-1500
46.     JOHN WILKES
A Derby figure of the politician and journalist, c.1775, standing and resting one hand on a square plinth, atop of which rests a scroll inscribed 'Bill of Rights', draped in a long pink cloak, a putto to his right, holding a Phrygian cap on the end of a stick and supporting a book titled 'Lock [sic] on Gov't', raised on a scrolled base, minor faults, the putto's right foot restuck, 30.8cm.

Provenance: with Stockspring Antiques, June 2015.
£500-800
47.     GEORGE II IN MEMORIAM
A tall Worcester porcelain vase, c.1770, the slender baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with an equestrian portrait of George II above trophies of war, flanked by large and small versions of 'Les Garçons Chinois' and prints of ships at sail, signed 'RH Worcester' with anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, a few small footrim chips, 27cm.

This equestrian portrait of George II was painted by David Morier in about 1745 following the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, the last occasion on which a reigning British Monarch led troops into battle. Simon Francois Ravenet took an engraving of the painting from which Hancock took this study. Cf. Bonhams, The Norman Stretton Collection, 21st February 2001, lot 71.

Provenance: ex J.A. Harrison and Sir Jeremy Lever collections, sold Bonhams, 7th March 2007, lot 234.
£1000-1500
48.     WILLIAM PITT (THE ELDER)
A creamware mug, c.1765, probably Wedgwood, the slight baluster body printed in black with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'The Right Hon. Willm. Pitt Esq' on a scroll banner, with moulded scroll handle, restoration to the rim and foot, 11.1cm.

Pitt was leader of the House from 1757 until his resignation in October 1761; during which time Britain triumphed in the Seven Years War. Returning to power in July 1766, Pitt appointed himself Lord Privy Seal and in so doing was raised on 4th August to the peerage as Earl of Chatham. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.150, pl.401 where the author attributes these mugs to Wedgwood with the prints by John Sadler, engraved by Billinge.

£500-800
49.     GEORGE III
A creamware jug, c.1775, the slight baluster body painted in red and black by David Rhodes of Leeds with a profile of George III looking to dexter, the reverse with a floral spray, with grooved double strap handle issuing from floral terminals, a rim crack, the spout restored, 16.8cm.

Cf. Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 524 for a mug with similar decoration.
£600-1000
50.     QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, late 18th/19th century, applied in white with a head and shoulders profile on a blue ground, velvet overmount within a glazed polished wood frame, 21.2cm.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.96, plate c where the authors note that this version was re-modelled by Hackwood in 1776.
£300-400
51.     SIR WILLIAM HAMILTON
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1776, modelled by Joachim Smith, applied in white on a blue ground with a head and shoulders profile, impressed on the front 'S. W. Hamilton', by repute with an impressed Wedgwood & Bentley mark, the plaque 10.2cm high, mounted in a later frame.

Hamilton was ambassador to the Court of Naples 1764 to 1800. An ardent collector of Greek and Roman antiquities, he sold his collection to the British Museum. The Barberini Vase which passed through his hands to become the property of the Duchess of Portland was also copied by Josiah Wedgwood with whom he corresponded. After the death of his first wife, he married Emma Lyon (known latterly as Hart) on 6th September 1791. She became the subject of Horatio Nelson's affections following the death of her husband in 1803. Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.182, plate b.

Provenance: Bonhams, 6th June 2007, lot 137 where the catalogue entry stated impressed 'Wedgwood & Bentley' in upper case.
" £500-800
52.     WILLIAM PITT (THE ELDER): EARL OF CHATHAM
A Wedgwood & Bentley jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1778, modelled by John Flaxman, applied in white on a blue ground with a head and shoulders profile, impressed 'Chatham', the reverse 'Wedgwood & Bentley', circa 1778, gilt metal rim, the plaque 8.6cm.

Pitt died on 11th May 1778. Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.99, plate a.

Provenance: Bonhams, 6th June 2007, lot 142. Paper label for the Rose-Ellis collection.

£600-800
53.     HEROES OF THE AMERICAN WARS OF INDEPENDENCE
A set of six oval enamel plaques, c.1780, printed in manganese with named portraits, variously titled 'Gen. Clinton', 'Genl. Elliot', 'Capt. Farmer', 'Lord Hood', 'Adml. Rodney' and 'Prince Willm. Henry', each within a simple metal frame with hanging eye, faint cracking to some, each 8.2cm overall. (6)

Henry Clinton was Commander-in-Chief of North America from 1778 to 1782. George Augustus Elliot was appointed Governor of Gibraltar in 1777 and promoted to General in 1778: the island was besieged by the French and Spanish between 1779 until 1783. George Farmer perished as Captain of the Quebec in the action off Ushant (western France) on 6th October 1779. Samuel Hood sailed for the West Indies at the end of 1780. George Brydges Rodney was ordered to the West Indies in late 1779 by way of Gibraltar where, in January 1780, he defeated the Spanish at the Battle of St Vincent. Prince William (later King William IV) was present at the Battle of St Vincent and subsequently served in New York where a plot to kidnap him was foiled. This likeness is taken from the engraving, published 1st February 1780 by Valentine Green, after the painting by Benjamin West.
£2500-3000
54.     ADMIRAL KEPPEL
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, late 18th/19th century, applied in white on a pale blue ground with a head and shoulders profile, by repute incised 'Keppel' and impressed 'Wedgwood' on the reverse, the plaque 9.6cm, mounted in a later frame.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.206, plate b.
£300-500
55.     ADMIRAL KEPPEL
A delftware plate, c.1780, probably London, painted in dark blue with a head and shoulders portrait within a formal foliate border, the rim inscribed in manganese with 'Admiral Keppel for Ever', heavily restored, 22.9cm.

The image derives from a print by T. Cook after D. Dodd, and is loosely based on the portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds. Cf. Michael Archer, Delftware, p.123, fig B.14.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, March 2003.

£500-800
56.     ADMIRAL KEPPEL
A William Greatbatch creamware teapot and cover, c.1780, the cylindrical body printed in black and decorated in coloured enamels with a portrait flanked by naval trophies and putti with trumpets, titled 'The Hon'ble. Aug'tus. Keppel', the reverse with a warship under full sail, restoration to the spout and handle, 18cm across. (2)

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.154, pls. 412 and 413.

Provenance: formerly Pugh Collection, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 26th April 2001, lot 59.
£800-1200
57.     ADMIRAL KEPPEL
A large Wedgwood creamware punch pot and cover, c.1780, printed in black by Sadler and Green with a portrait titled ' The Hon Aug's Keppel Admiral of the Blue', above trophies of war engraved by Billinge, the reverse inscribed 'May England never want a Keppel, A Man who never tarnished but ever added lustre to the British flag', within a cartouche embellished with classical figures including Neptune and Mars surmounted with a profile of George III, impressed mark, minor chipping, 29.7cm. (2)

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 414 and 415.

Provenance: ex Kanter collection, sold Skinner's of Boston, Massachusetts, 31st May 1997, lot 42. Paper label for Frances L Dixon.
£1000-1500
58.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A Staffordshire creamware teapot and cover, c.1780, the cylindrical body applied to each side with an oval portrait medallion within a cartouche impressed 'Admiral Rodney', flanked by green floral branches upon an orange ground, restored, 14.5cm across. (2)

Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.174
for a mug with similar decoration.
£150-250
59.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A large cylindrical creamware mug, c.1780, painted in iron red, purple and black with a portrait of the admiral in a tricorn hat, beneath the inscription 'Success to brave Rodney', restored, 15cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.156, pl. 422.
£200-300
60.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A tall Staffordshire creamware mug, c.1780, the cylindrical form applied with an oval profile portrait within a green cartouche titled 'Admiral Rodney', flanked by sprigged floral branches upon a faux tortoiseshell ground, some filled chips to the rim and foot, 15.6cm.

Provenance: with John Howard, November 2005.
£400-600
61.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A good Wedgwood creamware teapot and cover, c.1780, the globular body printed in black by Sadler and Green of Liverpool with a portrait inscribed 'Sr G Bridges Rodney Bt Rear Admiral of England', the reverse with a naval engagement, impressed mark, the cover likely associated, 20.7cm across. (2)

This portrait of Rodney was published on 1st April 1780 in the Westminster Magazine. The naval engagement is after the engraving by P C Panot, taken from the painting by R Paton titled 'The Defeat of the French off Belle Isle in November 1759'. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 417, 420 and 421 for such a commentary and the use of this naval engagement some twenty years later; the Norman Stretton collection, sold Phillips, 21st February 2001, lot 188 for a similar teapot and commentary.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, mid-2004.
£1000-1500
62.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A large and rare Staffordshire pearlware mug, c.1780, the cylindrical body applied with an oval portrait medallion of George Brydges Rodney beneath an elaborate ribbon impressed 'Success to G B Rodney', picked out in purple, green and blue and flanked by naïve depictions of warships under sail, 16cm.

Sailing for the West Indies in 1779, Rodney was ordered to relieve Gibraltar on the way. On 14th January 1780 at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent he defeated the Spanish, thus bringing some relief to Gibraltar. See lot 65 for a similar mug in Eliott's favour.
£600-800
63.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A small creamware figure of George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, c.1785, standing beside a pillar moulded with the name 'Rodney', his right hand reaching for his sword on his left hip, splashed in green and manganese, some restoration to the base, 14.6cm.

Provenance: with Martyn Edgell, July 2015.

£500-700
64.     ADMIRAL RODNEY
A Staffordshire pearlware mask jug of Admiral George Brydges Rodney, c.1795, depicted in uniform, the hat moulded with naval trophies and a flag beneath a repeated angular and motif border decorated in bright enamels, the handle formed from his plaited ponytail, minor faults, some staining, 16.1cm.

Rodney died in 1792. Given the more heavily potted nature of this piece it is likely to have been produced following his death, perhaps from an earlier mould. Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.179 where the author indicates a date of c.1780. £400-600
65.     GEORGE AUGUSTUS ELIOTT, 1ST BARON HEATHFIELD
A rare Staffordshire small pearlware mug, c.1780-83, the cylindrical body painted with the distinguished soldier holding a baton over a cannon, the reverse with figures in a Spanish gun boat, inscribed 'Elliot For Ever' [sic], some restoration, the handle replaced, 9cm.

See lot 62 for the companion mug but in Rodney's favour.
£200-300
66.     1782 GENERAL SIR GEORGE ELIOTT
A large pearlware punch pot and cover, dated 1782, painted in blue with the inscription 'Brave Elliot [sic] Gibraltar 1782' within a swagged cartouche, beside hops and bold flower sprays, the cover largely a replacement, the spout restored, 32cm.
£300-500
67.     GENERAL SIR GEORGE ELIOTT
A rare creamware oval plaque, c.1782-90, moulded in high relief and painted with a head and shoulders profile of the General in military uniform, a section broken off and restuck, 16.9cm.

Eliott was appointed Governor of Gibraltar in May 1777. The garrison came under siege in 1779, culminating in a grand attack by the French and Spanish, which commenced on 13th September 1782. However, the garrison held its position and by 6th February 1783 the siege was over.
£300-400
68.     IRISH VOLUNTEERS
A Wedgwood creamware jug, c.1780, printed in black by Sadler and Green with a cartouche containing the inscription 'Success to the Independent Volunteer Societies of the Kingdom of Ireland', flanked by Volunteers and surmounted by Hibernia, the reverse with 'The Death of Wolfe' after Benjamin West, faint impressed mark, filled chips to the footrim, 20.3cm.

As the war in America escalated to Europe, fear of invasion of England grew. To combat this, in 1779 British regular forces were withdrawn from Ireland and regiments of Volunteers were raised to defend the island. An engraving by W W Wollett, published on 1st January 1776 and taken from the 1770 painting by Benjamin West, was the basis of John Sadler's print of 'The Death of Wolfe'. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 403, 426 and 427. £600-800
69.     IRISH VOLUNTEERS
A Wedgwood creamware jug, c.1780, printed in black and decorated in colours with three infantrymen, the reverse with a cavalryman brandishing a sword, beneath the spout inscribed 'May they and their Commanders, Live happy many Years; Their King their Country's best Support, The Wexford Volunteers' above a cartouche inscribed 'Unanimity', impressed mark, small rim faults, a small footrim chip, 19.1cm.

See footnote to lot 68. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 428 and 429.

Provenance: ex Kanter collection; sold Skinner's of Boston, Massachusetts, 31st May 1997, lot 69. £1000-1500
70.     IRISH VOLUNTEERS
A Wedgwood creamware jug, c.1780, printed in black with three infantryman carrying bayonets, the reverse with a titled portrait of Admiral Rodney centred by a foliate cartouche inscribed 'Success to the Rathmelton Volunteers', faint impressed mark, restored chips to the rim and foot, 22cm.

See footnote to lot 68. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 417 and 428." £600-800
71.     AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE
A Wedgwood creamware jug, c.1780, printed in black to both sides with a variation of 'The Benefit of Neutrality', depicting a cow being ridden by Britannia while a Scotsman covers her eyes, a Frenchman and a Spaniard each clutching one of the cow's horns while a Dutchman milks her and an Englishman tugs at her tail, in the foreground a bulldog and a French greyhound squabble while a Dutch pug races off with a bone, impressed mark, some footrim chips, 22.3cm.

Illustrated: David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.411, p.153 for a discussion of this satirical print by C. Goodwin.

Provenance: the Kanter collection, sold by Skinner's of Boston, 31st May 1997, lot 69.

£800-1200
72.     BRITISH NAVAL ENGAGEMENT
A large Wedgwood creamware jug, c.1780, printed in black with two warships engaged in action above GR monogram flanked by trophies of war, the reverse with 'The Death of Wolfe' after Benjamin West, restoration to the rim, spout and foot, 28cm.

Rodney's heroic triumph over the Spanish on 14th January 1780 at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent, and the subsequent relief of Gibraltar, are probably the inspiration for the naval engagement depicted. The Sadler transfer of Wolfe's death at Quebec in 1759 after the painting by Benjamin West was also used by Wedgwood. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.150, pl. 403.

Provenance: with John May, May 1995.
£600-800
73.     SIR BANASTRE TARLETON
A small creamware jug, dated 1792, printed in black and painted in colours with a full-length portrait titled 'Colonel Tarleton', dressed in the uniform of the British Legion, the reverse with an equestrian portrait of the same subject, beneath the spout inscribed 'Henry & Mary Marsden 1792', some good restoration to the spout, 11cm.

Tarleton served with distinction under Cornwallis in 1776 aged just 22. Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1778, he destroyed American forces in Virginia and Carolina before returning to England in 1782 where he sat for Sir Joshua Reynolds, whose portrait was the inspiration for the full-length version depicted on this jug. Entering Parliament as member for Liverpool in 1790 he died in 1833 as a Baronet. Cf. David Drakard, English Printed Pottery, pp.158-159.

£150-250
74.     WILLIAM PITT THE YOUNGER AS CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER
A rare pearlware punch bowl, c.1782, printed in blue to the interior with a half-length portrait inscribed 'The Right Hon'ble William Pitt Esq'r Chancellor of the Exchequer', the exterior with Chinese pagoda landscapes, the rim with a Fitzhugh border, a hairline rim crack and small footrim chip, 24.6cm dia.

William Pitt was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer under the administration of Lord Shelburne in 1782; a position of which he was stripped upon the forming of the Fox North coalition the following year.
£500-800
75.     1783 CHARLES JAMES FOX AND LORD NORTH PARLIAMENTARY COALITION
A small and unusual enamel portrait plaque, c.1783, painted with a portrait of the faces of North and Fox combined, titled to the reverse 'Lord Nth & Chles Jms Fox Coalesed', the plaque 5cm, mounted in a wooden frame.

Lord North represented Banbury for the Tories from 1754 to 1790. He was Prime Minister from 1770 until he resigned in March 1782, following the failure of his American Colonies policy. He was replaced by the Marquess of Rockingham with Fox being appointed Foreign Secretary. Rockingham died unexpectedly on 1st July and the Earl of Shelburne became leader; however Fox refused to serve in this new administration thus splitting the Whig party. Although adversaries, Fox and North formed a coalition with the overwhelming support of North's Tories and Fox's opposition Whigs. Despite the King's reluctance, the coalition came to power on 2nd April 1783 in a Government nominally headed by the Duke of Portland and lasting until dissolved by the King in March 1784 following the failure of Fox's East India Bill.

Provenance: ex Shnayerson collection, sold 13th June 1999, lot 508B.

£800-1200
76.     WILLIAM PITT THE YOUNGER
A large pearlware punch bowl, c.1784, printed in blue to the interior with the inscription 'Success to Wm Pitt & God Save the King', the rim with a Fitzhugh border, the exterior with pagoda Chinese landscapes, raised on a circular foot, rim cracks, chipping to the foot, 27cm dia.

Following the fall of the Fox North Coalition in December 1783 (see lot 75) the King asked Pitt to form an administration, thus making him the youngest Prime Minister at the age of 24. Although losing a motion of no confidence in January 1784, Pitt refused to resign. Instead, with the King's backing, he built support. In the following March, Parliament was dissolved and, in the general election of 1784, Pitt secured a comfortable majority. £400-600
77.     PATRIOTIC SUPPORT FOR ADMIRALS RODNEY, HAWKE AND WOLFE
A pearlware punch bowl, c.1785-90, printed in blue to the interior with the inscription 'May all British Admirals have the Eye of an Hawke, the Heart of a Wolfe and the Spirit of a Rodney' within an oval cartouche, the exterior with small Chinese vignettes beneath a formal border, a small footrim chip and faint star crack, 26.1cm.

Rodney, Hawke and Wolfe were formidable commanders, enjoying the appreciation of the British population during the Seven Years War and the Wars of American Independence. Rodney's decisive victory at the Battle of the Saintes in 1782 was the last momentous event, Hawke having died in 1781. Rodney died in 1792 and Wolfe, the hero of Quebec, had fallen in 1759.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, June 2003.

£400-600
78.     ADMIRAL LORD HOOD
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1785, applied in white on a pale blue ground, with a head and shoulders profile modelled by John Charles Lochee, impressed mark, the plaque 10cm, mounted in a giltwood frame.

Samuel Hood saw action in the Seven Years War and held senior commands in the American Wars of Independence, subsequently becoming First Naval Lord. In 1784 he was elected member for Westminster together with Charles James Fox. He presided at the court martial of some of the surviving members of the Mutiny on the Bounty in 1792 and was raised to the Peerage as Viscount Hood of Whitley in 1796. He died in 1816.

Provenance: ex Kanter Collection sold Skinners of Boston, Massachusetts, 25th April 2003.


£500-800
79.     HENRY DUNDAS, 1ST VISCOUNT MELVILLE
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1785-90, applied in white on a deep blue ground with a head and shoulders profile, the plaque 9.8cm, mounted in a later wooden frame.

Dundas was a Scottish advocate and politician representing Midlothian from 1774 to 1790, then Edinburgh until 1802. He supported Pitt the Younger and was variously Home Secretary and Secretary of State for War until he retired in 1801. The following year he was raised to the Peerage as Viscount Melville becoming First Lord of the Admiralty 1804 to 1805. Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.239.

Provenance: with Leo Kaplan of New York, June 2000; then unframed and described as impressed Wedgwood on the reverse.
£300-400
80.     WILLIAM PITT THE YOUNGER
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1787, applied in white on a deep blue ground with a head in profile, impressed mark, the plaque 7.8cm, framed.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portraits Medallion, p.276, plate a, where the authors state that only one example has been located. £400-600
81.     WILLIAM PITT THE YOUNGER
A Wedgwood black basalt oval portrait plaque, c.1787, moulded in high relief with a head and shoulders likeness, impressed mark, 10.5cm.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions p.276, plate b.

£400-600
82.     HRH FREDERICK DUKE OF YORK
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1787-90, applied in white on a pale blue ground with a head in profile, impressed mark, a chip to the base of the plaque, the plaque 10.4cm, in an ebonised wood frame.

Cf. Reilly and Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.150 plate b where the authors attribute the modelling of this likeness to be by E Burch.
£250-350
83.     HRH PRINCE AUGUSTUS
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, late 18th/19th century, applied in white on a pale blue ground with a named head in profile modelled by Charles Lochee, by repute the reverse impressed 'Wedgwood', the plaque 7.6mm, mounted in later frame.

Augustus Frederick, the sixth son of George III, was born in 1773. Marrying in Rome in April 1793, the couple returned to England and were re-married in December the same year; on both occasions without the King's consent. The first marriage was annulled the following year but they continued to cohabit until 1801. Later that year the title Duke of Sussex was conferred upon him. He married again in 1831 and died in 1843. Cf. Reilly and Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.53.

Provenance: with Lindsay Grigsby of Pennsylvania in about 2002. Then described as the reverse being impressed Wedgwood.
£500-800
84.     SUPPORT FOR SMUGGLING AGAINST TAXATION
A rare pearlware jug, c.1787, the baluster body painted with a figure on horseback leading another horse laden with barrels, inscribed 'Success to the Smugler [sic]', the reverse with a spray of flowers beneath a banded neck picked out in puce, blue and green, some restoration to the rim and handle, 15cm.

With Britain having been at war for a quarter of a century, by 1784 William Pitt was faced with a massive national debt. The previous implementation of exorbitant taxes on tea and other imports was slowly reducing tax revenues. In reducing the levy, tax revenue began to rise as the smuggling of commodities became less profitable. The 1787 Hovering Act further attacked smuggling by extending the duties of customs officials to twelve miles offshore. £500-1000
85.     1788 VISIT TO WORCESTER BY GEORGE III
A good Flight Worcester jug, c.1788-90, painted by John Pennington with an en grisaille head and shoulders profile of the Monarch within a wide gilt circular border, flanked by foliage in green and gilt, the straight neck painted with repeated oak leaves and acorns within woven purple ribbon, a restored rim crack, 17.5cm.

George III and Queen Charlotte visited the City of Worcester between 6th and 8th August 1788, during which time they went to the Flight Worcester factory. The substantial orders placed and subsequent Royal warrant led to other significant commissions and greatly improved the factory's fortunes. £1000-1500
86.     GEORGE III, PRINCE OF WALES, WILLIAM PITT
A pearlware loving cup and cover, c.1789, the U-shaped bowl printed in dark blue with named portrait ovals of George III, Queen Charlotte, the Prince of Wales and William Pitt, between scattered flower sprays, the interior with a sailing vessel, with decorative border lined and decorated in tones of brown, raised on a low circular foot, a small chip to the cover, 19.8cm high. (2)

This is likely to commemorate the Regency Crisis, which evolved after the King declared Parliament prorogued from 25th September until 20th November 1788. During this time his mental health deteriorated and he was unable to deliver a speech at the impending state opening, rendering Parliament unable to proceed to any business. In the ensuing debate Charles James Fox argued that the Prince of Wales was automatically entitled to exercise sovereignty, whilst Prime Minister William Pitt conversely argued that, in the absence of any statute, the right to choose a Regent belonged to Parliament alone. In the interests of government, a compromise was reached, the constitutional detail fudged and the Lord Chancellor instructed to affix the great seal without the King's consent. Parliament opened on 3rd February 1789 with the Regency Bill being introduced but the King recovered before it could be passed.

£1200-1800
87.     1789 GEORGE III's RECOVERY
A small cylindrical creamware mug, dated 1789, printed in black with 'God Save the King' above a head in profile surrounded by royal trophies inscribed 'The Fountain of Honour' and dated March 17th 1789 above two lines of loyal verse, 9.4cm.

Cf. John and Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery, pl. 28.


£400-600
88.     1789 GEORGE III's RECOVERY
A small cylindrical creamware mug, c.1789, printed in black with a profile portrait inscribed 'George III King' above a four line stanza, the rim with a painted tassel border in green, puce and blue, some restoration, 9.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.164, pl. 443.
£400-600
89.     1789 GEORGE III'S RECOVERY
A large pearlware 'Fair Hebe' jug, after the design by John Voyez, one side modelled in high relief with a dog jumping up at his master before a banner impressed 'Long Live the King', the reverse with a couple and a bird's nest below a parchment inscribed 'GR III RESTOR'D', decorated in blue, green, yellow and manganese, restoration to the rim and handle, 21.5cm.

John Voyez, a Frenchman who had previously worked for Wedgwood, was in the employ of Ralph Wood II. His 1788 incarnation of this jug was in celebration of a bumper harvest, here with an alternative inscription for George III's recovery from madness. Cf. R K Henrywood, An Illustrated Guide to British Jugs, p.231 for similar examples. £250-350
90.     1789 GEORGE III'S RECOVERY
A pearlware puzzle jug, c.1789, the slender oviform body pierced around the rim, the handle modelled as Fame, moulded with acanthus leaves in pale blue and green and banded in brown with the incised inscription 'Fame doth her trumpet sound so you must drink all round to Great George the King', chipping and restoration, 23.3cm. £400-600
91.     1789 GEORGE III'S RECOVERY
Two pearlware bowls, c.1789, one printed in blue to the interior with a small inscribed vignette of Britannia holding a portrait of George III, the other with a similar larger vignette, the exteriors with Oriental figures and landscapes, damages and restoration, 23.5cm max. (2)
£100-200
92.     1789 GEORGE III'S RECOVERY
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1789, applied in white on a deep blue ground with a head in profile surmounted by a crown and the ribboned inscription 'HEALTH RESTORED', impressed mark, a small chip, wooden frame present but separate, the plaque 6.4cm.

Cf. Reilly and Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.167, version h(ii).
£300-400
93.     1789 GEORGE III'S RECOVERY
A Wedgwood jasperware oval plaque, c.1789, applied in white on a deep blue ground with an allegory of Fame inscribing a tablet 'Health is rest…', surmounted by a portrait bust of George III, the plaque 7.8cm, mounted in a later frame.

Provenance: with Aurea Carter, June 2007.
£300-400
94.     PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY (LATER DUKE OF CLARENACE AND WILLIAM IV)
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1789, applied in white on a dusky pink ground with a head and shoulders profile, the reverse indistinctly incised 'preserve (?) Will, Prince William', faint impressed mark, the plaque 7.6cm, framed.

Having served in the Navy in the Americas since 1780, William returned to Britain in April 1789 as a consequence of his father's madness. He was created Duke of Clarence and St. Albans by George III on 16th May so that he could not stand as the member of Parliament for Totnes - his political views being at odds with those of his father. Cf. Reilly and Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.341b where the authors attribute this likeness as having been modelled by Charles Lochee in 1787.
£300-400
95.     PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY (LATER WILLIAM IV)
A large and rare Ralph Wedgwood (Ferrybridge) creamware jug, c.1796-1801, printed in black with a half-length portrait inscribed 'THE ROYAL BRITISH TAR' with a loyal toast beneath, the reverse with two ships engaged in battle, impressed Wedgwood & Co mark, restoration to the spout and base, 21.1cm.

See footnote to lot 94. Although he left the Navy in 1790, Prince William was appointed an admiral (purely a nominal role) in 1798 and it is possible that this jug was made to commemorate that event.

Provenance: Ex Herbert Ward Collection, lot 809, 8th September 1990 and Richardson Collection, lot 96, 9th February 2000 both by Bonhams. £1200-1500
96.     1789 FRENCH REVOLUTION
A large creamware jug, c.1789, printed in black with two scenes of the Bastille being stormed, titled 'The Triumph of Liberty' to one side, restoration to the rim, spout and foot, 23.5cm.

On 14th July 1789, disaffected French nationals stormed the Bastille, thus starting the French Revolution. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.446.
£500-800
97.     CHARLES JAMES FOX
An oval portrait miniature on ivory, c.1790, after the painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 7cm high excluding loop.

The portrait by Reynolds hangs in Holkham Hall, Norfolk.

Provenance: by tradition from 1796 in the collection of the wife of Liverpool reformer, William Roscoe of Allerton Hall, Merseyside. Thence by descent until acquired by the late Tony Banks (Lord Stratford) in 2003, sold Bonhams, 3rd May 2007.

£400-600
98.     CHARLES JAMES FOX
A Wedgwood black basalt oval portrait plaque, late 18th century, moulded with a head and shoulders likeness within an integral moulded bull nose frame, impressed mark, 10.5cm.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.144 where the authors attribute the modelling to John Flaxman after the portrait by Reynolds at Holkham Hall.
£400-600
99.     CHARLES JAMES FOX
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1790, applied in white on a deep blue ground with a head and shoulders likeness, impressed mark,the plaque 9cm high, mounted in an ebonised wood frame.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.144; and footnote to lot 98.

£400-600
100.    CHARLES JAMES FOX
A Ralph Wood type pearlware figure of Charles Fox, c.1790, seated on a tree stump and wearing a manganese jacket over yellow breeches, restoration to both shoulders and the base, 20.5cm.

Cf. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, accession no. 41.194.2 for an identical example.

£500-800
101.    QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware novelty teapot, c.1790, modelled as the double maskhead of Queen Charlotte, the foreheads inscribed 'Queen Charlotte' and 'Tea', with scroll handle and crabstock spout, picked out in blue, raised on a circular foot, restoration to the foot, spout and rim, 125mm.

£300-400
102.    GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Pratt ware loving cup, c.1790, modelled to two sides with masks of the Royal couple, impressed 'GOD SAVE THE KING AND GOD SAVE THE QUEEN' around the rim, washed in green, blue and manganese, the base pieced with five holes, restoration to one handle and the rim, 14cm.
£300-400
103.    GEORGE III
A large pearlware tea canister, c.1790, moulded with half-length profiles after William Hackwood, above satyr maskheads, decorated in blue with small flower sprigs, a small chip to the base, 15.6cm.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson, March 1995.
£400-600
104.    GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Pratt ware cylindrical mug, c.1790, moulded with profile portraits of the two monarchs within circular acanthus bordered panels, the detailing picked out in typical Pratt colours, restoration to the foot, 14.7cm.
£400-600
105.    GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A large Pratt ware mug, c.1790, moulded with profile portraits within circular acanthus leaf bordered panels decorated in typical palette, restoration to the handle, foot and rim, 15.2cm.

Provenance: with John May, September 1994.

£250-350
106.    GEORGE BARRINGTON THE PICKPOCKET
A rare creamware jug, c.1790, printed in black with a scene of two figures titled 'Barrington picking the Pocket of J. Brown Esqr', the reverse with a ship under sail, with double strap handle issuing from floral terminals, restored, 17.7cm.

George Barrington was born George Waldon in County Kildare in 1755. He ran away from school in 1771 after stabbing a fellow pupil. Joining a band of strolling players, he assumed the name Barrington and commenced a life of petty crime as a pickpocket at Limerick Races. Subsequently he fled to London where he was arrested and tried on various occasions and finally convicted and sentenced for deportation to Botany Bay in September 1790. On the convict ship to Australia, he frustrated an attempt by the convicts to seize the ship, thus earning himself favourable consideration and, in 1792, was awarded the first ever warrant of emancipation issued. Famed for his poetry, he also became superintendent of convicts and held the office of high constable in Paramatta in New South Wales, where he died in 1804. £300-500
107.    1791 GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Neale & Co pearlware jug, c.1791, printed in purple with a double portrait medallion inscribed 'A King Revered, A Queen Beloved', the reverse with a Classical figure holding aloft the cap of Liberty together with a lion flanked by a ribboned inscription, beneath the spout inscribed 'S. Buxton 1791', impressed mark, 17cm.
£500-800
108.    TOM PAINE THE RADICAL
A creamware jug, c.1792-95, printed in red with an inscribed oval cartouche picturing the head and detailing the meddling of Tom Paine above four lines of verse, the reverse with a satire of 'Matrimony and Courtship', restoration to the foot and spout, 18cm.

Thomas Paine was a political activist who lived in France during the 1790s and became deeply involved in the French Revolution. In 1792 he was convicted of seditious libel for his pamphlet, 'Rights of Man'. The same year a warrant for his arrest was issued over fears of the revolution spreading to England. Paine was arrested in 1793 and taken to Luxembourg Prison in Paris where he wrote 'The Age of Reason'. He was freed in November 1794 but continued to make enemies among politicians in France, England and America.
£200-300
109.    FRENCH REVOLUTION PROPAGANDA
A pearlware bowl, c.1793, printed in blue to the interior with a satirical scene of a Frenchman eating onions, titled 'French Liberty', within a formal trellis border, the exterior with figures in a Chinese landscape and with bird vignettes, three restored rim cracks, 22.3cm dia.

Gillray's cartoon, published by Hannah Humphries on 21st December 1792, encapsulated the mounting British revulsion for the excesses of the French revolutionaries. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.453.

£400-600
110.    FRENCH REVOLUTION PROPAGANDA
A glazed earthenware jug, c.1815, printed in puce after James Gillray with a satirical scene of a glutton slicing into a side of roast beef, entitled 'British Slavery', flanked by Britannia and a scroll, with printed black flower sprays, some staining and crazing, 14.6cm.

Gillray's cartoon, published by Hannah Humphries on 21st December 1792 contrasted the excesses of the French revolutionaries as compared to the dignity of the Englishman, albeit obsessed by tax. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pp.168-169.


£300-500
111.    FRENCH REVOLUTION PROPAGANDA
A creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black and hand-coloured with satirical cartoons after James Gillray, titled 'British Slavery' and 'French Liberty', restored, 16.7cm.

See footnotes to lots 109 and 110.
£300-500
112.    FRENCH REVOLUTION PROPAGANDA
A rare pearlware jug, c.1793, printed in brown and decorated in colours with satirical cartoons titled 'English Misery' and 'French Happiness', restoration to the handle, foot and upper section, 20cm.

Isaac Cruikshank's cartoon titled 'French Happiness, English Misery', which contrasts the Frenchman's dire situation with that of the Englishman's circumstances, was published by S W Fores on 3rd January 1793. £800-1200
113.    1793 EXECUTION OF LOUIS XVI
A cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1793, printed in blue with a scene entitled 'View of La Guillotine or the modern Beheading Machine at Paris, By which Louis XVI late King of France was Beheaded Jan. 21 1793', two figures watching as the king lies prone beneath the blade, 11.5cm.

Provenance: with Howards of Aberystwyth, September 1995.
£800-1200
114.    1793 EXECUTION OF LOUIS XVI
A John Aynsley creamware mug, c.1793, printed in brown with a scene entitled 'Massacre & Execution of Louis XVI, King of France', with four figures including the executioners and the king's confessor, around the scene inscribed 'J Aynsley, Lane End', broken and restored, 12.4cm.

Cf. British Museum, No. 1988,1201.1 for an identical mug printed in black.

£400-600
115.    1793 EXECUTION OF LOUIS XVI
A large and rare creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with moving figural scenes titled 'The last interview of Louis the Sixteenth with his family' and 'Death of Louis XVI King of France who was beheaded Jan'y. 21 1793', restoration to the spout and foot, two oversprayed cracks, 23.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.457. £800-1200
116.    1793 EXECUTION OF LOUIS XVI
A rare creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with detailed scenes entitled 'Separation of Louis XVI from his Family' and 'La Guillotine or the Modern Beheading Machine at Paris', together with inscribed details, the spout restored, 182mm. £800-1200
117.    1793 FRENCH REVOLUTION PROPAGANDA
A cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1793, printed in black with medallions entitled 'British Liberty' and 'French Liberty' after the cartoons by Thomas Rowlandson, opposite the handle inscribed 'The Contrast 1793 Which is Best', some restoration to the foot, 15.1cm.

Cf. British Museum, No. 1982,1101.1, for a similar example. £300-500
118.    BRITISH PROPAGANDA
A cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1793, the fluted body inscribed in brown with 'God Save our Church and King' within a husk roundel, flanked by colourful sprays of flowers, the rim with a trellis border in lilac and green, the handle broken and restored, some rim faults, 15.5cm.
£300-500
119.    GEORGE III
A rare pearlware jug, c.1793, printed in blue with a circular portrait panel titled 'George III King of Great Britain, France and Ireland' above six lines of loyal verse, the reverse with a scene of spectators watching a horse race, the rim banded in yellow and blue, restored, 16.7cm.
£500-800
120.    BRITISH PROPAGANDA
A pearlware jug, c.1793, printed in blue with six lines of loyal verse within a formal cartouche, the reverse with the Royal coat of arms, restored, 16.5cm.

Provenance: with John May, April 1994.

£400-600
121.    BRITISH PROPAGANDA
A large pearlware jug, dated 1793, printed in blue with eight lines of dated verse titled 'William Adams', to one side with the scene of a couple seated at a table enjoying 'Good Ale', the other with a pierced heart amid fruits and foliage, restored footrim chips, 20.4cm. £400-600
122.    GEORGE III
A large creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with a named profile of George III flanked by British imagery and a satire of the British lion befouling the French flag, the reverse with a named oval equestrian portrait of William III, beneath the spout with a circular cartouche inscribed 'King and Constitution', restoration to the spout and base, 24.5cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.32.

£1000-1500
123.    GEORGE III
A pearlware bowl, c.1793, printed in blue with a double portrait oval to the interior, inscribed and titled 'King and Constitution', with wide formal borders, a section broken out and restored, 22cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.31, and Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.27. £200-300
124.    GEORGE III
A pearlware punch bowl, c.1793, printed in blue to the interior with the inscription 'Long Live The King' within a Fitzhugh border, the exterior with Chinese pagoda landscapes, minor faults, 24cm.

Provenance: with John May, August 1995.
£250-350
125.    GEORGE III
A pearlware punch bowl, c.1793, printed in blue to the interior with an inscribed portrait and military trophies vignette within a wide elaborate border, the exterior with views of Chinese pagodas, figures and elephants, the foot reduced, some restoration to the rim, 25.4cm.

£300-500
126.    GEORGE III AND THE LATE KING OF FRANCE
A cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1793, printed in black with obscured profiles of George III and Charlotte, and of Louis and Marie Antoinette with a broken crown, titled 'A New Puzzle of Portraits', the rim lined in ochre, restored, 9.3cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.31.

£400-600
127.    PRINCE OF WALES, GRAND MASTER IN THE MASONS
A rare cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1793, printed in black with an allegory of Justice holding a portrait of the Prince of Wales attended by Fortitude and Prudence together with Masonic symbols and a book initialled G and inscribed 'VIDE AUDE TACE', a small restuck chip, 14.7cm.

As a Masonic Grand Master in 1793 the Prince of Wales was depicted in an engraving after the original by Mather Brown, which formed the inspiration for this cartoon. Cf. Masonic Quarterly Magazine, issue 12, January 2005, referring to the original article of 1793 entitled 'The Six Masonic Sons of George III'.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, June 2006.
£700-1000
128.    18TH JUNE 1793: NAVAL ENGAGEMENT
A rare creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with two ships at battle titled 'The Engagement between the Nymph 32 Guns 250 men and La Cleopatra 40 Guns 320 men 18 June 1793', the reverse with an oval panel containing a typical Sailor's Farewell scene, three small footrim chips, 20.1cm.

Upon the dawn encounter between the British ship Nymph and the French Cleopatra off the southern most point of Devon, Captain Edward Pellew ordered his somewhat inexperienced crew to pursue the Cleopatra. In the ensuing action, which lasted but fifty minutes, the English were victorious. Celebration greeted their return to port with this the first major French prize of the conflict and when the news reached George III, whilst he was at the opera, he immediately and spontaneously announced the victory to the auditorium.
£800-1200
129.    GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A small pearlware jug, c.1793, the barrel-shaped body printed in brown and decorated in colours with a double portrait of the Royal couple seated at a table, titled in scrolls beside, the reverse with an equestrian portrait of the Duke of York, a restored rim section, 13cm.
£200-300
130.    GEORGE III, QUEEN CHARLOTTE, PRINCE ADOLPHUS AND DUKE OF YORK
A pearlware jug, c.1793, printed in black and decorated in colours with named portraits, to one side the Royal couple seated by a table, the reverse with the two sons in military uniform, some restoration, 13.8cm.

Prince Adolphus, seventh son of George III, was created Duke of Cambridge in 1801. Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, pl.167.
£200-300
131.    DUKE OF YORK
A pearlware punch bowl, c.1793, painted in blue to the interior with 'Success to the Duke of York and the Combined Armies' within a trellis design border, the exterior with stylized flower sprays, raised on a low circular foot, a restored rim crack, the foot restored, 25.9cm dia.
£250-350
132.    DUKE OF YORK
A pearlware mug, c.1793, the cylindrical body printed in black and hand-coloured with an equestrian battlefield portrait, a footrim chip, some staining, 12.8cm.

The battle scene depicted is that of the successful storming of Valenciennes by the Duke of York in July 1793. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.35, and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.464.

£250-350
133.    DUKE OF YORK
A creamware mug, c.1793, the cylindrical body printed in black with an equestrian battlefield portrait, titled beneath 'His Royal Highness Frederick Duke of York', a filled footrim chip and small rim chip, 13.2cm. £400-600
134.    DUKE OF YORK
A pearlware jug, c.1793, printed in black and hand-coloured with an equestrian battlefield portrait, titled' His Royal Highness Frederick Duke of York' around the rim, old restoration to the spout and handle, 14.4cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.172, pl.465 for a plate with the same print.

£250-350
135.    DUKE OF YORK AND PRINCE COBURG
A Pratt ware jug, c.1793, moulded to each side with an equestrian portrait, the neck inscribed in blue with 'Duke of York' and 'Prince. Coburg', restoration to the rim and foot, 15cm.

Prince Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld commanded the Austrian army during the Flanders Campaign and, together with the British under the Duke of York, was successful in taking Valenciennes in July 1793. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, pp.167-168.

£100-150
136.    DUKE OF YORK AND FRENCH ROYAL FAMILY
A Pratt ware jug, c.1793, moulded with a profile portrait of the Duke of York, the reverse with superimposed profiles of the French royals including the Dauphin, restoration to the spout, handle and foot, 18.8cm.

Both Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were executed in 1793 on 21st January and 16th October respectively. Their second son, who succeeded as Dauphin following the death of his older brother on 4th June 1789, died 8th June 1795 of extreme ill health. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.129.
£150-200
137.    DUKE OF YORK
A dry-bodied stoneware jug, late 18th century, moulded with a portrait oval on a blue ground, flanked by military trophies, impressed 'Duke of York', the straight neck with ringed decoration coloured green with blue lined rim, some retouching to the rim, 18cm.
£150-200
138.     DUKE OF YORK AT VALENCIENNES
A creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with a scene titled 'Surrender of Valenciennes', showing General Ferrand kneeling before the Duke of York, the reverse with an Irish Volunteer cavalryman decorated in colours, a small chip to the spout, 21.8cm.

General Jean Henri Becays Ferrand initially refused an order to surrender Valenciennes but, following the two month siege by the Duke of York, he did so on 28th July 1793. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.32, and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.429 and 467. £400-600
139.    STORMING OF VALENCIENNES AND SURRENDER OF TOULON
A rare creamware jug, c.1793, printed in black with a panel of three soldiers titled 'Lieut General O'Hara Governor of Toulon', the reverse with a battle scene titled 'Storming and Taking Valenciennes by the British Troops etc', restoration to the spout, handle and foot, 21cm.

General Charles O'Hara was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Gibraltar in 1792, from where he was sent to be Governor of Toulon. At the storming of nearby Fort Mulgrave on the Heights of Arenes on 30th November he was wounded and taken prisoner by the French. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.466 and 469, and John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.33. £600-800
140.    1794 DUKE OF YORK
A large creamware jug, dated 1794, printed in black with a named equestrian portrait, the reverse with a cartouche of a drunk man above four lines of verse, beneath the spout boldly inscribed 'John Steel Another Jug and then 1794', a large restored crack, 24cm.
£500-800
141.    EARL HOWE
A cylindrical creamware mug, c.1794, printed in black with an oval panel containing a head and shoulders portrait titled 'The Right Hon.ble Rich'd Earl Howe', restoration to the handle and body, 12.5cm.

Whilst the Rt Hon. Richard Earl Howe hoisted his flag on HMS Queen Charlotte in May 1793 (and for which commemorative souvenirs may have been produced) this mug is more likely to have been manufactured following his victory against the French at the Battle of the Glorious First of June in 1794.

Provenance: formerly the Gordon-Pugh collection, sold Christie's, 26th April 2001, lot 49.


£300-400
142.    EARL HOWE AND THE VICTORY AT THE BATTLE OF THE GLORIOUS FIRST OF JUNE
A creamware jug, dated 1794, printed in black with an inscribed cartouche bordered by mythical nautical figures flanking a profile of George III, the reverse with a naval engagement, 15cm.
£400-600
143.    EARL HOWE AND VICTORY AT THE BATTLE OF THE GLORIOUS FIRST OF JUNE
A tall creamware jug, c.1794, printed in black with a circular panel of a naval engagement representing the defeat of the French Fleet at Brest, the reverse with figures in a tavern interior, titled 'The Flowing Cann' with six short lines of verse, 23.6cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 472 and p.123 for a note upon The Flowing Cann lyric.
£800-1200
144.    EARL HOWE
A pearlware jug, c.1797-1800, printed in purple with a portrait of the Commander depicted on deck, titled 'Right Hon. Earl Howe', the reverse with a figural scene entitled 'The Female Archers', beneath the spout with an RL monogram in red, restoration to the spout, 20.5cm.

Whilst this print has been recorded on a jug celebrating the victory of the Battle of the Glorious First of June (see Drakard, p.175) the style of this jug is later. In May 1797 Howe was called upon to pacify the Spithead Mutineers for which he was created Knight of the Garter on 2nd June 1797. He died on 5th August 1799. It may have been for either of these events that this jug was produced.
£300-400
145.    EARL HOWE
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, c.1798, applied in white on a pale blue ground with a head and shoulders profile the plaque 9.5mm high, mounted in a later frame.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.195 where the authors attribute the modelling to John de Vaere in 1798.
£300-400
146.    EARL HOWE
A Pratt ware oval plaque, c.1797, moulded with a head and shoulders portrait pinned with the Garter Star, flanked by military trophies painted in a typical palette, the moulded frame with pierced scrollwork, 21.3cm.

See footnote to lot 144. The similarity of portraits of both Howe and Keppel allowed the potter great licence. however, Howe alone was appointed Knight of the Garter.

Provenance: with John Howard, June 2005.

£700-900
147.    GEORGE PRINCE OF WALES AND CAROLINE PRINCESS OF WALES
A pair of Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaques, c.1795, each applied in white on a pale blue ground with elaborately hatted head and shoulder profiles, each plaque 13.3cm high, mounted in later frames. (2)

The portrait of George is attributed to John Flaxman and was taken from the drawing by Edmund Scott, depicting him in the uniform of Colonel of the 10th Light Dragoons. While this dates from an early period, that of Caroline (also attributed to Flaxman after Edmund Scott) was engraved by T. Barrow in 1795. Depicted in extravagant headwear, it seems probable that this pair of plaques was made to celebrate their wedding on 8th April 1795. Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, pp.83 and 168.
£700-1000
148.    DUKE OF CUMBERLAND
A Pratt ware jug, c.1796, moulded with an equestrian portrait, the reverse with Hercules slaying the Hydra, beneath the spout with a figure carrying a flag on horseback, restoration to the spout, 16cm.

William Augustus was the youngest son of George II. Born in 1721 he is best remembered for his triumphant yet bloody success at Culloden in 1746 when the Jacobite revolution was crushed. Dating from fifty years after that event, this jug probably commemorates the popular victor of the day. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, pp.166 and 201.
£100-150
149.    SHREWSBURY GENERAL ELECTION
A rare blue and white 'John Hill' election jug, Caughley or early John Rose Coalport, dated 1796, the spirally fluted body inscribed 'Honour and Honesty. John Hill for Ever. Prosperity to the House of Hawkstone', beneath the spout with the legend 'Majority of 44 in the Year 1796', restoration to the handle's terminal, 22.1cm.

The controversial Shrewsbury election of 1796 did not in fact result in a victory for John Hill, as the inscription on this jug suggests. John Hill's claimed "Majority of 44" was reached by adding spoilt ballot papers to his valid votes, and amounted only to a majority over his younger kinsman, William Hill, rather than to the overall victor, William Pulteney. The confusion regarding attribution of the jug itself lies in the closeness of the two factories and the fact that several moulds exist. It is possible that both factories produced these Election jugs, although it has sometimes been quoted as the earliest known dated Coalport porcelain. Cf. Michael Messenger, Coalport Porcelain, pp.60-64. £600-800
150.    SHREWSBURY GENERAL ELECTION
A blue and white spiral-fluted jug, c.1796-1806, Caughley or early John Rose Coalport, printed with the heraldic shields of Shrewsbury and William Noel-Hill, third Baron Berwick beneath ribbon banners inscribed 'The Corporation and William Hill', restored, 18.3cm.

See footnote to lot 149. This jug appears to have been made in support of William Hill rather than his cousin, John, and may possibly date to the 1806 election when Hill was finally successful (Sir William Pulteney who had triumphed in 1796 having died the previous year).

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, July 2005.
£600-800
151.    1797 SIR JOHN JERVIS AND THE BATTLE OF CAPE ST VINCENT
A large and rare creamware jug, c.1797, printed in black with a portrait oval titled 'Sir John Jarvis [sic] KB Admiral of the Blue', bordered by a vignette of a ship detailing the success, and Fame depicted with trumpet holding a ribbon inscribed with previous battle honours above four lines of loyal toast, the reverse with a figural circular panel, a sailing ship in the background, above four lines of verse titled 'Jack Spritsails Frolic', restoration to the rim and foot, 26cm.

Knighted in 1782 for action off Gibraltar, Jervis was raised to the Peerage on 23rd August 1797 as Baron Jervis of Meaford and Earl St Vincent, in recognition of his triumph at Cape St. Vincent. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.88 for a description of the print of Jervis.

Provenance: with Martyn Edgell, December 2016.
£600-800
152.    EARL ST VINCENT
A creamware jug, c.1797, printed in black and hand-coloured with an oval panel containing a head and shoulders portrait titled 'Earl St Vincent' beneath, the reverse with a compass, the centre inscribed 'J Johnson, Liverpool', restored, 13.6cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 312 and 473.


£400-600
153.    EARL ST VINCENT
A Pratt ware jug, c.1797, moulded with three-quarter length portraits flanked by sailing vessels on both sides, one titled 'Lord Garvis' [sic] in banners above, between moulded stiff leaf borders, some restoration beneath the spout, 16cm.

Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, col. pls. 32 and 33.

£200-300
154.    11TH OCTOBER 1797: ADMIRAL DUNCAN AND THE BATTLE OF CAMPERDOWN
A cylindrical creamware mug, c.1797, printed in black and hand-coloured with a portrait titled 'Admiral Lord Viscount Duncan Who defeated the Dutch Fleet Oct. 11th 1797. God Save the King - Huzzah!', broken and restored, 12.3cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 476.
£200-300
155.    ADMIRAL DUNCAN
A creamware jug, c.1797, printed in black with a profile portrait of 'Admiral Lord Viscount Duncan' in an oval panel, inscribed 'Printed & engraved by Thos Baddeley Chapel-Field Hanley' above six lines of loyal verse, the reverse with a picture of 'The Spinning Machine', inscribed for the success of the cotton trade and commerce above four lines of verse, restoration to the spout, 14cm.

Although undated, reference to the Dutch defeat suggests this jug would have been made in celebration of Duncan's victory at Camperdown. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.177 for a description of the Duncan print.
£400-600
156.    ADMIRAL DUNCAN
A pearlware jug, c.1797, printed in black and hand-coloured with a profile portrait, faintly titled 'Admiral Lord Duncan', the reverse painted with a spoiled anchor, the rim with narrow bands in red, green and black, a short rim crack, 17.3cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 477.

Provenance: with John Howard, June 2014.
£400-600
157.    ADMIRAL DUNCAN
A Pratt ware jug, c.1797, moulded to one side with a profile portrait titled 'Admiral Duncan' to a sash across the body, the reverse with two Classical figures of Peace and Plenty, restoration to the handle and body, 17cm.

Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, pp. 140 and 198. £120-180
158.    ADMIRAL DUNCAN AND CAPTAIN TROLLOPE
A Pratt ware jug, c.1797, moulded with profile portraits titled 'Captain Trolop' [sic] and 'Admiral Duncan', each flanked by warships and a figure of Fame, decorated in a typical palette of green, blue, ochre and umber, restoration to the spout and rim, 20cm.

Captain Trollope was knighted for his success at Camperdown. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, pp. 102 and 140; also David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.177 for a description of the Trollope jug.

£120-180
159.    11TH OCTOBER 1797: DUNCAN AND THE BATTLE OF CAMPERDOWN
A large and rare creamware jug, dated 1797, printed in black with a portrait cartouche flanked by Tritons and warships, beneath the banner 'Lord Viscount Duncan', the reverse with an inscribed and dated naval engagement scene, beneath the spout painted with the name 'Elizabeth Rees', small star cracks to the base, 21.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 151 and 152.

Provenance: with John May, March 1996.
£800-1200
160.    BATTLE OF THE NILE
A Derby mug, c.1798, the cylindrical body painted with a circular cartouche of Egyptian trophies, a trident, and an ibis perched on a cannon behind flags, within a border of raised gilt stars upon a salmon pink ground, with foliate moulded handle, a short crack to the base, 8cm high.

Cf. The Alexander Davison Collection, Sotheby's, 21st October 2002, lot 19 for the same scene depicted on one of a pair of wine coolers believed to have been presented to Lord Nelson by his treasurer and prize agent, Alexander Davison.
£800-1200
161.    1798 NELSON AND THE BATTLE OF THE NILE
A large cylindrical creamware frog mug, c.1798, printed in black with an inscribed naval engagement scene entitled 'Lord Nelson engaging the Toulon Fleet off the Mouths of the Nile', the interior modelled with a large brown frog, restored, 15.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.177, pl.478 for a jug with the same print.
£250-350
162.    NELSON AND BERRY
A Pratt ware jug, c.1798, moulded to each side with profile portraits titled 'Captain Berry' and 'Admiral Nelson', flanked by warships at sail, decorated in a typical palette, a small chip to the spout, 18.5cm.

Edward Berry was Nelson's Flag Captain at the Battle of the Nile. He conveyed news of the victory to Britain and was knighted on 12th December 1798. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.147.
£120-180
163.    1798 BATTLE OF THE NILE AND NELSON
A large creamware jug, c.1798, printed in black with an oval portrait panel titled 'Admiral Lord Nelson' above a battle plan, the reverse with Nelson's coat of arms and first motto, painted beneath the spout with the name 'JNo Harris Esq' within wheat and vine branches, restoration to the spout, 25.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.154.

Provenance: Ex Pugh collection, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 26th April 2001, lot 60.
£600-800
164.    BARON NELSON
A large documentary creamware jug, dated 1799, printed in black with a full-length portrait oval titled 'Baron Nelson of the Nile and of Burnham Thorpe in the County of Norfolk', the reverse with an oval medallion of Masonic symbols above a four line inscription, beneath the spout painted with the name 'Wm Hunderhill 1799' within a brown foliate cartouche, restoration to the foot and handle, 23.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.479 for the same portrait oval, although differently inscribed. £400-600
165.    1798 CORNWALLIS AND THE IRISH REBELLION
A large creamware jug, c.1798, printed in black with a portrait flanked by Classical figures and trophies, the reverse with a map of Ireland, beneath the spout inscribed 'Success to the Yeomanry' within an oak leaf cartouche, some restoration, 24.5cm.

Between the 24th May 1798 and 12th October 1798 a series of violent clashes occurred, with Cornwallis being appointed both Lord Lieutenant and Commander-in-Chief of Ireland in the June. A large force of both regular troops and militia was sent to Ireland to quell the uprising.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, October 2009.

£500-800
166.    ADMIRAL ANDREW MITCHELL
A Pratt ware jug, c.1799-1801, inscribed in brown 'Success to Admiral Mitchell' within moulded and painted foliate sprays beneath a formal stiff leaf border with blue and ochre highlights, an anchor beneath the spout, a small chip to the spout, 15.9cm.

Mitchell was appointed Vice-Admiral in 1799. On 30th August he received surrender of the Dutch ships and in January 1800 he was Knighted. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.157 for a similar jug inscribed for General Harris. £100-150
167.    1799 SIEGE OF ACRE AND SIR SIDNEY SMITH
A large creamware jug, c.1799, printed in black with a named portrait of Earl St Vincent within a border entwined with a ribbon inscribed with battle honours, the reverse with a warship under sail
titled 'Success to Sir Sidney Smith' and inscribed 'Sir Sidney Smith embarking on board the Tiger of 74 guns after defeating Bonaparte at D'Acre', a restored chip to the foot, 24cm.

The French laid siege to Acre on 20th March 1799. With their persistence repeatedly overcome by the reinforced defence of the city walls and superior maritime fire power, they retreated to Egypt on 21st May following the last assault on 10th May. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.483. £800-1200
168.    SIR SIDNEY SMITH AND THE SIEGE OF ACRE
A Samuel Alcock Parian type jug, c.1840-50, the white body decorated in lilac relief on a white ground with Sir William Sidney Smith (later Admiral) defending the breach at Acre, black printed mark, star crack to the base, 20cm.
£30-50
169.    LORD NELSON
A German porcelain oval plaque (Hutschenreuther), c.1880, painted by Adolph Harrass with a portrait of Admiral Lord Nelson in uniform, signed, impressed HR mark, the plaque 17.3cm high, mounted in a gilt wood frame.

Adolph Harrass was born in Grossbreitenbach, Germany and is recorded as painting on porcelain from 1861 at Hutschenreuther of Hohenberg an der Eger in Bavaria, the company being founded in 1814. This portrait of Nelson closely resembles the engraving of 1801 by Jas Heath which was based upon Abbot's study of 1797 taken at Greenwich Hospital whilst Nelson was convalescing.

Provenance: with Ellison Fine Art, September 2017.
£300-500
170.    GEORGE III
An oval enamel portrait miniature, c.1800, painted in the manner of Henry Bone, dressed in scarlet uniform, the pinchbeck frame glazed both front and rear, the plaque 7cm.

After William Beechley's full-length portrait of George, III depicted wearing a tricorn hat, which hangs in Buckingham Palace. See RCIN 405422.

Provenance: with Ellison Fine Art, June 2016.

£800-1200
171.    15TH MAY 1800 GEORGE III PRESERVED FROM ASSASSINATION
A large Jasperware porter mug, c.1800, the cylindrical body applied in white on a blue ground with an angel floating in the clouds holding a shield depicting George III and another impaled with an arrow, the reverse with a maiden grieving at a tomb, centred by classical figures in clouds flanked by trees, 13.4cm.

P. Kempson designed a medal to commemorate the failed assassination attempt by James Hadfield, when Hadfield fired a shot at the King during the singing of the National Anthem at Drury Lane Theatre on 15th May 1800. It is cast on one side with the same angelic figure thwarting an arrow. See Royal Collections Trust, RCIN 440019.

£300-500
172.    15TH MAY 1800: GEORGE III PRESERVED FROM ASSASSINATION
A pearlware puzzle jug, dated 1800, the flattened moonflask body moulded with a sun motif and brightly decorated with auspicious Chinese objects and flowerheads, inscribed 'From every latent foe from the assassins blow: God save the King', the neck with three apertures beneath a pierced rim, the handle modelled as a term, minor restoration, 28cm.

The inscription is taken from the words by the playwright and owner of the Drury Lane Theatre, Richard Sheridan, who immediately composed an additional verse to the National Anthem, which was sung from the stage the same night as the failed assassination attempt.
£500-800
173.    4TH OCTOBER 1800: BOROUGH OF WIGAN ELECTION
A creamware mug, c.1800, printed in black with an oval cartouche listing the Independent Burgesses, the reverse with a panel depicting Liberty, flanking a shield inscribed 'John Vause Esqr. Mayor Elected 4th Oct'r 1800', minor faults, 11.8cm.

The previous controlling interests of the borough of Wigan were overturned when new Burgesses were created, resulting in the election of John Vause as Mayor.
£400-600
174.    1800 GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND ACT OF UNION
A creamware jug, c.1800, printed in black with an oval cartouche depicting a figure emblematic of Peace and Plenty with an olive branch and overflowing cornucopia, the reverse with an inscribed and dated panel emblematic of the Union, beneath the spout with the name Mary Beynon and numbered 10, green enamelled line to the rim, 17.2cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.42 right.
£200-300
175.    1800 GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND ACT OF UNION
A creamware jug, c.1800, printed in black with an oval panel depicting three men holding aloft the cap of Liberty, a banner above titled 'Union to the People of Ireland', the foliate border signed in the print with 'Fletcher Shelton', the reverse with a panel of Masonic trophies, restoration to the base, 19cm.

From 1796 Thomas Fletcher worked as a printer and enameller in Hanley, following several failed partnerships with other ceramic manufacturers. In 1800 an auction listed 450 copper plates "late in the possession of Mr Thomas Fletcher, Black printer of Shelton".
£250-350
176.    1800 GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND ACT OF UNION
A large creamware jug, dated 1800, printed in black with a scene of a woman recumbent on a grassy bank, titled 'The Little Market Woman' above an eight line comic verse, the reverse inscribed 'Great Britain and Ireland United 1800' above a lion and an anchor, restoration around the base, 23cm.
£250-350
177.    MARQUESS CORNWALLIS AND IRELAND
A creamware mug, c.1800, printed in black with an oval portrait cartouche titled 'Marquis Cornwallis', flanked by figures of Justice and Mercy, inscribed 'To whose Clemency & Bravery Ireland owes her Preservation', restored, 12.2cm.

In June 1798 Cornwallis was appointed both Lord Lieutenant and Commander in Chief of Ireland with instructions to quell the Irish rebellion; in the aftermath of which the Act of Union of Great Britain and Ireland, which received Royal assent on 1st August 1800, came into force the following 1st January. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.160.

£200-300
178.    MARQUESS CORNWALLIS
A Herculaneum pearlware jug, c.1800, printed with a named portrait oval, with black line decoration to the neck and rim, impressed mark, a hairline rim crack, 19.8cm. £400-600
179.    WILLIAM PITT (THE YOUNGER)
A small and rare creamware mug, c.1801, the cylindrical form printed in black with a portrait contained in an oval panel, titled 'The Right Hon.ble William Pitt' on a banner, restored, 9.7cm.

Pitt served as Prime Minister between 19th December 1783 and 14th March 1801, and again from 10th May 1804 until his death on 23rd January 1806. Given the simplicity of the inscription of his name on this piece it seems likely it was made at a time when he was out of office. £500-800
180.    BATTLE OF ALEXANDRIA
A rare creamware mug, c.1801, the cylindrical body printed in black and decorated in colours with a Highlander playing a bagpipe in the form of Bonaparte, inscribed with speech bubble and entitled 'An Old Performer playing a new Instrument or one of the 42nd toutching [sic] the Invincible', 11.5cm.

The British were victorious at the Battle of Alexandria on 21st March 1801 and the 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment captured the colours of Napoleon's Invincibles. This satire was published by Fores shortly thereafter. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 554.

Provenance: Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, sold Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 583.

£800-1200
181.    1801 GENERAL SIR RALPH ABERCROMBIE IN MEMORIAM
A large creamware jug, c.1801, the wide bodied form printed in black and decorated in colours with a 'God Speed the Plough' scene, beneath the spout with grieving infantrymen crossing swords over a tomb titled 'The Tomb of Gen'l Abercromby' [sic], the reverse with a four line stanza of remembrance, restored, 20.8cm.

Born on 7th October 1734, Abercrombie was a skilled soldier and politician. He commanded the expedition to the Mediterranean in 1801 and defeated the French at Alexandria. During the battle he was struck by a musket ball and died seven days later on 28th March. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.484.
£400-600
182.    1801 NELSON'S VICTORIES
A creamware plate, c.1801, painted with a central fouled anchor inscribed 'Nelson 2nd April Baltic' within a border of oak leaves and acorns, inscribed and dated for San Josef and Aboukir, 24.7cm.

Nelson was victorious at San Josef on 14th February 1797, Aboukir on 1st August 1798 and Copenhagen on 2nd April 1801. Labels inscribed by Charles Wentworth Wass and affixed to the reverse suggest the plate formed part of a service presented to Lord Nelson by the City of London following the Battle of Copenhagen. The Baltic Service presented by the City of London was manufactured by both Coalport and Paris in porcelain whereas these pottery versions were probably made as contemporary commercial souvenirs. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.157.

Provenance: C.Wentworth Wass collection, sold Phillips, 6 December 1995, lot 328.

£300-500
183.    NELSON AND THE PEACE OF AMIENS
A Pratt ware jug, c.1801, moulded and painted with a scene of Britannia flanked by soldiers beneath a motif of clasped hands, the reverse with a warship under sail, a full-length portrait of Nelson within a laurel leaf cartouche beneath the spout, restoration to the spout and handle, 18cm.

Negotiations that led to the signing of the Peace Treaty of Amiens in 1802 commenced in the summer of 1801 following the resignation of William Pitt earlier that year. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.153 for an identical jug, the portrait named Nelson. £150-200
184.    NELSON AND THE PEACE OF AMIENS
A large creamware jug, c.1801, printed in black with a named portrait medallion titled 'Here's our old friend and success to the peace makers', the reverse with a warship under sail, a small vignette of Fame beneath the spout, 20.2cm.

Negotiations that led to the signing of the Peace Treaty of Amiens in 1802 commenced in the summer of 1801 following the resignation of William Pitt earlier that year. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.480. £500-800
185.    PEACE OF AMIENS
A pearlware jug, c.1801-02, printed in grey with an allegorical scene of Britannia in a chariot drawn by crowned lions, holding portraits entitled 'George III For Ever' and 'Down with Bonaparte', a putto in flight with a banner inscribed 'May Peace be Restored', restoration to the spout, 16.7cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl. 3.

£150-250
186.    1802 PEACE OF AMIENS
A Chamberlain's Worcester beaker, c.1802, the flared form well painted with a scene of a portrait bust of George III being crowned by putti, raised on a pedestal inscribed 'Peace' and flanked by a soldier and a sailor, reserved on a peach ground with gilt scrolls, husks and flowerheads, the underside inscribed 'Chamberlain Worcester' in gilt, a long restored rim crack and associated filled chip, 11.1cm.

After long negotiations, the Treaty of Amiens was signed on 25th March 1802 by Charles, Marquess Cornwallis and Joseph Bonaparte.
£1000-1500
187.    1802 PEACE OF AMIENS
A rare creamware cylindrical mug, c.1802, printed in black with a scene of Britannia and France each holding the hand of Peace flanked by six figures identified in script below, a putto holding the banner 'Blessed is the Peace Maker', signed Cockburn, a little good restoration to the foot, 11.6cm.

Jacques, Marquis de Lauriston, conveyed to England the ratification of peace to which Charles, Marquess Cornwallis was the chief signatory for the British.

£500-800
188.    1802 PEACE OF AMIENS
A Bristol Pottery pearlware mug, c.1802, printed in brown and decorated in colours with an inscribed tablet flanked by Britannia and France, signed in the print 'Bristol Pottery', a chip to the foot and faint rim crack, 11.8cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.158; and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.496.

Provenance: ex Norman Stretton collection, sold Phillips, 21st February 2001, lot 202.

£200-300
189.    1802 PEACE OF AMIENS
A creamware jug, c.1802, the slender body printed in black with a panel depicting Napoleon Bonaparte and others on horseback, titled 'Bonaparte Chief Consul', the reverse with entwined flags inscribed 'Peace and Commerce', restored cracks, 18.2cm.
£250-350
190.    1802 PEACE OF AMIENS
A good Pratt ware jug, c.1802, moulded with Classical head portraits in profile of George III and Bonaparte beneath initials between cornucopia motifs, beneath the spout with a figure emblematic of Peace and Plenty, painted in typical palette, 19.2cm.

Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.124. £300-400
191.    1803 RESUMPTION OF WAR WITH FRANCE
A small creamware jug, c.1803, printed in black with two scenes of figures arming themselves for battle, jointly captioned 'Preparations for Hostilities', star cracks, restoration to the foot, 13.8cm.

William Holland's satire of the same name, published on 3rd May 1803 just prior to war being declared on 18th May, was the inspiration for this cartoon. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.507. £400-600
192.    1803 RESUMPTION OF WAR WITH FRANCE
A small creamware jug, c.1803, printed in black with an inscribed satire depicting John Bull addressing Bonaparte standing upon a map of Europe, titled' The Governor of Europe stoped [sic] in his Career', the reverse inscribed 'Success to the Volunteers', a short body crack, 14cm.

A letter accompanying the lot, written by David Drakard to Robin Simpson and dated 6th December 1992, provides a likely explanation as to the statement by John Bull; 'Paws of Pompey' meaning 'Keep your hands off Britain'. Pompey is the Naval nickname for Portsmouth, home of British Fleet. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.501 for the satire published by Fores on 16th April 1803.

£400-600
193.    1803 RESUMPTION OF WAR WITH FRANCE
A large creamware jug, c.1803, printed in red with a scene of a woman emptying a pot over Napoleon while a child urinates on him, captioned 'Bonaparte in the Suds', the reverse with John Bull kneeling before the hanged Frenchman, titled ''The Apotheosis of Bonaparte', restored, 20.4cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.505 and 559. £400-600
194.    1803 THE GREAT INVASION SCARE
A creamware jug, c.1803, printed in red with a scene titled 'John Bull peppering Buonaparte in the front and rear', the reverse with six lines of verse above a satire titled 'John Bull at Dover, Boney at Calais', a crack to the base, 17cm.

The Gillray satire inscribed 'I Am Coming, I Am Coming', published 2nd August 1803 by Hannah Humphrey, was the inspiration for this cartoon. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.510 and 512.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson, July 2001.
£500-800
195.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A creamware jug, c.1803, printed in black to one side with a scene titled 'John Bull out of All Patience', the reverse with 'The Apotheosis of Bonaparte', restoration, 16.8cm.

A similar satire was published by William Holland on 16th August 1803, 'The Apotheosis of Bonaparte' having been published by John Badcock on 10th August. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 522, 524, 525 and 527.
£250-350
196.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Spode porcelain jug, c.1803, the barrel body printed in black and decorated in coloured enamels with a scene titled 'Pidcock's Grand Menagerie, Exeter Change', including the Corsican monkey, the rim and handle gilded, staining around the base, 16.6cm.

Josiah Spode's inspiration for this splendid mocking of Bonaparte was Lee's satire of the same name, published on 27th August 1803, by James Asperne. The Exeter Exchange, located on the north side of the Strand, was an arcade, three floors of which were occupied by Gilbert Pidcock's menagerie of incredible and rare animals with all the related smell and noise pervading the Strand. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 569 a, b and c. £600-800
197.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Spode porcelain jug, c.1803, printed in black and hand-coloured with a scene of a corpulent toper seated with Napoleon Bonaparte, titled 'National Contrasts, or Bulky and Boney', the rim and handle gilded, 10.9cm.

After a satire published by Piercy Roberts. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls 564, 566a and 566b.

Provenance: Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 582.

£400-600
198.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Spode porcelain jug, c.1803, printed in black with a scene of Napoleon sitting astride the globe and being challenged by John Bull, titled 'A stoppage to a stride over the globe', the rim and handle gilded, 15cm.

After the satire published by Piercy Roberts. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.548.
£500-800
199.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A large Spode porcelain jug, c.1803, printed in black and well coloured with a scene of Napoleon seated at a table with Satan, titled 'A Senatus Consultum on Bonaparte making his Will, before his Invasion of England & Conquest of the World!', the rim and handle gilded, minor chipping to the spout and foot, 16.5cm.

The date of publication on the Fores satire of the same title is 19th September 1808. It is described by M. Dorothy George in the 'Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires in the British Museum', VIII, 1947, as similar to that produced in 1803. It is highly likely that Spode would have produced all of the Invasion Scare series at much the same time in 1803 and therefore the assumption is that Fores reissued this engraving in 1808 with the minor alteration to the last figure of the date. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.571.

Provenance: ex Lewison collection, sold Phillips, 8th April 1998, lot 428.
£700-900
200.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Spode porcelain porter mug, c.1803, the squat form printed in black and well coloured with a procession and crowd scene titled 'The Grand Triumphal Entry of the Chief Consul into London', the rim and handle gilded, 9cm.

A satire with the same title was published by Fores on 1st October 1803 and depicted a manacled Napoleon seated back to front on a white horse. It is shown here without the original speech bubbles, which referred to the then Member of Parliament for St. Mawes, William Wyndham's opposition to the arming of Volunteers and Militia at the expense of the Regular Army, a consequence of the policies of the Addington government. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.VIIa and pl.568. £700-900
201.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
An English porcelain mug, c.1803, probably Worcester, printed in black with a scene of two cavalrymen, titled 'Death or Victory' above four lines of verse, flanked by three infantrymen and a warship, both captioned, a long restored crack, 11.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.521.

£200-300
202.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A rare creamware mug, c.1803, printed in black with a scene of John Bull riding a lion, cowering over Napoleon seated on the back of a frog, titled 'The Lion and the Frog!', the rim with a band of orange red, restoration to the foot, 12cm.

A satire published by William Holland on 30th July 1803 served as the inspiration for this print. Cf. British Museum exhibition, 'Pots with attitude: British satire on ceramics', 12th January to 11th March 2018.
£800-1200
203.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A large creamware mug, c.1803, printed in black with Napoleon standing at the edge of a harbour and asking 'Who dare stop me', inscribed beneath with 'Stop Buonaparte you must not boast, Other Work must first be Done, Britons will teach you to your cost, that from France they Will not Run', signed 'W.C.' in the print, restoration to the rim and foot, 15.2cm.

The initials WC are probably those of Walter Cockburn, 'silverman and engraver' of Sunderland. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 513a and b, 514. £250-350
204.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A creamware jug, c.1803, printed in black and decorated in coloured enamels with an oval panel titled 'An English Jack Tar giving Monsieur a Drubbing', the reverse with eleven lines of verse captioned 'The Batchelors Wish', 19.3cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.518. £400-600
205.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Staffordshire pearlware jug, c.1803, printed in brown and decorated in colours with a scene of a scrawny Napoleon being faced down by a large infantryman and pug, titled 'Facing the Enemy', signed in the print with 'T. Harley, Lane End', the reverse with a large floral spray, restoration, 13.8cm.

After the satire attributed to Isaac Cruikshank and published by Ackermann. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 530 and 531. £350-450
206.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Staffordshire pearlware jug, c.1803, printed in brown and decorated in colours with scene of John Bull leading Napoleon by a rope around his neck, titled 'John Bull giving Boney a Pull', signed in the print 'T. Harley, Lane End', the reverse with a large floral spray, a large restored crack, 15.5cm.

After the satire by Isaac Cruikshank published by Ackermann on 7th August 1803. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 536 and 537.

Provenance: ex Lewison collection, sold Phillips, 8th April 1998, lot 392.
£350-450
207.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A Staffordshire pearlware jug, c.1803, printed in brown and decorated in colours with scene of Napoleon fronting up to a Quaker gentleman in a broad hat, titled beneath with 'Bonaparte and the Quaker', signed in the print 'T. Harley, Lane End', the reverse with a large floral spray, restored, 15.8cm.

After the satire published by Piercy Roberts. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls 528 and 529.

Provenance: ex Lewison collection, sold Phillips, 8th April 1998, lot 393.
£350-450
208.    1803 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A pearlware jug, c.1803, printed in brown and decorated in colours with a scene titled 'John Bull shewing the Corsican Monkey', depicting a monkey dressed as Bonaparte on the back of a bear, the reverse with a panel inscribed with mocking address, signed in the print 'Manufactured by T. Harley Lane End', the neck with foliate bands, a little restoration to the spout, 17.5cm.

After Woodward's satire engraved by Isaac Cruikshank and published by Ackerman on 3rd September 1803. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 532, 533 and 535. £700-900
209.    1804 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A large pearlware jug, c.1804, printed in brown and hand-coloured with a figural scene titled 'Bonny in His New Clothes', the reverse with 'The Upshot or Bonny Fire', both signed in the print 'Clive Desig', beneath a neck painted in bright colours, a large footrim chip, 19.2cm.

Napoleon was proclaimed Emperor on 18th May 1804. This jug, although in the same style as those by Thomas Harley of Lane End in Staffordshire, is signed by John Henry Clive of Newfield in Tunstall, Staffordshire. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.576a, b and c, 578 and 579.

Provenance: ex Lewinson collection, sold Phillips, 8th April 1998, lot 389.

£700-900
210.    1804 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A pearlware mug, c.1804, printed in brown and decorated in colours with a scene of Napoleon hanging above a bonfire, titled 'The Upshot or Bonny Fire', signed in the print 'Clive desig', restored, 10.8cm.

See the footnote to lot 209 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.582.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 2002.

£250-350
211.    1804 GREAT INVASION SCARE
A creamware jug, c.1804, printed in black and decorated in colours with scenes entitled 'John Bull and his Companion Challenging Bonaparte and his relation', the reverse with 'Bonaparte's Last Shift', the diminutive leader beset by flying mythical creatures, beneath the spout with a simple printed flower spray, a little chipping to the spout and handle, 19.4cm.

Bonaparte's speech bubble in the first cartoon makes reference to having 'obtained the Crown', which occurred on 18th May 1804. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 584 and 585. £600-800
212.    3RD OCTOBER 1804: BRITISH SEIZE OF SPANISH TREASURE CONVOY
A large creamware jug, c.1804, printed in black with figural scenes titled 'The Dons Outwitted or John Bull in Time' and 'John Bull peppering Bonaparte to the Front and Rear', beneath the spout with a warship under sail inscribed 'Britons Never Shall be Slaves', restoration to the spout and rim cracks, 22.8cm.

After the satire of somewhat similar title by Charles Williams, published by Fores on 1st November 1804, the cartoon depicted, together with much speech, refers to the engagement by four British frigates, under the command of Captain Graham Moore, of a Spanish convoy carrying treasure from the New World to France. Although Britain and Spain were not at war Spain had, under the Treaty of St. Ildefonso of 1st October 1800, agreed to help the French. In the ensuing action, one Spanish ship was blown up, the remainder captured and their prized cargo seized. Although the news was received to popular acclaim back in Britain, a consequence of the action was a declaration of war. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 510, 586 and 589 and colour plate VIIb.
£700-1000
213.    1805 BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR
A creamware frog mug, c.1805, probably by Dawson & Co. of Sunderland, printed in black with a naval engagement scene, titled below, the interior modelled with a brown frog, some restoration, 12.2cm.

This scene was initially produced captioned for the Battle of the Nile and signed by Dawson & Co. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 478, 595a, b and c.

Provenance: with John May, September 1994.

£300-400
214.    ADMIRAL NELSON AND CAPTAIN HARDY
A Pratt ware style jug, c.1905, moulded with profile portraits of Nelson and Hardy, titled around the rim, 16cm.

The moulded portrait of Hardy is the same as that of Berry produced in Pratt ware after the Battle of the Nile in 1798. With minimal alteration it was subsequently re-issued and re-named after the Battle of Trafalgar. The mould, by now well worn, was again re-issued perhaps upon the centenary of Trafalgar. Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, pp.147-148.
£80-120
215.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A Newcastle Pottery frog mug, c.1805, the cylindrical form printed in black with sailors grieving at a tomb decorated with a portrait of Nelson, with lines of verse each side, inscribed 'Newcastle Pottery', the interior modelled with a black frog, restoration to the rim, 11.7cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.596.

Provenance: with John May, September 1994.

£300-400
216.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A large pearlware mug, c.1805, printed in grey and hand-coloured with an inscribed portrait medallion, the reverse with a scene of a ship with a portrait of George III and a banner inscribed 'Success to Commerce', four lines of verse between, heralding Nelson, restoration to the handle and foot, 13.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, col. pl. 5. £300-400
217.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A Pratt ware jug, dated 1809, moulded and painted with an apotheosis scene of Nelson in a chariot drawn by hippocampi, flanked by scenes of Britannia, Fame and Plenty, initialled TW and dated 1809 beneath the spout, restoration to the spout and handle, 15.5cm.

Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.154.
£300-400
218.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A creamware jug, c.1805, printed in red with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'Admiral Lord Nelson' above his dates, the reverse with a detailed and inscribed battle plan of Trafalgar, the spout restored, 15.4cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 167 and 168; David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 592 and 593. £250-350
219.    NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A rare Barr Flight & Barr (Worcester) jug, c.1805, printed in black with a small but finely drawn head and shoulders portrait, signed in the print 'A R Burt' (reversed), the sides with a French eagle standard, the shaft entwined with serpents, and a dove of Peace, impressed mark, 14.8cm.

This mirror-image portrait is after the recently discovered sketch of Nelson by Albin Roberts Burt, done in pencil on silk about 1802. Burt's brother, Henry Frederick, was Nelson's secretary and Burt himself was a close friend of both Sir William and Emma Hamilton. He trained initially as an engraver under Robert Threw and Benjamin Smith. Adverts affixed to the reverse of some of his works stated that he had invented a machine by which the most accurate likenesses can be taken. It is likely that in searching for a suitable posthumous portrait of Nelson this very personal likeness was settled upon by Barr Flight & Barr and reproduced, by virtue of Burt's invention, as a mirror image. There is no record of this portrait in either Richard Walker's 1998 seminal or his 1985 Regency Portraits catalogue. The recently discovered original pencil drawing was sold by Charles Miller Ltd in their Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments and Art auction on 8th November 2016 as lot 71 with a provenance described as UK private collection. £2000-3000
220.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware jug, c.1805, printed in brown with an oval portrait of Nelson, beneath the spout inscribed with his decorations, the reverse with a cartouche of Victory, the rim with military trophies, partial printed number to the base, 14.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.214, pls. 598 and 599.
£200-300
221.    1805 BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR, NELSON AND COLLINGWOOD
A pearlware jug, dated 1805, printed in brown with a cartouche of Victory inscribed 'Off Trafalgar Oct'r 21 1805', flanked by titled portraits of Nelson and Collingwood, reserved on a dense floral scroll ground, handle restored, 16.3cm.

Admiral Lord Collingwood assumed command of the Mediterranean Fleet upon Nelson's death, an appointment which was subsequently confirmed. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 601 and 603.


£200-300
222.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A creamware jug, c.1805, probably Sunderland, printed in black and decorated in colours with a named and dated portrait flanked by Britannia and Jack Tar, the reverse with a four line stanza, restored, 15.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.101 (S) for a description of this print. £200-300
223.    NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A Sunderland lustre jug, c.1825, printed in black and hand-coloured with a portrait medallion inscribed 'Lord Nelson Died 21 of October 1805', flanked by cartouches of Jack Tar and twelve lines of verse, reserved on a purplish pink lustre ground, 19.6cm.

The style of decoration and abundance of pink lustre on this jug suggest it was produced some 20 years after Nelson's death. Despite the intervening years, Nelson's memory continued to be held dear.

£300-400
224.    1805 NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A rare and large creamware jug, c.1805, the ovoid body printed in brown and decorated in colours with a vignette of a grieving Britannia holding a portrait, the reverse inscribed with Fame and lines of script titled 'Britannia's address on the Death of Lord Nelson', restored, 21.2cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.100 (P) for a description of this print. £400-600
225.    NELSON IN MEMORIAM
A Sunderland pink lustre jug, c.1813-25, printed in black with an inscribed oval portrait flanked by flags and ships, the reverse with a view of the Iron Bridge over the Wear, signed and dated Dixon & Co 1813, beneath the spout with eight lines of verse titled 'Forget Me Not', painted 'M.J. Moth, Cowes', with pink lustre bands to the rim, restoration to the spout and top of the handle, 20.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.97 (D) for a description of these pieces often produced long after Nelson's death.
£250-350
226.    LORD COLLINGWOOD
A small pearlware plate, c.1806, printed in blue with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'Lord Collingwood', within a berried border, the rim with a dense Oriental style band, restored, 16cm.

Admiral Collingwood assumed command of the Mediterranean Fleet upon Nelson's death, an appointment which was subsequently confirmed. On 9th November 1805 he was raised to the Peerage as Baron Collingwood. His early request to be relieved of this appointment was denied on the grounds that the country could not dispense with his services in the face of the ongoing French threat. In declining health, his renewed request to return to Britain was finally granted. On 7th March 1810, whilst returning to England, he died at sea and was laid to rest in St Paul's Cathedral. £120-180
227.    EARL ST VINCENT
A Wedgwood jasperware portrait plaque, 19th century, applied in white on a pale blue ground, with a head and shoulders profile, the plaque 11cm high, mounted in a later frame.

Sir John Jervis was created Earl St Vincent following his great victory over the overwhelming Spanish fleet at St Vincent on 14th February 1797. An accomplished Naval commander, he completed his last Naval engagement in 1806 at the age of 72 when in command of the Channel fleet on an expedition to Portugal.

Provenance: ex Pugh Collection, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 26 April 2001, lot 51 and where described 'impressed both Vincent and marked on the reverse'. Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.297 for an earlier version of the same likeness.
£200-300
228.    1805 IMPEACHMENT OF LORD MELVILLE
A small pearlware mug, mid 19th century, printed in brown and hand-coloured with a scene of three figures titled 'A North Country Transfer or Abraham Newland Alarm', restored, 9.1cm.

A satire by Isaac Cruikshank of the same title was published on 5th April 1805 and referred to the admission by Alexander Trotter, the Navy's Paymaster, that public money had been transferred from the Bank of England into his private bank account to enable him to speculate; albeit without loss of public money other than that of interest. Abraham Newland was the Chief Cashier of the Bank of England. In the 1806 proceedings against Viscount Melville, on whose watch as Treasurer of the British Navy this had happened, Melville was acquitted.


£150-250
229.    1803 BATTLE OF ASSAYE
A Copeland & Garrett pearlware plate, c.1840, printed in black with an equestrian battle scene, circled by a laurel wreath with a banner inscribed 'Col. Maxwell's Last Charge at Assye', printed and impressed marks, 21.6cm.

In the second Anglo-Maratha war, the Battle of Assaye on 23rd September 1803 was a turning point which represented the Duke of Wellington's first major victory. During the battle, a detachment of British cavalry under Lieutenant Colonel Patrick Maxwell was ordered into action. Routing the swarming attackers, Maxwell continued his charge into the Maratha infantry despite the guns to his left driving them and the guns backwards across the Juah, thus defeating a combined Maratha army of Daulat Scindia and the Raja of Berar, but losing his life in the process. The depiction here was engraved by J H Engleheart after A Cooper.
£50-80
230.    WARREN HASTINGS
A miniature glass Tassie-type portrait, 1st half 19th century, finely carved in white and applied to an amber glass ground, the plaque 3.7cm high, mounted in an ebonised frame.

Hastings, born in 1732, became the first Governor of Bengal from 1772 until 1785. In 1795 he was acquitted by the House of Lords after a seven year trial for cruelty during his Indian administration. Retiring to Gloucestershire, he was appointed a Privy Councillor in 1814 and died in 1818.

£150-250
231.    1807 WILLIAM PITT IN MEMORIAM
An enamel paste and glass portrait plaque, dated 1807, designed by Catherine Andras for James Tassie, mounted on a blue glass panel, signed 'C Andras 1807', the plaque 9.8cm high, mounted in a gilt metal frame.
£300-500
232.    WILLIAM PITT AND CHARLES JAMES FOX
A pair of small Tassie-type glass miniature portraits, c.1806, each head and shoulders profile carved in white on a black glass ground, mounted together in an ebonised frame, a repair to the portrait of Fox, each plaque 2.5cm.

Pitt (the Younger) and Fox were staunch political adversaries who both died whilst still in office in 1806, Fox on 13th September.
£300-400
233.    CHARLES JAMES FOX
A circular Pratt ware plaque, c.1806, moulded with a head and shoulders portrait of the politician, after the 1782 portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds, painted in a typical palette, 12.7cm.

Cf. John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.132.

£400-600
234.    CHARLES JAMES FOX
A large Turner dry-bodied stoneware jug, c.1809, printed in brown and decorated in colours with a named portrait inscribed with four lines of verse, the reverse with an allegory of Britannia holding aloft the cap of Liberty, a worn Sheffield plate mount to the rim stamped 'Tho. Law & Co', impressed Turner mark, 241mm.

Provenance: British Political Commemoratives: 1741 to 1991 Collection, sold by Historical & Collectable, 12th September 1999, lot 516C.
£1000-1500
235.    CHARLES JAMES FOX
A Minton biscuit porcelain figure, c.1835, after John Raphael Smith, depicted seated in a chair and holding a scroll, raised on a pierced, scrolled base, a scroll lacking beneath his chair, 20cm.

Smith painted a number of portraits of Fox seated in his study at St Anne's Hill, Chertsey including a posthumous version. Cf. Richard Dennis, The Parian Phenomenon, fig. 181 where a drawing of shape 72 from the Minton Design Book is illustrated. £300-400
236.    17TH FEBRUARY 1807: GORDON'S SUCCESS FOR WORCESTER IN THE GENERAL ELECTION.
A fine Chamberlain's Worcester jug, dated 1807, inscribed in gilt within berried laurel swags, flanked by the monogram 'BJ' in gilt, the neck with a gilt foliate design on an orange ground, gilt Chamberlain's Worcester mark to the base, 18.5cm.

In a letter to the Times published the day following the election, William Gordon expressed gratitude to the electors of Worcester.

Provenance: with Stockspring Antiques, June 2015.

£700-900
237.    1807 GENERAL ELECTION IN THE CONSTITUENCY OF YORKSHIRE
A pearlware jug, c.1807, painted in brown with the inscription 'Wilberforce & Milton. No Lascelles', the neck banded in yellow and green with brown foliate decoration, some restoration to the rim, 12.1cm.

Yorkshire had not hosted a contested election since 1741. The amount of money spent by the three candidates became the greatest in any pre-Reform election. Earl Fitzwilliam is recorded as spending £99,000 and the Earl of Harewood for his younger son Henry Lascelles spent £93,600. In the event Henry Lascelles for the Tories was narrowly beaten by William Wilberforce, an Independent, and Lord Milton, a Whig.

£300-500
238.    ORANGE JUMPER
A Don Pottery pearlware jug, c.1809, printed in brown and decorated in bright colours with figures of a man holding a aloft a hat with a ticket inscribed 'Milton', beneath the spout with a scroll bearing seven lines of verse, restoration to the spout, handle and base, 18.5cm.

A pugilist and horse breaker by the name of Mellish, who also went under the name of Orange Jumper, was employed by Lord Milton's father, Earl Fitzwilliam, to do his bidding during the 1807 General Election in Yorkshire. Orange was the Fitzwilliam family colour. After a satire by James Gillray published by Hannah Humphrey on 6th March 1809. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.267 and 268.

£400-600
239.    1809 JOSEPH HANSON AND INDUSTRIAL UNREST
A large pearlware jug, dated 1810, printed in purple and hand-decorated in colours with a scene titled 'The Jolly Hatters Hanson For Ever', the reverse with a scene titled 'Charity', beneath the spout inscribed 'WS Constantine 1810' in silver, the rim with a silver lustre band, restoration to the spout and handle, 18.7cm.

Considered a dangerous agitator, Hanson was imprisoned in 1809 for sedition in addressing a mass meeting of handloom weavers. 39,600 people each contributed one penny for his defence fund and upon his release from prison he was greeted by a large body of Manchester weavers who carried him to the top of Manchester Hill.
£300-400
240.    1809 MARY ANNE CLARKE SCANDAL
A yellow ground pearlware jug, c.1809, printed en grisaille with portraits of Colonel Wardle to two sides, one of Miss Taylor beneath the spout, titled and reserved within painted black borders, reserved on a rich canary yellow ground, some restoration to the spout, 16.6cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 616 and 617.
£300-400
241.    1809 MARY ANNE CLARKE SCANDAL
A rare creamware mug, c.1809, the slender cylindrical body printed in black with a cartoon depicting the Duke of York and Albany seated between Mary Anne Clarke and Mary Anne Taylor, a chip beneath the foot, 11.5cm.
£600-800
242.    1809 MARY ANNE CLARK SCANDAL
A creamware mug, c.1809, the cylindrical body printed in black and decorated in colours with a satirical cartoon depicting Mary Anne Clarke and the Duke of York and Albany centred by an inverted Bishop's mitre, above the inscription 'He's wrong who Terms the Duke a lawless spark, For every Bishop is allowed his Clark', some restoration to the foot, 15.2cm.

The Duke of York, thanks to the influence of his father George III also the Elector of Hanover, had within a year of his birth been elected to the valuable Bishopric of Osnaburg. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 619a, b and c. £600-800
243.    1809 MARY ANNE CLARKE SCANDAL
A creamware jug, dated 1809, printed in black with a three-quarter length portrait of the famed mistress, the reverse with eight lines of verse beginning 'Oh! woman, lovely woman!', beneath the spout painted 'Sarah Weeller 1809' in silver lustre, restoration to the rim and foot, 14.2cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.23.
£400-600
244.    SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A Sunderland creamware mug, c.1810, the cylindrical body printed in black with a portrait oval engraved by T. Robson for Phillips & Co., inscribed 'Sir Francis Burdett, the Independent Champion of British Freedom', a little good restoration to the rim, 11.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.631. £400-600
245.    SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A small silver lustre jug, c.1810, printed in red with a head and shoulders portrait titled ' The determined enemy of corruption & the constitutional friend of his Sovereign', the reverse with an oval panel detailing his arrest on 6th April 1810, reserved on a silver lustre ground with dense foliate design, the spout restored, 10.2cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.626 and 627.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, November 2000.
£150-200
246.    SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A yellow ground pearlware jug, printed in grey with a portrait above the banner inscribed 'The determined enemy of corruption & the constitutional friend of his Sovereign', within silver lustre borders, 14.4cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.62. £150-200
247.    SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A pearlware jug, c.1810, moulded with a half-length portrait to one side, with a banner impressed 'Sir Francis Burdett Bart', the reverse with Liberty seated and holding a Phyrigian cap, brightly enamelled in a limited palette, restoration to the spout and rim, 14.2cm.
£150-200
248.    SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A pearlware jug, c.1810, printed in black with allegorical figures around a portrait panel below the banner 'S F Burdett', the reverse with six lines of verse, with a trellis foliate border in silver resist lustre to the rim, restoration to the foot and base, 15.4cm.
£150-250
249.    GEORGE III
A Barr Worcester vase, c.1800-10, the flared form applied with ring handles and printed in black with a profile portrait titled 'K. George ye III'd', the reverse with figures before Classical ruins, faint incised B to the base, 156mm.

This profile of George III is an enlarged copy of Robert Hancock's work done in about 1761, itself adapted from the engraving by James McArdell after the painting by Jeremiah Meyer. While the incised B mark was traditionally used between 1792 and 1807, it is possible that the decoration was added a little later to commemorate the Golden Jubilee. £700-900
250.    GEORGE III
A rare rectangular pearlware plaque, c.1810, moulded and painted in Portobello colours with a head and shoulders profile portrait of the monarch at a younger age, each corner with a floral motif, the integral frame lined in green and black, pierced with two suspension holes, restored, 17cm high.

This plaque is similar in style to those produced at the Portobello factory in celebration of George IV's visit to Scotland in 1821. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.37 where the author suggests that these youthful depictions may have been paired with contemporary likenesses in celebration of George III's Golden Jubilee, as happened again in 1887 for Victoria.

£250-350
251.    GEORGE III GOLDEN JUBILEE
A Wedgwood creamboat, c.1810, the elongated octagonal body printed with a chain medallion border suspending a portrait roundel, flanked by Oriental flower sprays reserved on a dense orange foliate scroll ground, restored, 14.6cm long.

Cf. Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 537 for a cup, cover and stand from the same service. Also, the subject of an article by H. Clifford Smith concerning George III's Jubilee Tea-set in the Country Life magazine, 15th December 1944.
£200-300
252.    GEORGE III GOLDEN JUBILEE
An English porcelain jug, c.1809, the fluted body printed in blue with a view of a jail inscribed for the amnesty and commencement of the jubilee year on 25th October 1809, beneath a representation of Britannia and Charity in the heavens, the reverse with the Royal coat of arms, gilt Greek key border to the rim, cracks, 17.6cm.

The statue depicted is that of George III on horseback at the junction of Pembroke Place and London Road in Liverpool, which was erected by public subscription in celebration of the jubilee; at the same time the amnesty was granted to debtors, war veterans, deserters and prisoners of war (other than the French). Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.36 (different inscription), and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.621. £200-300
253.    GEORGE III GOLDEN JUBILEE
A Chamberlain's Worcester two handled vase, c.1810, painted to each side with a silhouette profile portrait, one side inscribed 'Integrity's his shield', the other 'Dear to his subjects', the neck gilded and with yellow highlights, some restoration to the foot, 19.4cm. £250-350
254.    1808 SPANISH ALLIANCE AGAINST NAPOLEON
A creamware jug, c.1809, printed in black with a scene entitled 'A Spanish Patriot', the reverse with a satire titled 'The Apotheosis of Bonaparte', with John Bull on his knees before the hanging Frenchman, restoration to the spout and base, 15cm.

Following the abdication and imprisonment of Ferdinand VII on 6th May 1808, the appointment of Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain was unacceptable to the majority of Spanish people who looked to Wellington and Britain for support. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 525 and 527.

£250-350
255.    NAPOLEON BONAPARTE
A creamware propaganda jug, c.1810-20, printed in orange with a seven headed monster, inscription, legend and interpretation of the name 'Buonaparte', the reverse with ten lines of verse, some restoration, 14.3cm.

A satire published by Ackerman on 22nd July 1808 depicts the same seven headed monster, here produced with numeric formula and a degree of licence to equate Napoleon's name to be equivalent to the 666 number of the devil. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 604 and 605.
£200-300
256.    16TH JANUARY 1809: SIR JOHN MOORE IN MEMORIAM
A black basalt teapot, c.1809, the navette form moulded with a scene of Sir John's death, the reverse with a depiction of Fame and Britannia inscribing his name and dates on a tablet, reserved on a basketweave ground, the cover lacking, 28.3cm across.

Lieutenant General Sir John Moore was the hero of Corunna, where he was fatally wounded but lived to see the victory. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.171.
£100-150
257.    DANIEL LAMBERT AND NAPOLEON
A large creamware jug, c.1809, printed in black with Napoleon standing beside a corpulent figure, titled 'Bone and Flesh or John Bull in Moderate Condition', the reverse with Britannia standing on the seashore, good restoration to the rim, 23cm.

Born in 1770, Daniel Lambert had by 1806 become a curiosity on account of his weight and size. He died in 1809, at which time he was five feet eleven inches in height and weighing just short of 53 stone. A satire of the same name was published by Walker on 15th April 1806. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 607 where the author concludes this image of Britannia probably dates from 1809 (see lot 258).
£800-1200
258.    VISCOUNT WELLINGTON
A creamware jug, c.1809, printed in black with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'The Rt. Hnble Lord Visct Wellington K B &c.' within a border of military trophies, the reverse with Britannia and a lion standing on the shore, restoration to the lower half and spout, 24.7cm.

The title Viscount was conferred upon Wellington on 4th September 1809. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 606 and 607.


£400-600
259.    PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN
A creamware jug, c.1810, printed in black and hand-coloured with a scene of a Frenchman surrendering to a Scottish soldier, titled 'One of the 71st taking a French Officer prisoner in Portugal', the reverse with 'John Bull and his Companion Challenging Bonaparte and his relation', beneath the spout with a canal scene of a fly boat and horses with related speech bubbles, the spout restored, 20.4cm.

The 71st (Glasgow Highland) Regiment of Foot saw action in the British victory over the French at the Battle of Vimiera in Portugal on 21st August 1808. They returned to the Peninsula in 1810 before finally driving the French out of Portugal the following year. £700-900
260.    PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1810, printed in red and black to two sides with a badge named 'The Spanish Patriots Cockade', beneath the spout painted with the initials 'JB' within blue laurel leaf swags, some restoration, 15.5cm. £120-180
261.    16TH MAY 1811: BATTLE OF ALBUERA
An English porcelain cylindrical mug, c.1811, painted with a colourful battle scene with distant mountains, within a wide octagonal gilt border, titled 'Albuera' in red to the underside, a star crack to the base, 11.1cm.

Albuera is located in Spain, close to the Portuguese border, and was the scene of a battle on 16th May 1811 in which a mixed British, Spanish and Portuguese corps engaged the French. Indecisive in its outcome, it remained one of the bloodiest battles of the Peninsular Campaign. £250-350
262.    LORD WELLINGTON AND PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN BATTLES
A small blue and white transferware plate, c.1811, printed with a head and shoulders portrait, inscribed 'Lord Wellington' and with the names of three battles, 11.7cm.

The Battle of Vimiera was fought on 21st August 1808; Talavera on 27th and 28th July 1809 and Albuera on 16th May 1811. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.172.

£120-180
263.    1812 EARL WELLINGTON
A small pearlware jug, c.1812, moulded and painted to two sides with sprays of hops and barley, beneath the spout with a named head and shoulders profile in military uniform, the rim with a silver lustre band, restored, 12cm.

An Earldom was conferred upon Wellington in February 1812 following the Battle of Ciudad Rodrigo and he was made a Marquess in August 1812 following the Battle of Salamanca. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.105 (c) for a description of this jug.

£150-200
264.    MARQUESS OF WELLINGTON
A yellow ground pearlware jug, c.1812, printed in grey with a portrait of Wellington in the Classical style, inscribed 'Marquis Wellington', the reverse with crowns and feathers around the flowers of the Union, the rim with silver lustre bands, some restoration near the foot, 14cm.

Wellington was made a Marquess in August 1812.
£200-300
265.    MARQUESS OF WELLINGTON
A large creamware jug, c.1812, printed in black and decorated in colours with an equestrian portrait with a view of Salamanca in the background, titled 'Marquis Wellington', the reverse with a warship under sail, beneath the spout with a vignette of a country mansion left in black, some restoration to the rim, 21.9cm,

Wellington was victorious at the Battle of Salamanca fought, on 22nd July 1812, for which the title of Marquess was conferred upon him the following month. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.175. £300-400
266.    21ST JUNE 1813: BATTLE OF VITTORIA
A pearlware jug, c.1813, printed in black and decorated in colours with an equestrian portrait inscribed 'Field Marshal Wellington, Vittoria', the reverse with an oval panel detailing the battle honours, the rim with a silver resist lustre floral border, the spout restored, a star crack to the base, 14.5cm.

French casualties following victory at Vittoria were fewer than they might have been on account of many British soldiers, rather than pursuing the enemy, turning to plunder the abandoned French wagons which contained the 'loot of a Kingdom', an incident which enraged Wellington. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.173.

£200-300
267.    21ST JUNE 1813; BATTLE OF VITTORIA
A salt-glazed stoneware jug, c.1813, sprigged in white with a named equestrian portrait of Wellington being hailed by a soldier waving a ribbon inscribed 'Vittoria', the reverse with figures hauling a captured cannon towards a chest marked 'Plunder', all on a drab ground beneath a blue rim, the handle formed as a lion head and paws issuing from a ropetwist, rim faults, a crack to the base of the handle, 18.5cm.

See footnote to lot 266.
£200-300
268.    21ST JUNE 1813; WELLINGTON'S VICTORY AT VITTORIA
A large black basalt teapot and cover, c.1813, the tall form moulded with a lion's head spout and serpent handle, one side with an oval panel inscribed with battle honours and dated for Vittoria, the reverse with a cartouche depicting Britannia placing a garland upon a named bust of Wellington impressed 'Viresque Acquiret Eundo', a chip to the cover, 28.5cm across. (2)

The inscription 'Viresque Acquirit Eundo' is taken from Virgil and roughly translates to 'With Strength by going'. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.174.


£150-250
269.    WELLINGTON AND THE PENINSULAR WARS
A pearlware jug, c.1810, beneath the spout inscribed with nine lines of verse extolling the Duke of Wellington, above 'William Twigg, Longford', flanked by purple printed panels depicting Hope and Charity, the rim with a silver resist band of fruiting grapevine, three short rim cracks, 16.5cm.

A farmer and publican named William Twigg is recorded on the 1851 census as living in Longford, Derbyshire (where he was born c.1789). He died in Longford on 13th February 1858. £150-250
270.    9TH SEPTEMBER 1811: ANN MOORE OF TUTBURY
A pearlware jug, c.1811, printed in black with a portrait of Ann Moore, the fasting woman of Tutbury, in her bed, inscribed with her name and dates, the reverse with an oval cartouche detailing the history of her fast, some restoration, 13.4cm. Together with a photocopy of an article taken from the British Medical Journal of 13th February 1913 entitled 'One Hundred Years Ago'. (2)

Born in 1761, the attractive Ann Moore was married by the time she was 27 and had a large family before her husband deserted her. Falling into poverty she moved to Tutbury in Staffordshire in 1800. By 1806 she was beginning to attract attention and financial reward for her long periods of fasting and, since 17th July 1807, her complete abstinence from food. This phenomenon was the subject of two medical examinations, the results of the first being published in the Medical and Physical Journal of February 1813. Following the subsequent examination commencing 21st April 1813 Ann Moore confessed to her fraud in that she had received liquid food from her daughter when kissed both morning and evening.
£250-350
271.    11TH MAY 1812: ASSASSINATION OF SPENCER PERCEVAL
A creamware frog mug, c.1812, printed in black with a portrait of the assassin, John Bellingham, titled and flanked by fabric swags, the interior modelled with a painted frog clambering up one side, extensively oversprayed, 11.8cm.

Spencer Perceval held the offices of Attorney General and Chancellor of the Exchequer before becoming Prime Minister on 4th October 1809. Bellingham, a merchant broker, had journeyed to Russia where he was imprisoned twice between 1804 and October 1808. Returning to Britain the following year, Bellingham petitioned Parliament for compensation for what he considered his unreasonable imprisonment but this was not forthcoming. On the evening of 11th May 1812 as the Prime Minister entered the lobby of the House of Commons Bellingham shot him dead. At his Old Bailey trial on 15th May, Bellingham said his preference had been to shoot the British Ambassador to Russia but went on to say 'I trust that this serious lesson will operate as a warning to all future ministers'. Bellingham was found guilty and hanged on 18th May 1812. Perceval, the only British Prime Minister to be assassinated, having been laid to rest on 16th May. £300-500
272.    11TH MAY 1812: ASSASSINATION OF SPENCER PERCEVAL
A buff-coloured pearlware jug, c.1812, printed in black with a named head and shoulders profile of John Bellingham (Perceval's assassin), the reverse with an inscribed oval panel, a long restored rim crack, 13.6cm.

Accompanied by a cutting from The Times newspaper titled 'On This Day, May 1812' being a recount of the execution of John Bellingham. See footnote to lot 271 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 633 and 634.
£300-500
273.    14TH SEPTEMBER 1812: NAPOLEON ENTERS MOSCOW
A massive pearlware jug, c.1812, printed in grey and decorated in colours beneath the spout with a view of Moscow burning titled 'Hourrah Your Serene Highness,' the sides decorated with figural scenes titled 'A Russian Boor returning from his field sports' and 'Specimen of Russian Chopping Blocks', inscribed in both English and Russian, a little retouching to the enamel, 26.6cm.

On 24th June 1812 Napoleon crossed the Neman River with a force of 685,000 men. Following the French victory at the Battle of Smolensk between the 16th and 18th August, the Russians practiced a 'scorched earth' policy as they retreated. Having caught up with them by 7th September, Napoleon engaged Field Marshal Mikhail Kutuzov's Russian army at Borodino in what became the bloodiest battle of the Napoleonic Wars, with a total of 72,000 lives being lost. One week later Napoleon entered a deserted Moscow which the Russians torched the following day. With no peace proposal forthcoming from the Russians and French failure under Murat's command at the Battle of Tarutino on 18th October, Napoleon fled Moscow the following day. There followed the Battle of Maloyaroslavets on 24th October which, although a modest victory for the French, did not stop Napoleon turning what remained of his Grande Armée west. The hideous Russian winter took its toll and by the time Napoleon crossed the Berezina River in late November a force of just 27,000 soldiers remained. The salutation 'Hurrah Your Serene Highness' refers to Prince Kutuzov. A translation of the old Russian script reads 'Bringing home a bunch of spillikins for the pleasure of the children' and 'There were hordes of you weren't there? Well, that's the lot! That's what you were up to, trying to hack your way through; in future you won't give any trouble'. Both are after the satires published by Hannah Humphreys on 8th January 1813 being Cruickshank's rework of the original cartoon by Terebenev published in Russia in November 1812. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 650 to 660.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 1997.
£2000-3000
274.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1812-15, printed in black and enamelled in colours with two different cartoons of Napoleon on his knees before men wielding axes, one titled 'Anticipation for Boney', the other 'Specimen of Russian chopping Blocks', the neck painted with foliage and berries, restoration to the spout and rim, 13.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 659, 661 and 695.
£250-350
275.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1812, printed in black and well coloured with the same detailed cartoon titled 'Jack Frost Attacking Boney in Russia', with silver lustre band to the rim, 13.8cm.

After a satire of the same name by William Elmes published by Thomas Tegg in November 1812. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 678 and 679.
£300-400
276.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIA CAMPAIGN
A rare pearlware jug, c.1812, printed in black and well coloured with cartoons titled 'Murat Reviewing the Grand Army' and 'Boney Tir'd of Wars Alarms Flies for the Safety of His Darlings Arms', the rim banded in silver lustre, 14.8cm.

On abandoning his army on 5th December, Napoleon entrusted its command to Murat, his brother-in-law. The cartoons here are after two satires, each by Cruikshank and published by Walker & Knight in January 1813. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 680 to 684.

£500-800
277.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1812-15, printed in black and decorated in colours with two oval cartoons, to one side titled 'Russian Frenchman & Bear dancing a Scotch Reel', the other ' The Narrow Escape of Boney through a window', reserved on a yellow ground, the neck with a black band of foliage, some cracking, 14cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 690 and 691.

Provenance: ex Drakard collection, B55 PEP615.
£250-350
278.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1815, printed in black and decorated in colours with two cartoons, one of Russian soldiers on horseback, titled 'Cossack mode of Attack', the other of Napoleon on horseback, titled 'Boney's Return from Russia to Paris', the rim with silver lustre bands, restoration to the spout and rim, 13.9cm.

Cossack Mode of Attack is after the engraving of the same title published by Samuel Knight on 1st January 1813. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 636, 637 and 692.
£250-350
279.    1812 NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware jug, c.1812-15, printed in black and well coloured with detailed cartoons titled 'Little Bony sneaking into Paris' and 'Jack Frost attacking Bony in Russia', on a buff coloured glaze with silver banding to the rim, a chip to the rim, 14.8cm.

After the satires both by William Elmes and published by Thomas Tegg. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 678, 679, 685 and 686.
£250-350
280.    1813 NAPOLEON'S FAILED RUSSIAN AND PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN
A rare pearlware jug, c.1813, printed in black and well coloured with two cartoons, one of Napoleon in an altercation with the Prussian eagle, the other with five figures riding on the back of a long horse, titled 'French post Extraordinary from Moscow to Paris', the neck painted with foliage and red berries, restoration to the spout, 13.8cm.

George Cruikshank's satire published by Hannah Humphrey on 26th March 1813, copied from the original Russian engraving, served as the inspiration for this potter's adapted version of Napoleon's homecoming. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 694 and 695. Joseph Bonaparte's defeat at Vittoria on 21st June 1813, his subsequent abdication of the Spanish crown and return to France is here commemorated by use of the earlier published satire by Rowlandson. £400-600
281.    TSAR ALEXANDER AND NAPOLEON'S RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A pearlware saucer dish, c.1813, printed in black with a scene of a Cossack and a French soldier holding a named portrait of Alexander III, the French standard lying on the ground, a 4.5cm rim crack, 20.5cm.
£80-120
282.    NAPOLEON'S FAILED RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN
A Pratt ware 'Bear Baiting' jug and cover, c.1813, the bear hugging a miniature Napoleon to his chest, depicted as the Corsican Monkey and wearing a hat titled 'Boney', the bear's collar inscribed 'Bon'parte and his Friend', chipping to the toes, 25cm. (2)

A satire titled 'Boney and His Army in Winter Quarters' by Charles Williams (published by Walker in March 1807) depicts the Russian Bear carrying Boney away following the indecisive Battle of Eylau on 7th and 8th February 1807. Another titled 'The Bone of Contention or the English Bulldog and the Corsican Monkey' by Charles Williams (published by S W Fores on 14th June 1803) depicts Boney as the Corsican Monkey. Together these two caricatures may have served as inspiration for the potter in this portrayal of Napoleon following his disastrous Russian campaign. £1500-2000
283.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A creamware jug for the American market, c.1812-15, printed in black with an inscribed naval engagement, the reverse with a named portrait of Commandant Perry, beneath the spout with the American eagle holding a shield bearing the stars and stripes, pink lustre rim, restored, 18.6cm.

In July and August 1812 two Naval engagements occurred between USS Constitution and a number of British vessels. Following the American success on Lake Erie on 10th September 1813, Commandant Oliver Perry reported 'We have met the enemy; and they are ours'.
£250-350
284.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A Staffordshire pearlware jug for the American market, c.1812-15, printed in black with two differing naval engagement scenes, titles including 'Second View of Com. Perry's Victory', signed in the print for 'Bentley, Wear and Bourne', restoration to the spout and rim, 18.5cm.

The scene referred to on the reverse, engraved by Bentley, Wear & Bourne of Shelton in Staffordshire, occurred on 17th July 1812 when USS Constitution outran British warships. See also the footnote to lot 283.

£300-400
285.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A pearlware lustre jug for the American market, c.1813-15, printed in black with named portraits of Captain Isaac Hull of the Constitution and General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, depicted beside ships and other maritime motifs, with pink lustre decoration, restored, 16.4cm.

Hull took command of the USS Constitution from 17th June 1810 and was instrumental in achieving victory over HMS Guerriere on 19th August 1812. Pike was killed when leading the victorious assault on Fort York in Canada on 27th April 1813. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl. 704.
£250-350
286.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A Staffordshire creamware lustre jug for the American market, c.1812-15, printed in black with inscribed oval panels of naval engagements, signed in the print for Bentley, Wear and Bourne, reserved on a pale green ground with pink lustre decoration, some restoration, 14cm.

The engravings by Bentley, Wear & Bourne of Shelton in Staffordshire depict the incidents on 18th October 1812 when the American frigate Wasp defeated HMS Frolic, and three days prior when USS United States, commanded by Stephen Decatur, triumphed over HMS Macedonia. Upon the surrender of Captain John Carden, she was taken as a prize and sailed into Newport Harbour to become the only British frigate ever to be taken into an American port. She remained in American service for a further twenty years.
£250-350
287.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A small creamware lustre jug, c.1812-15, printed in black with named portraits of Decatur and Lawrence within borders of ships and other maritime motifs, with pink lustre bands, some damages, 11.5cm.

Stephen Decatur commanded the USS United States from 1813 to 1814. Captain James Lawrence of the USS Chesapeake engaged HMS Shannon on 1st June 1813 but was mortally wounded. Before dying on 4th June, he exclaimed 'Don't surrender the ship'. In the event, the Royal Navy sailed Chesapeake into Halifax where she was repaired and continued to sail under the British flag as HMS Chesapeake.
£200-300
288.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A creamware lustre jug for he American market, c.1812, printed in black with named portraits titled 'Captain Jones of the Macedonian' and 'We have met the Enemy and they are ours Perry', the two officers pictures with ships and other maritime motifs, with narrow pink lustre bands, a chip to the rim, wear and scratching, 18.6cm.

Following the conflict with the USS United States, HMS Macedonia surrendered and was taken as a prize to Newport Harbour under the new command of Captain Jacob Jones. See footnote to lot 286. In the Battle of Lake Erie on 10th September 1813, Commodore Oliver Perry was captain of USS Lawrence until she was disabled by the British Navy, whereupon he transferred to USS Niagara concluding the battle in victory. See footnote to lots 283 and 286.
£200-300
289.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
An Enoch Wood & Sons transferware plate for the American market, c.1820-30, printed in blue with a naval scene titled 'Commodore MacDonnough's Victory', the border with seashells, faint impressed mark to the underside, 193mm.

Thomas Macdonough was commander of the Lake Champlain squadron and overcame the British navy on 11th September 1814.
£80-120
290.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A Staffordshire pearlware lustre jug for the American market, c.1814-16, printed in black with two naval engagements titled 'The Wasp and Reindeer' and 'Com Macdonough's Victory at Lake Champlain', signed in the print for 'Bentley, Wear and Bourne', with narrow pink lustre bands, a large filled hole to the base, 19cm.

Engravings by Bentley, Wear & Bourne of Shelton in Staffordshire depict closing scenes of the campaign of Lake Champlain on 11th September 1814 in which the Americans were victorious. See footnote to lot 291. Also, the action on 28th June 1814 in the English Channel between the USS Wasp and the outgunned HMS Reindeer. £250-350
291.    THE 1812 WAR WITH AMERICA
A Staffordshire pearlware jug for the American market, c.1812, printed in black on a drab ground with naval engagements titled 'The Constitution in close action with the Guerriere' and 'The Constitution taking the Cyane and Levant', restoration to the spout and rim, 15.8cm.

Engravings by Bentley, Wear & Bourne of Shelton in Staffordshire depict the engagement on 19th August 1812 between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere, (see lot 285) and 'The Constitution Taking Cyane and the Levant', an engagement that took place some hundred miles East of Madeira on 20th February 1815. This second engagement was some three days after the Treaty of Ghent had been ratified in America, something of which the combatants were unaware.
£250-350
292.    14TH FEBRUARY 1813: PRINCE REGENT AND PRINCESS OF WALES
A rare pearlware jug, c.1813, printed in black and decorated in colours with figural cartoons titled 'Regent Valentine' and 'Boney sneaking into Paris at Midnight', the rim with a painted red and black foliate band, restoration to the spout and front of body, 15cm.

A letter from the Princess of Wales to the Prince Regent, requesting greater access to Charlotte, passed unread between the couple on two occasions until published by Caroline in the Morning Chronicle. An agreed visit for Charlotte to see her mother on 11th February failed to materialise and then, on the 14th, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool advised Caroline that this was on account of her publishing the letter. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.38 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.687. £300-400
293.    1813 LE BRUN DEPARTING HOLLAND
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1813, printed in black and decorated in colours with scenes of figures titled 'Le Brun Leaving Holland' and 'Cossack Mode of Attack', beneath a wide silver lustre border, the spout restored, 14.6cm.

Following Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Leipzig in October 1813 Charles-Francois Lebrun (Napoleon's appointed Governor-General of the Netherlands) fled. Willem Frederik, Prince of Orange landed in Holland on 30th November. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.711.

£250-350
294.    LORDS REDESDALE AND MOIRA AND THE INSOLVENT DEBTORS RELIEF ACT
An octagonal pearlware lustre jug, c.1813-17, printed in red with an oval panel honouring the two Lords and their bill, with silver lustre and red enamel flower sprays, restoration to the spout, 16.4cm.

Baron Redesdale, a barrister and Tory MP, aided by Lord Moira, introduced a bill in 1811 for the relief of insolvent debtors. It received Royal assent on 1st December 1813. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.632

Provenance: sold 28th November 1999, British Political Commemoratives 1741 to 1991, lot 524D.
£200-300
295.    NAPOLEON, BALLOONING AND THE IRON BRIDGE
A Sunderland creamware jug, dated 1813, printed in black and decorated in colours with scene titled 'The Ascent of the Aerial Balloon' depicting figures including Napoleon Bonaparte, the reverse with a dated view of the Iron Bridge over the Wear, eight lines of pious verse beneath the spout, signed 'Phillips & Co. Sunderland Pottery' within the print, restoration to the handle and spout, 22cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.709.
£500-800
296.    APRIL 1814 NAPOLEON DE-THRONED
A Cambrian pearlware jug, c.1814, printed in black and hand-coloured with a continuous cartoon of characters including Bonaparte each with speech bubbles, signed in the print 'Engraved J. Brindley', the neck inscribed 'Bonaparte Dethron'd April 1st 1814', restoration to the rim, 13.3cm.

The Allies entered Paris on 31st March 1814 and whilst Napoleon did not abdicate until 6th April, clearly potters could not resist the temptation of declaring April Fool's Day that of his downfall. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 712a, b and c.
£300-400
297.    1814 PEACE OF PARIS
A Cambrian (Dillwyn & Co) yellow ground pearlware jug, c.1814, printed in red with a continuous cartoon of characters and speech bubbles, the neck inscribed 'Peace' and 'Plenty', indistinctly signed in the print, restoration to the spout and a body crack, 14cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 716a and b and 717.
£250-350
298.    30TH MAY 1814: PEACE OF PARIS
A Bristol pearlware mug, c.1814, printed in brown and decorated in colours with two Classical maidens flanking a tablet inscribed 'Peace of Europe signed at Paris May 30, 1814', the sides with grapevine sprays, signed in the print 'Bristol Pottery', 11cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, col. pl.6; and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.721. £250-350
299.    1814 PEACE OF PARIS
An English porcelain teacup and saucer, c.1814, printed in purple, the saucer with putti drawing a figure in a chariot holding a cornucopia and a flag titled Louis XVIII, the cup with putti reading beside a banner inscribed 'Wellington for ever', within silver lustre and blue bands, 13.8cm. (2)

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, page 108 for a description of these prints.
£60-100
300.    1814 PEACE OF PARIS
A pearlware mug, c.1814-15, printed in purple on a drab ground with twelve lines of verse mentioning Wellington and 'Lewis', the rim with a pink lustre band, restored, 8.7cm.

Following Napoleon's abdication, the Peace of Paris was signed on 30th May, and the British public subsequently demanded more action in the hostilities against the United States. The Treaty of Ghent, ending the British and American hostilities in the War of 1812, was finally ratified on 17th February 1815. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.720. £120-180
301.    ENDING OF THE NAPOLEONIC WARS
Two English porcelain armorial jugs in two sizes, c.1814, painted en grisaille, the larger with portraits of the Prince of Orange and Sir John Moore, the smaller with Marshall Prince Blucher and the Crown Prince of Sweden, all allied heroes of the Napoleonic Wars, each named in gilt script, beneath the spout with the crest of an ostrich carrying a horseshoe and the motto 'Never Despair' possibly for the Scottish family of Haddaway, all reserved on a lilac ground, restoration to the larger jug, 18cm max. (2)

Provenance: the larger jug with John May, September 1995.
£500-800
302.    DUKE OF WELLINGTON AND BARON HILL
A pair of Coalport jugs, c.1814, each printed in purple and decorated in colours with portrait ovals, reserved on a white ground within gilt foliate borders, the underside of one titled 'Lord Hill' in blue script, one handle broken and restuck, the other jug with chips to the spout, 16.5cm.

Rowland Hill was a distinguished soldier under Wellington at Salamanca and later during the Peninsular campaign, when in command, was victorious on a number of occasions. The Member of Parliament for Shrewsbury, he was raised to the peerage in May 1814. Wellington was appointed Knight of the Garter on 14th March 1813 and, on 3rd May 1814, a Dukedom was conferred upon him. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.726. £800-1200
303.    DUKE OF WELLINGTON AND LORD HILL
A blue and white transferware jug, c.1814, the oval body printed with named equestrian portraits flanking a drum and other military trophies, the rim with a wide floral band, a small filled rim chip, 15cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 176, 177 and 178. £150-250
304.    GEORGE III AND DUKE OF WELLINGTON
A creamware jug, c.1814, printed in black and decorated in bright enamels, one side with an oval portrait titled 'George the Third in the 51st Year of his Reign', the reverse with a similar portrait of the Iron Duke within flags and other military trophies, beneath the spout painted with the name 'Mary Hockin', a small chip beneath the foot, 20cm.

Whilst the 51st year of George III's reign commenced on 26th October 1810, Dukedom was conferred upon Wellington on 3rd May 1814. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 606 and 623 for the Wellington print but captioned 'Lord Viscount'.
£600-800
305.    GEORGE III AND DUKE OF WELLINGTON
A large documentary creamware jug, c.1814, printed in black with named portraits among laurel branches and other trophies, beneath the spout inscribed 'I;E. Tutcher, Lamb Inn: Topsham' within a wheat ear cartouche including a broadsheet entitled 'The Fun' and drinking implements, minor faults, 28.2cm.

The impressive size of this jug might help account for the fact that by 1816 John Tutcher, a victualler from Topsham in the county of Devon is recorded as a prisoner for debt, incarcerated in his Majesty's jail of Saint Thomas the Apostle. See footnote to lot 304 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls 606 and 623 for the Wellington print but captioned 'Lord Viscount'.
£600-800
306.    1815 JACK SHAW AND THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO
A rare and large creamware mug, c.1815, printed in black with an equestrian battle scene titled 'Shaw the Life Guards Man's Heroic Attack on the French Cuirassiers', restored, 13.6cm.

Corporal of the Horse, Jack Shaw, was physically a well-developed young man who achieved great notoriety as an accomplished pugilist and, had it not been for Napoleon, would have had a chance at becoming Pugilist Champion of All England. He saw action in the Peninsular campaign following which, in Paris, whilst involved in the preparations for the Congress of Vienna, he honed his fencing skills, which were to serve him well at Waterloo. Injured at Genappe (but not seriously) on 17th June, Shaw was part of the 2nd Life Guards charge at the French 1st Regiment of Cuirassiers the following day. When challenged by a Frenchman to single combat Shaw despatched him with ease, as he did the further eight Cuirassiers that followed. Flushed with their success in disrupting French commander d'Erlon's attack, but against orders, both brigades of the Heavy Cavalry pressed home their charge. An exhausted Shaw becoming cut off from his troop continued in his slaughter of the French first with sword, then with what remained of its hilt and finally swinging his helmet as a weapon until a pistol shot felled him from his horse. Laid to rest at La Haye Sainte after the battle, Shaw's body was disinterred several years later for re-burial in England. Such was his notoriety that Sir Walter Scott became obsessed with his heroics and the artist Sir John Everett Millais painted a version of the opening round of Shaw's victorious single combat. His name is recorded upon the Waterloo Memorial at Cossall near Nottingham and the historian and politician, Lord Macauley wrote 'Shaw did more to win the battle of Waterloo than did Wellington himself'.
£400-600
307.    WELLINGTON AND BLUCHER
A stoneware jug, c.1815, sprigged with named half-length portraits in white on a blue glazed ground, beneath the spout with twining cornucopia and clasped hands inscribed ''Peace & Plenty' in black, restoration to the spout, 13.5cm. £120-180
308.    COMMANDERS AND MONARCHS OF NAPOLEON'S ENEMIES
A pearlware jug, c.1815, printed in black and enamelled in colours with a spray of flowers of the Union incorporating eight hidden heads in profile, the sides with small baskets of flowers, the underside inscribed in black with the names of those depicted, restored, 13.5cm.
£400-600
309.    1815 WATERLOO
A pearlware jug, dated 1815, printed in black and painted in colours with two figures inscribed 'John and Mary Woodhead', the reverse with an equestrian study captioned 'The Prince of Watterloo [sic], His Grace the Duke of Wellington', beneath the spout with a floral cartouche inscribed 'Josh Haigk Watterloo Man. 16th, 17, 18 Jnue [sic] 1815', some restoration, 14cm.

Private Joshua Haigh is recorded at Waterloo in the 51st Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry) under Captain Peter Smellie. He may have also been with the regiment during previous campaigning in the Iberian Peninsula and elsewhere but he did not claim the medal for this when it was issued in 1848, suggesting that he had probably died during the intervening years.
£250-350
310.    1815 WATERLOO
A large creamware jug, c.1815, printed in black with a cartoon depicting a caged Napoleon being captured by two sailors in a boat, with associated speech bubbles, the reverse with a country couple offering their tenth child to the parson, titled 'The Tythe Pig', restored, 19.6cm.

This is probably the last depiction of Napoleon following his defeat at Waterloo. The reference to Meg of Wapping in the speech bubble of the sailor at the helm may refer to one Magderlina de Coursey, a French noblewoman of beauty who fled France and settled in Wapping High Street where she appears to have taken no fewer than seven husbands. Exposed as a bigamist, she was deported and lived out her life in the Balearics. The Naval association with Wapping, where press gangs operated, is well documented. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.729.
£400-600
311.    1815 WATERLOO
A Shorthose blue and white transferware saucer, c.1815, printed with a view of soldiers before the 'Wellington Hotel, Waterloo', printed mark, 12cm.
£70-90
312.    1815 WATERLOO
A blue and white transferware saucer, c.1815, printed with soldiers before the building at Hougoumont, bearing a large sign indistinctly named 'Waterloo', the border with named and dated portrait medallions of Wellington and Blücher, the underside impressed with an anchor and F 4 B, a small rim chip, 13.7cm. £60-90
313.    1815 WATERLOO
A Scottish pearlware bowl, c.1815, the exterior inscribed 'Waterloo' above a Highlanders cap, the reverse painted with a sword, reserved on a sponged ochre ground with green splashes, a large section broken out and restuck, 16.3cm. £100-150
314.    1815 WATERLOO
A rare creamware plate, c.1815, brightly painted with a cannon and flags inscribed 'Waterloo', within a bold floral and foliate border, two faint cracks to the underside, 24.6cm.
£700-1000
315.    1815 PRINCESS CHARLOTTE, WELLINGTON AND BLÜCHER
A rare rectangular pearlware plaque, c.1815, finely moulded with half-length portraits of the princess flanked by the military men, between starburst motifs, all painted in coloured enamels, the reverse indistinctly incised with the names of the sitters, pierced with two glazed suspension holes, 21.7cm.

Exhibited: 'Jubilation', Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood, May to September 1977, number 39.
£1000-2000
316.    GEORGE III
A Flight Barr and Barr (Worcester) twin-handled cabinet cup and saucer, c.1815, the cup painted by Thomas Baxter with a profile portrait of the king in military uniform within an oval border of colourful jewelling, reserved on a deep blue ground with formal gilt design, script mark to the cup, printed to the saucer, the cup restored, 13.5cm. (2)

This series of cabinet cups and saucers decorated by Baxter is well documented, with celebrated sitters being drawn from a wide background. Cf. Bonhams, 2nd June 2004, lot 342 for a similar example.
£800-1200
317.    PRINCE REGENT
A Choisy creamware plate, c.1815, printed in black with a portrait titled 'Prince de Galles, Regent d'Angleterre' and inscribed with his date of birth, the rim with small printed motifs, impressed mark, 21.6cm.

This is part of a series of plates, each with a likeness of a European or Russian monarch inscribed with their dates of birth.
£150-200
318.    FEBRUARY 1816: BETROTHAL OF PRINCESS CHARLOTTE TO PRINCE LEOPOLD
A rare creamware mug, c.1816, the narrow cylindrical form boldly printed in brown with caricatures of the couple dancing, he holding a banner inscribed 'A price of 30,000£ Huzza', flanked by a clown and a musician, the rim with wide formal borders, 11.3cm.

With the country's finances in tatters following the Napoleonic Wars, there was disquiet when it emerged that the Princess was entitled to a Civil List allowance of £30,000 per annum. Even worse, while Parliament said that this amount might be saved following her wedding, it failed to admit that it had been agreed that an amount of £60,000 would be contributed to the royal privy purse to cover the costs of her soon to be enlarged household. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.43. £1500-2000
319.    1816 WEDDING OF PRINCESS CHARLOTTE AND PRINCE LEOPOLD
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1816, the lobed body applied with named portraits of the Royal couple, painted in colours, the foot with a band of stiff leaves, the rim with foliate swags in pink lustre and green, restored, 15cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.39 and Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.84. £120-180
320.    1816 WEDDING OF PRINCESS CHARLOTTE AND PRINCE LEOPOLD
A pair of oval pearlware plaques, c.1816, moulded in high relief, each with a portrait of the Royal couple within a green painted formal leaf border and elaborate moulded frame, a restored chip to the front and a chip to the back of the Leopold plaque, 18.8cm high. (2)
£600-800
321.    1816 PRINCESS CHARLOTTE AND PRINCE LEOPOLD AT CLAREMONT
A pearlware lustre teabowl and saucer, c.1816, printed in black with a scene of the couple addressing a lady seated before a cottage, and an early 19th century blue and white transferware plate with a scene of the mansion, titled 'British Views' to the reverse, 25cm max. (3)

Thomas Green in 'Memoirs of Princess Charlotte', published in 1818 by Nuttall, Fisher & Dixon, records that whilst walking in the grounds of Claremont House the couple would often visit Goody Bewley who resided in one of the estate cottages. £70-90
322.    1817 PRINCESS CHARLOTTE IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware vase, c.1817, the flared form printed in black with an inscribed and dated portrait of the princess, the reverse with a named military portrait of the Duke of Wellington, restoration to the rim, 13cm.
£60-90
323.    27TH MARCH 1817 WILLIAM COBBETT
A rare Chamberlain's Worcester mug, c.1817, printed in black with a named portrait after the engraving by Edward Smith, flanked by gilt foliate branches reserved on a pale orange ground, 8.5cm.

Born of farming stock in 1763, Cobbett was first a soldier and then, from 1802, as editor of the Political Register, a radical. Imprisoned for two years for treasonous libel in 1810 he was, on his release, accorded a dinner in London by Sir Francis Burdett at which there were 600 guests. By 1816 the Political Register was mainly read by the working classes and had a circulation of 40,000. On 27th March 1817, fearing arrest for sedition, Cobbett boarded the ship Importer, which was bound for the United States. An engraving published on 11th April 1817 by Edward Smith of Liverpool states that it was after a drawing taken on board the ship. He returned to Britain in 1819 and, after various election defeats, was eventually elected for Oldham in 1831, which he represented until his death in June 1835. The Political Register ceased publication in 1836.

Provenance: ex Shnayerson Collection, sold 12th September 1999, lot 525C.
£700-900
324.    1818 MARRIAGE OF EDWARD AUGUSTUS, DUKE OF KENT AND PRINCESS VICTORIA
A Coalport dish of lozenge shape, c.1818, gilded and enamelled with the Collar and Great George of the Order of the Garter centred by an E monogram, the border with panels of pink roses and blue cornflowers on a yellow ground in the Church Gresham manner, restored, 28cm.

Edward Augustus, fourth son of George III, was born on 2nd November 1767, was created Duke of Kent and Strathearn on 23rd April 1799 and married at Coburg on 29th May, and Kew on 11th July 1818, Princess Victoria Mary Louise, widow of Emich Charles reigning Prince of Leiningen. Their daughter, Alexandrina Victoria, ascended the throne as Queen Victoria on 20th June 1837. A Church Gresham pattern service by Coalport was presented to the Duke of Kent and his wife by the City of London on the occasion of their marriage. Much of the service remains on display at Windsor Castle.
£300-500
325.    PRINCE REGENT
A Nantgarw cabinet cup and saucer, c.1818-20, the large cup painted with a head and shoulders portrait of the future George IV after Sir Thomas Lawrence, depicted in a blue jacket pinned with the Garter Star, reserved on a pale blue ground with elaborate gilt foliate scrolls, the saucer with three panels of pink roses, 14.6cm. (2)

Paper label for the Harry Sherman Nantgarw Porcelain Collection to the saucer.
£700-1000
326.    PRINCE REGENT
An Apsley Pellatt sulphide portrait, c.1819, depicted head and shoulders in profile, wearing the collar, Great George and robes of the Garter, the circular clear glass plaque with gilt metal mount and suspension ring, 10.5cm overall.

Apsley Pellatt took out his first patent for 'sulphides' or cameo encrustations in 1819. This portrait of George probably dates from the latter part of his Regency. Cf. Paul Jokelson, Sulphides, The Art of Cameo Incrustation, figure 9 left.
£300-500
327.    PRINCE REGENT
A pearlware nursery plate, c.1810-20, moulded with a floral and foliate border, the well printed in black and decorated in colours with a velocipede scene captioned 'A Visit from Richmond to Carlton House', a short, faint rim crack, 17.3cm.

The figures depicted upon the dandy-horse are the Prince Regent and Maria Fitzherbert, whom George had married in 1785 without the consent of his father, thus rendering the union invalid under the Royal Marriage Act of 1772. Carlton House was the town residence of the Prince of Wales from 1783. It was demolished in 1826.
£300-400
328.    PRINCE REGENT
A small pearlware bowl, c.1819, printed in black with the inscription 'May the next Royal George save the People' to the interior, the exterior with Chinese pagoda landscapes, raised on a low circular foot, restored, 13.3cm dia. £150-200
329.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A small Sunderland lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black with a portrait of Henry Hunt, titled 'Hunt and Liberty', the reverse with an inscribed plan of central Manchester, a short rim crack and small rim chip, 10.4cm.

The engraving used for this portrait of Hunt is actually that of Commodore William Bainbridge of the United States Navy, previously used in connection with his success in the War of 1812. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.201 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.734 and 741. £400-600
330.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A small Sunderland lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black with a portrait of Henry Hunt, titled 'Hunt and Liberty, the reverse a statement denouncing 'Butchering Cavalry', the rim painted with a stylized floral border beneath a pink lustre band, a chip to the foot, 11.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.736.
£250-350
331.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A rare copper lustre jug, c.1819, the blue body printed in black with a scene titled 'The Manchester Massacre', the reverse with trophies and scrolls, inscribed 'No Corn Bill' and 'Universal Suffrage', the rim with a wide copper lustre band, the spout restored, 12.3cm.

Provenance: with John May, June 1993.
£200-300
332.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A rare copper lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black on a blue ground with named oval portraits of Henry Hunt and Thomas Wooler beside Britannia grieving at a tablet inscribed to the memory of the 'Unfortunate Sufferers at Manchester', the reverse with a portrait and four lines of verse loyal to Henry Hunt, the rim with a wide band of copper lustre, restoration to the spout, 12.6cm.

See footnote to lot 342. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.202 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.742.

£250-350
333.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A yellow ground jug, c.1819, printed in red with a portrait titled 'Henry Hunt Esq' above the inscription 'None of your Butchering Magistrates', the reverse with trophies and inscribed with the aspirations of the masses, the rim with a painted stylized floral border and lustre bands, 13cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.201 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.740. See footnote to lot 329.
£250-350
334.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A rare pearlware lustre jug, c.1819, printed in red with a portrait titled 'Hunt and Liberty', the reverse with a street scene depicting the massacre titled 'Murder' above four lines of verse, the neck painted with a band of strawberries in enamel and pink lustre, restoration to the base, 13.2cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p137 (a) for a description of the print on the reverse. See footnote to lot 329.
£300-400
335.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A small pearlware beaker, c.1819, printed in black with a cavalryman mowing down a woman waving a flag inscribed 'Liberty or Death', titled 'Murder'd on the plains of Peterloo', the reverse with a stylized flower spray, pink lustre band to the rim, restored, 5.8cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.733.
£200-300
336.    16TH AUGUST 1819: PETERLOO MASSACRE
A small pearlware beaker, c.1819, printed in red with a portrait titled 'Hunt, the Reformer's Champion', beneath 'But no Butchering Magistrates', the reverse with an inscription denouncing the cavalrymen, with pink lustre rim, 6.6cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.736 but with alternative lettering. See footnote to lot 329.

£250-350
337.    HENRY HUNT
A small pearlware lustre beaker, c.1819, printed in black with a portrait titled 'Hunt and Liberty', the reverse painted with a stylized flower spray in red and green, the rim with a pink lustre band, 6.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.736 but with alternative lettering. See footnote to lot 329.
£250-350
338.    HENRY HUNT
A rare pearlware small mug or coffee can, c.1819, printed in black with a named profile portrait titled 'The Persevering Advocate of the People's Rights', with pink lustre borders, a small rim chip, 6.4cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.199 and David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.731.

£400-600
339.    HENRY HUNT
A pearlware lustre mug, c.1819, printed in brown with four lines of verse above the inscription 'Hunt and Liberty', the rim with a pink lustre band, 9.1cm.

£250-350
340.    HENRY HUNT
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1819, printed in iron red with an unusual named portrait of Hunt before a building flying a flag titled 'Universal Suffrage', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse, the rim with a mottled purple lustre band, rim crack, chips to the footrim, 12.5cm.
£250-350
341.    HENRY HUNT
A small Sunderland lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black with an unusual portrait of Hunt before a Phyrigian cap and flag inscribed 'Universal Suffrage', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse, the rim with a mottled pink lustre border, 12.8cm.

Provenance: ex Shnayerson collection, sold 13th June 1999, lot 526B.

£300-400
342.    T J WOOLER: EDITOR OF THE BLACK DWARF
A good and rare pearlware copper lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black on a pale blue ground, both sides with a portrait, titled on one side 'Mr T J Wooler, Editor of the Black Dwarf', the rim and foot with a wide copper lustre band, 16.5cm.

Thomas Jonathan Wooler published the satirical radical pamphlet 'The Black Dwarf', commencing on 29th January 1817, in response to the Gagging Act enacted at that time. Within three months he was arrested and charged with seditious libel but found not guilty. By 1819, with roughly 12,000 copies per publication, it far exceeded the circulation from Westminster to the Northern Colliery districts, of the upper middle class Blackwood's Magazine, causing Lord Castlereagh as Leader of the House of Commons to note that it could be found 'in the hatcrowns of almost every pitman you meet'.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, February 2008.

£1000-1500
343.    RESENTMENT TOWARDS MAGISTRATES
A rare Sunderland lustre jug, c.1819, printed in black and well decorated in colours with the scene of a butcher's stall, the reverse with an enclosed cart carrying nine figures with associated speech bubbles and attendant crowd, titled 'Retaliation Or Law Justly Administered On Nine Unjust Magistrates', all reserved on a mottled pink lustre ground, some restoration to the spout, a star crack to the base, 17.5cm.

The order given by William Hulton, Chairman of the Magistrates, to arrest Henry 'Orator' Hunt and others at St Peter's Field, Manchester on 16th August 1819, together with a request for Manchester and Salford Yeomanry to intercede, is well documented. It led to one of the bloodiest days in the struggle for rights, freedom and liberty with 18 fatalities and 420 injured; in consequence of which the Magistrates were blamed for their butchering tactics by an outraged public.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, October 2010.
£1200-1500
344.    ROBERT GIFFORD
An octagonal pearlware nursery soup plate, c.1820-25, printed in blue with a standing bewigged figure with documents emerging from his bag, inscribed with three lines of verse, the rim moulded with florets, a rim crack and chip to the underside, 19.8cm.

A drawing by George Cruikshank was the title page of William Hone's parody 'The House That Jack Built', published December 1819. With the vogue for illustrated verse satires and the fear of militarism following Wellington's inclusion in the Cabinet in 1818, reference is made to Gifford (who was Attorney General) referred to as the 'Public Informer'. Edgell Rickwood, Radical Squibs and Loyal Ripostes, pp. 42 and 311.

£300-400
345.    REFORM
A small creamware lustre beaker, c.1820-25, printed in iron red with four lines of verse in recognition of the oppressed, the reverse with figures before a village church in a landscape, a pink lustre band to the rim, 6.5cm.

£100-150
346.    GEORGE III
An English porcelain saucer, c.1815-20, printed in black with the Monarch looking through a spyglass, star cracks to the base, 13.9cm diameter.

This print is a cut down version of Gillray's earlier satire depicting George III observing, through a spyglass, the miniature figure of Napoleon standing on the Monarch's right hand, titled 'The King of Brobdingnag and Gulliver', published by Hannah Humphrey on 26th June 1803. See David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls.560 and 561.

£120-180
347.    GEORGE III
Two blue and white transferware soup plates, c.1820, the first with an inscribed central medallion depicting King George presenting a Bible to a child, within a border of rose, thistle and shamrock, the other a Davenport soup plate with a classical head in profile within a border of agricultural trophies, Union flowers and cornucopia, impressed factory mark to the latter, 25cm. (2)

George was patron of the Lancasterian Schools catering for the children of the poor and also an ardent agriculturist during his periods of insanity. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 50 and 51 for similar versions of these two plates.
£80-120
348.    1820 GEORGE III IN MEMORIAM
A pair of blue and white transferware plates, c.1820, each printed with a central profile portrait, one of George III, the other of Queen Caroline, within wide floral borders of rose, thistle and shamrock, the Caroline plate chipped and restored, 25.9cm. (2)

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pls 65 and 66.
£100-150
349.    1820 GEORGE III AND DUKE OF KENT IN MEMORIAM
A rare pearlware vase, c.1820, printed in purple to one side with portrait titled 'His Sacred Majesty King George III', the reverse with a named portrait of the Duke of Kent, small footrim chips, 11.7cm.

The Duke of Kent, fourth son of George III, died on 23rd January 1820 just six days prior to his father. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.745.

Provenance: Richardson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th February 2000, lot 66.


£250-350
350.    1820 GEORGE III IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware vase, c.1820, printed in black with a portrait titled 'His Sacred Majesty, King George III', the reverse with a named portrait of the Duke of Wellington, restoration to the foot, 11.7cm.


£180-220
351.    1820 PROCLAMATION OF GEORGE IV
A small pearlware vase, the flared form printed in black with a titled portrait above the dates of the proclamation, the reverse with a dandy astride a velocipede, 10cm.

The velocipede depicted is a dandy-horse (see lot 327), which was a new invention and popular at the time.

Provenance: Richardson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th February 2000, lot 74.

£400-600
352.    1820 ACCESSION OF GEORGE IV
An English porcelain circular plaque or stand, c.1820, printed in black and decorated in green, yellow, pink and gilt with an inscribed portrait, 12.8cm.

George IV was proclaimed King on 31st January 1820 following the death of George III on 29th January. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.69 left.
£250-350
353.    CHARLES WILLIAMS (1796-1830 ACTIVE)
'State Mysteries, a Vision of Pall Mall', 1st April 1813, a hand-coloured engraving, published by M Jones, 40.2 x 50.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue 12028 and British Museum number 1868,0808.12706.

£150-250
354.    ISAAC ROBERT CRUIKSHANK (1789-1856)
'A Scene in the New Farce of the Lady and the Devil', June 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, published by Benbow, 23.5 x 34.2cm, overmounted and framed.

Caroline arrived in London on 6th June 1820. Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.163; British Museum Satires Catalogue 13728. £250-350
355.    ISAAC ROBERT CRUIKSHANK (1789-1856)
'Public Opinion', June 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, published by William Benbow, 24 x 34cm, overmounted and framed.

George and his worthy supporters were no match for the public's support of Caroline in the early stage of proceedings. Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.168 and British Museum number 1975,0118.27.

£200-300
356.    S W FORES (PUBLISHER)
'The Royal Green bag or another Ministerial Scare Crow', 10th June 1820, a hand-coloured engraving on laid paper, 33.5 x 22.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum number 1985,0119.101.
£200-300
357.    GEORGE CRUIKSHANK (1792-1878)
'Ah! Sure Such a pair was never Seen so justly formed to meet by nature', a hand-coloured engraving, published by McCleary, 21.7 x 32cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.166; British Museum Satires Catalogue 13735 and British Museum number 1859,0316.160.

£150-200
358.    ATTRIBUTED TO ISAAC ROBERT CRUIKSHANK (1789-1856)
'Opening the Green Bag or the Friends of Hell let loose', 8th July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, published by S W Fores, 22.5 x 31.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.167 and British Museum number 1985,0119.98.
£150-200
359.    WILLIAM HEATH (1794-1840)
'The Pageantry put off or the Raree Show adjourned', 13th July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving on laid paper, published by S W Fores, 23.2 x 33cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13759 and British Museum number 1948,0214.836 .

£200-300
360.    CHARLES WILLIAMS (1796-1830 ACTIVE)
'The Milan Garland or Revels around the Vice Post', July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, published by John Johnston, 24.1 x 34.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13760 and British Museum number 1935,0522.11.140.
£80-120
361.    JOHN FAIRBURN (PUBLISHER)
'All A Bottle of Smoke!! or John Bull and the Secret Committee', July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, 25 x 37cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13761 and National Portrait Gallery number D46058.

£200-300
362.    WILLIAM HEATH (1794-1840)
'Falstaff and his Ragged Crew or The Contents of the Green Bag in Propria Persona', 20th July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, published by S W Fores, 22 x 31.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13766 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.116
£150-250
363.    WILLIAM HEATH (1794-1840)
'The Measure of Happiness or a Royal visit to the Dey of Tunis or the Great Plempo', 20th July 1820, a hand-coloured engraving on laid paper, published by S W Fores, 22.7 x 31.8cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13767.
£150-250
364.    JOHN FAIRBURN (PUBLISHER)
'The Cauldron or Shakespeare Travestie 1820', a hand-coloured engraving, 22.5 x 32.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue, number 13787 and British Museum number 1948,0214.817.

£200-300
365.    J LEWIS MARKS (c.1796-1855)
'King Henry VIII, Act II Scene IV'', a hand-coloured engraving, 23.8 x 33.2cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.170; British Museum Satires Catalogue number 13829 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.139.
£100-200
366.    JOHN FAIRBURN (PUBLISHER)
'Boadicea, Queen of Britain, overthrowing Her Enemies', November 1820, a hand-coloured engraving, 24 x 34.2cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, p.176; British Museum Satires Catalogue number 12 in the appendix and British Museum number 1983,0305.38.
£200-300
367.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'Bergamis Little Darling', 25th January 1821, a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 25.5 x 18.5cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14112 (although differently titled, referred to in the description) and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.165.
£100-150
368.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'Grand Entrance To Bamboozl'Em', February 1821, a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 28.5 x 41.2cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. Kenneth Baker, George IV: A Life in Caricature, pp. 164 and 165; British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14122 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.183.
£250-350
369.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'The Man of the Woods & Cat-o-mountain', a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 30.5 x 21.5Cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14131.

£150-200
370.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'Dido in Despair', 3rd April 1821, hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 28 x 22.7cm, overmounted and framed.

This is a parody of Gillray's satire of 1801 of the same title. Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14144 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.205. £100-150
371.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'The Como-cal Hobby', 20th April 1821, a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 28.4 x 23.4cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14171 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.168.
£150-200
372.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'Lucifer's Procession. Fairy Queen', a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 27 x 41.2cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14182 and British Museum number 1935,0522.12.184.
£300-500
373.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'A parting Hug at St. Omer!', 1st June 1821, a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 25.7 x 20.7cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum number 1975,0118.31.
£100-150
374.    THEODORE LANE (1800-1828)
'The Grand Coronation of Her Most Graceless Majesty C-R-L--E COLUMBINA the first Queen of all the Radicals', 19th July 1821, a hand-coloured engraving, published by George Humphrey, 29.2 x 41.7cm, overmounted and framed.

Cf. British Museum Satires Catalogue number 14205 and British Museum number 1948,0214.827.
£300-500
375.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A rare small blue and white transferware dish, c.1820, with scalloped rim, printed with a view of the Royal party on a boat before the Villa D' Este, titled 'Her Majesty's Residence on the Lake of Como', 10.8cm.

£200-300
376.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A small pearlware lustre beaker, c.1820, printed in black with an inscribed crowned head titled 'Queen Caroline or the Royal Wanderer', the reverse with four lines of verse flanked by barley stalks, the rim with a pink lustre band, restored, 6.2cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.62.
£200-300
377.    1820 QUEEN CAROLINE
A small pearlware lustre jug, c.1820, printed in brown with a portrait titled 'Her Majesty Queen Caroline of England', the reverse with a scene of the queen being escorted from a boat while cheered by onlookers, titled 'Queen Cariline [sic] Landing at Dover', the rim with a wide copper lustre band edged in pink, restoration to the spout and foot, 11.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.61.
£250-350
378.    6TH JUNE 1820: QUEEN CAROLINE AND MATTHEW WOOD
A rare Stevenson pearlware plate, c.1820, printed in blue with an inscribed portrait of Wood detailing his chivalrous gesture towards the queen, the rim moulded with a continuous floral band, impressed mark, 19.7cm.

Alderman Wood had been twice Lord Mayor of London 1815 to 1817 and was MP for the City of Westminster 1817 to 1843.
£350-450
379.    1820 GEORGE IV AND ARRIVAL OF QUEEN CAROLINE
A rare creamware mug, c.1820, the cylindrical body printed in brown and hand-coloured with a cartoon depicting George IV chased by two figures while two more watch with amusement, titled 'The Royal Sneak', three small footrim chips, 13.2cm.

The origin of this cartoon satirising the imminent arrival of Queen Caroline is unknown. In a letter dated 13th August 1997 David Drakard states that not only had he not seen this subject he was unaware of any satire which it may be after.
£1000-1500
380.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A small rectangular pearlware plaque, c.1820, moulded in relief with a head and shoulders profile portrait wearing a ruff collar and plumed hat, surmounted by a crown and the initials 'QC', decorated with a pink and purple lustre frame, two small chips, 14.1cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.54.
£300-400
381.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A Stevenson pearlware nursery plate, c.1820, printed in brown and decorated in blue and yellow with an inscribed portrait, the rim moulded with a continuous floral border, impressed mark, 15.3cm.

Provenance: Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, sold Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 597.
£250-350
382.    QUEEN CAROLINE AND THE LATE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
A pearlware vase, c.1820, printed in brown to one side with a portrait titled 'Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Caroline', the reverse with another titled 'The Late and Much Lamented Princess Charlotte of Saxe Coburg', restored, 11.7cm.
£250-350
383.    QUEEN CAROLINE AND THE LATE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
A small pearlware lustre mug, c.1820, printed in purple with a named portrait watched over by an angelic Charlotte with a banner inscribed 'Protect my mother', the rim with a wide copper and pink lustre band, restoration to the foot, 7.6cm high.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.59.
£200-300
384.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A small pearlware lustre jug, c.1820, printed in red with a portrait titled 'Her Majesty Queen Caroline of England', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse, with pink lustre bands to the neck and rim, 12.5cm.

This likeness of Caroline is the re-named version of Princess Charlotte. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 49 and 53.
£200-300
385.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A small pearlware lustre jug, c.1820, printed in brown to one side with a portrait titled 'Her Majesty Caroline, Virtue Triumphant', the reverse with an oval cartouche inscribed 'May the diamonds in the British crown glitter on the head of our noble Queen Caroline', with pink lustre bands, 12.2cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.56.

Provenance: with John May, September 1992.
£200-300
386.    1820 QUEEN CAROLINE
An unusual English porcelain jug in the manner of Sunderland lustre, dated 1820, printed in brown with a portrait titled 'Long Live Queen Caroline', painted in blue, green and pink lustre with flowers and foliage, the reverse with the first verse of Isaac Watts' hymn after the 90th Psalm, beneath the spout inscribed 'Elizabeth Smith, Thurvaston 1820', 13.2cm.

Thurvaston is a village in Derbyshire. There are several Elizabeth Smiths listed on the 1841 census; the most likely living 10 miles from Thurvaston in St Werburgh and recorded as being of independent means.

£250-350
387.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in black to two sides with a portrait titled 'Long Live Queen Caroline', the inscription echoed to the underside, beneath the spout with a cartouche of seven lines of loyal verse, restoration to the spout and rim, 14.5cm. £200-300
388.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A pearlware jug, printed in black with a portrait titled 'Her Majesty Queen Caroline of England', the reverse with a cartouche containing four lines of loyal verse, with pink lustre bands to the rim, a short crack to the base, 14.5cm.

This likeness of Caroline is the re-named version of Princess Charlotte. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls.49 and 53. £200-300
389.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A copper lustre banded pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in puce with a portrait of the queen inscribed 'God save Queen Caroline!', the reverse with a cartouche containing four lines of loyal verse, the rim with a wide copper lustre band edged in pink, 15cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 748 and 750. £250-350
390.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A Staffordshire pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in black to one side with a portrait titled 'Long Live Queen Caroline', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse within a floral and foliate cartouche reserved on a yellow ground with lustre decoration to the rim, signed in the print 'R Johnson, Hanley, Staffordshire', restoration, 16cm.
£250-350
391.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A Pratt ware jug, c.1820, moulded and decorated in colours with profile portrait medallions flanked by flower sprays, the rim moulded with 'Queen Caroline', the spout moulded with a satyr mask, the underside impressed 'Warranted Winchester Measure', a large restored crack, 15.6cm. £200-300
392.    QUEEN CAROLINE
A creamware jug, c.1820, printed in black with a portrait bust upon a plinth inscribed 'Queen of Great Britain Shielded by Britannia and Wisdom', flanked by Britannia and Athena, the reverse with Britannia seated and supporting a shield with the Royal coat of arms, restoration to the foot and rim, 18cm.
£250-350
393.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A small pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in black and hand-coloured with a satire after Isaac Robert Cruikshank depicting the scales of justice, the reverse with a cartouche inscribed with ten lines of verse entitled 'Truth and Liberty', some rim faults, 11.8cm.

The cartoon on this jug is after the satire titled 'Public Opinion', which was published by T Benbow on 20th June 1820. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 752 and 753. £250-350
394.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A small pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in black and hand-coloured with a satire after Isaac Robert Cruikshank depicting the scales of justice, the reverse inscribed with a verse from 'The Green Bag' rhyme within a foliate and ribboned cartouche detailing her supporters, some restoration to the spout and rim, 12.1cm.

See footnote to lot 392. £250-350
395.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A copper and pink lustre pearlware jug, c.1820, printed in black with a portrait of the queen above the inscription 'God Save Queen Caroline', the reverse inscribed with a verse form 'The Green Bag' rhyme within a foliate and ribboned cartouche detailing her supporters, the rim and shoulders with a wide copper lustre band edged in pink, the spout restored, 14.5cm.

Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 747, 748 and 749. £200-300
396.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1820, printed in brown with a titled portrait of Queen Caroline, the reverse with six lines of prose commencing 'Try me good King', the rim with a copper and pink lustre band, restored, 13.9cm

The text on the reverse is taken from Anne Boleyn's letter to Henry VIII of 6th May 1536.
£150-250
397.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A blue and white transferware jug, c.1820, printed to one side with a profile portrait of Queen Caroline, the reverse with a quotation from Shakespeare's King Henry VIII, Act III, Sc. I, the rim with Union flowers, 14.5cm.
£300-400
398.    1820 ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A blue and white transferware jug, c.1820, printed with a named portrait of Queen Caroline within rose and thistle sprays, the reverse with a portrait titled 'H. Brougham Esq MP', some restoration to the spout and rim, 12.8cm.
£200-300
399.    BROUGHAM, DENMAN AND THE ROYAL DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS
A pearlware jug, c.1820, moulded and painted with oval portraits, titled around the neck 'H Brougham Esq MP' and 'T Denman Esq MP', the spout moulded as a satyr mask, restoration to the spout and rim, 13.2cm.

Henry Brougham and Thomas Denman represented the Caroline interest during the Bill of Pains and Penalties. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 216 and 217; and John and Griselda Lewis, Pratt Ware, p.137. £250-350
400.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A good and rare creamware mug, c.1821, the squat cylindrical body printed in black with a portrait inscribed 'Crowned July 19th 1821 George the fourth Born Aug't 12 1762, Succeeded to the Throne Jan'y 29th 1819' and 'God Save the King', 7.7cm.

The date recorded for George's succession on these mugs in incorrectly stated as 1819. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.67. £800-1200
401.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare creamware mug, dated 1821, the cylindrical body painted in brown and red with a crowned monogram above the date July 19 1821, good restoration to the foot, 8.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.69. £700-1000
402.    GEORGE IV
A large pearlware lustre porter mug, c.1821, probably Scottish, moulded and brightly enamelled with a named likeness flanked by flowers, reserved on a pink lustre ground, some restoration, 13.5cm.

Similar likenesses can be found on Scottish pottery plaques inscribed 'Welcome George IV', which were made in celebration of the Monarch's arrival in Edinburgh on 14th August 1822. See lots 421 and 422. This mug, impressed as it is George IIII, was possibly made to commemorate his Coronation of 1821.
£1200-1500
403.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
An English porcelain jug, moulded and painted with monogrammed profile portraits of George IV flanked by rose and thistle sprays, a chip and short crack to the spout, 10.7cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.80.
£150-250
404.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A small creamware jug, c.1821, printed in brown to two sides with a portrait of the king in his Coronation robes, titled 'George Rex IV', between narrow pink lustre bands, 12.5cm. £300-400
405.    GEORGE IV AND QUEEN CAROLINE
A pearlware jug, c.1821, moulded and brightly enamelled with named profile portraits flanked by flowers and foliage, beneath the spout with a crowned harp, the neck with crowns and further flowers, restored, 12.8cm.

Likenesses of both George and Caroline appearing on the same ceramic piece are extremely rare.
£250-350
406.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A Staffordshire stone china jug, c.1821, printed in blue and decorated in coloured enamels with crowns and flowers of the Union, beneath the spout with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'George IV crowned July 10 1821', signed in the print 'R Johnnson, Hanley', some restoration, 13.6cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.66.
£150-250
407.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare pearlware lustre jug, c.1821, printed in black and decorated in colours with a crown and flowers of the Union, the reverse with a small portrait of George IV above four lines of verse loyal to Queen Caroline, the rim with a wide copper lustre band edged in pink, a body crack, 14cm.

Provenance: Richardson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th February 2000, lot 78.
£300-400
408.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare pearlware jug, c.1821, printed in black to two sides a with a portrait of the king titled 'His most Gracious Majesty George IV' above the date of his Coronation, the neck painted in colours with flowers, restored, 14cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.81. £400-600
409.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
An English porcelain jug, c.1821, beneath the spout painted with a roundel containing a crown, sprays of rose, thistle and shamrock and a gilt inscription giving George IV's key dates, flanked by bold sprays of flowers, the neck with further sprays of rose, shamrock and thistle, a small footrim chip, 15.5cm.
£1200-1500
410.    GEORGE IV
A large Coalport jug, c.1821, applied beneath the spout with a white biscuit porcelain medallion moulded with a Classical head of the King in profile and inscribed in Latin, within a gilt border, reserved on a deep cobalt blue ground, the neck moulded with a continuous band of fruiting vine highlighted in gilt, 24.5cm.

Similarly decorated lilac ground mugs with the underside dated in Roman numerals 'July 19th 1829' exist, see lot 443 and John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.76. This undated jug probably dates from George's early reign.
£300-400
411.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare pearlware vase, c.1821, the flared form printed in black with an equestrian portrait inscribed 'The Champion of England at the Coronation of George IV', the reverse with a portrait of George III, rim faults, 13cm.

Originating in feudal law in the 14th century, the challenge of the King's Champion was last exercised at the banquet immediately following the lavish coronation service of George IV on 19th July 1821. On that occasion Henry Dymore performed the role as Protector of the Monarch. Dressed in full armour astride a piebald charger he entered Westminster Hall and, on throwing down a gauntlet, demanded of the assembled company if anyone might challenge the sovereign right of George IV.

£700-900
412.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare pair of small Herculaneum circular plaques, c.1821, each finely printed in purple, one with a scene of the crown being placed on George's head, the other with a crown above the inscription 'God Save the King GR IV Crowned 19th July 1821', within moulded and painted oak leaf and acorn borders, pierced for suspension, impressed marks, 7.6cm (2).

Parted for many years, these two plaques were eventually reunited in the Herbert Ward collection, sold at Bonhams on 8th September 1990, lot 752; subsequently the Peter King collection, sold at Bonhams, 1st June 1994, lot 311; and the Richardson collection, sold at Bonhams, 9th February 2000, Lot 75. No other examples are believed to be recorded.

£2000-3000
413.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rare small pearlware nursery plate, c.1821, the centre moulded with a named head and shoulders portrait of Denman, overprinted in blue with an inscribed equestrian portrait titled 'The Hon. the King's Champion, Henry Dymore Esq', with floral moulded border picked out in orange and green, 13.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.71 for a version of this print but over a portrait of Caroline.

Provenance: Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, sold Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 634.
£250-350
414.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A Leeds creamware plate (Hartley Green & Co), c.1821, printed in black with a crown and flowers of the Union entwined with a ribbon inscribed 'George IV Crown'd July 19th 1821', impressed mark, 19cm.

By repute, these plates were made for the Coronation dinner held for children at Leeds Parish Church School. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.65 and p.45 (3). £250-350
415.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A fine and rare pearlware nursery plate, c.1821, moulded and painted and with the scene of the Archbishop of Canterbury placing the crown upon George's head, titled to a ribboned band, within a border including a lustred coat of arms, bishops' mitres, Garter stars and flower heads, 192mm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.68.

Provenance: Peter King collection, sold Bonhams, 1st June 1994, lot 272; and Richardson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th February 2000, lot 76.

£1000-1500
416.    1821 CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
A rectangular Portobello pearlware plaque, c.1821, moulded and decorated in typical colours with a head and shoulders portrait of the King, the ribbon beneath impressed 'King George IIII', the integral frame painted black and pierced with two suspension holes, 18.8cm wide.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, May 2009.
£400-600
417.    1821 QUEEN CAROLINE IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware lustre mug, c.1821, the cylindrical form printed in black with ten lines of verse lamenting the queen, flanked by stylized painted floral sprays, the rim and foot with bands of copper and pink lustre, 9.9cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.76. £150-250
418.    1821 QUEEN CAROLINE IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1821, printed in black with a portrait titled 'Queen Caroline Died Aug't 7 1821', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse, within pink lustre bands, minor rim chipping, 14.6cm.

Provenance: with John May, April 1991.
£250-350
419.    1821 QUEEN CAROLINE IN MEMORIAM
A pair of small pearlware nursery plates, c.1821, printed in blue with titled views of the funeral procession and cortege, the floral and foliate moulded borders decorated in orange and green enamel, one broken and restored, 13.9cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, plate 71 for the procession print.
£400-500
420.    1821 QUEEN CAROLINE IN MEMORIAM AND CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
An unusual creamware bowl, c.1821, printed in brown and highlighted in green with a named and dated portrait of George above four lines of loyal verse in memory of Caroline, the reverse with a horse racing scene between stylized flower sprays, with pink lustre rim, restored, 16.3cm diameter.
£200-300
421.    1822 GEORGE IV VISIT TO SCOTLAND
A Portobello pearlware rectangular plaque, c.1822, moulded and decorated in typical palette with a head and shoulders portrait of the King above a ribbon indistinctly impressed 'Welcome George IV', the integral frame pierced for suspension, faintly inscribed W to the underside, 15.6cm. £400-600
422.    1822 GEORGE IV VISIT TO SCOTLAND
A Scottish pearlware plaque, c.1822, moulded and painted with a head and shoulders portrait of the King above a ribbon impressed 'Welcome George IV', painted below with the title 'Georgius IV Britannia', with rose and thistle sprays either side of his head, the moulded frame decorated with pink lustre, 16.5cm.
£400-600
423.    1822 GEORGE IV VISIT TO SCOTLAND
A Portobello pearlware jug, c.1822, sprigged and painted with a scene of a kneeling woman holding a crown to the King, titled 'Genius of Scotland Presenting the Crown to George the IV', the reverse with a Garter badge variant design centred by St Andrew holding the saltire, surmounted by a crown and flanked by thistle sprays, with pink lustre decoration, restoration to the spout and rim, 16.8cm.
£400-600
424.    WILLIAM PITT THE YOUNGER
An English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, possibly Spode, painted with a portrait after the engraving by J. Bocquet, the reverse with sprays of auricula and chrysanthemum, between beaded bands, titled 'Pitt' in red to the base and numbered 262, a restored rim section, 13.3cm.

Pitt was Prime Minister from 1783 to 1801 and again between 1804 until his death on 23rd January 1806. £200-300
425.    MARQUESS OF LONDONDERRY
An English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, possibly Spode, painted with a version of Sir Thomas Lawrence's portrait of Robert Stewart reserved in a gilt border on a white ground, the reverse with a spray of rose and tulip, between beaded borders, titled in red and numbered 262 on the underside, 13.5cm.

Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry is best remembered as Lord Castlereagh when Foreign Secretary, a post he held between the turbulent years of 1812 and 1822 when he was also Leader of the House of Commons. He became Marquess after the death of his father in April 1821. Overworked and under constant personal and political pressure both at home and abroad he took his own life on 12th August 1822.
£300-400
426.    GEORGE IV
An English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, possibly Spode, painted with a portrait of George IV within a square gilt border on a white ground, the reverse with stems of rose and poppy, titled 'George the 4th' in red to the underside and with shape number 262, a restored rim crack, 15.7cm.

£600-800
427.    DUKE OF YORK
An English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, possibly Spode, painted with a portrait of Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, within a gilt border on a white ground, the reverse with a spray of rose and poppy, titled 'Duke of York' in red to the base and with pattern number 262, 15.4cm.

£400-600
428.    RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN
A small English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, painted with a portrait after an 1808 engraving by Scriven, within a chamfered gilt border on a white ground, with beading to the rim and foot, inscribed 'The Rt Hon. R. B. Sheridan' in black to the underside, restored, 11.7cm.

Richard Sheridan (1751-1816) was an Irish satirist, politician, playwright, and long-standing owner of the Theatre Royal. He was a Whig MP from 1780 to 1812. He is buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey. £250-350
429.    CHARLES JAMES FOX
An English porcelain vase, c.1820-25, the wide flared shape painted with a portrait of Fox within an octagonal gilt border, reserved on a white ground between beaded borders, inscribed 'The Rt. Hon'ble. Charles James Fox' in black to the base, restored, 16.1cm.

Born in 1749, Fox became a Whig MP in 1768. He was best known for his eloquent speeches, chaotic yet colourful lifestyle and spent much of his political life in opposition. He died in 1806.
£400-600
430.    JOHN GEORGE LAMBTON
A tall creamware mug, c.1822, painted in black with the inscription 'Lambton' above 'the terror of the black coats and defender of our rights', within a colourful foliate border, restored, 15cm.

Known as 'Radical Jack', the naturally rebellious Lambton represented Durham for the Whigs from 1812 until he was elevated to the peerage as Earl of Durham in 1828. Immensely wealthy, as a coal mine owner (Black Coat), he refused to evict his tenants to enable open cast mining. £400-600
431.    1826 GENERAL ELECTION IN DURHAM
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1826, moulded and decorated in green enamel and pink and purple lustre with stag hunting scenes, inscribed in black 'Lambton for ever', the spout restored, 13cm.

At the election for Durham County, held on 15th June 1826, John George Lambton, later Earl of Durham, was returned for the Whigs.
£200-300
432.    1826 ALNWICK BY-ELECTION
A pearlware lustre porter mug, c.1826, printed in brown and highlighted in blue and red with a horse racing scene titled 'A heat between the four candidates at Alnwick', between pink lustre bands, restored cracks, 9.8cm.

Following the death of Charles John Brandling, the incumbent, a by-election was held in Alnwick on 21st February 1826. It was a bitterly contested affair at which Matthew Bell was triumphant for the Tories by 36 votes. During the hustings Thomas Wentworth Beaumont called Lord Howick's supporter, John George Lambton, (see lots 430 and 431) a liar. In consequence of which, on the 1st July, Beaumont and Lambton fought what concluded by being a bloodless duel on the beach beneath Bamburgh Castle.

£300-400
433.    1826 GENERAL ELECTION IN ALNWICK
A large pink lustre porter mug, c.1826, printed in brown and highlighted in blue enamel with a portrait of Matthew Bell titled 'Bell and Victory', flanked by berried swags and flags, inscribed below with the names of the candidates and number of votes cast, restored, 12.4cm.

At the general election held on 6th July 1826 the two Tory candidates were triumphant, with Henry Thomas Liddell polling 1,562 votes and Matthew Bell 1,380. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.92 right.

£300-400
434.    1827 DUKE OF YORK IN MEMORIAM
A small English porcelain bowl, c.1827, printed in black with figures grieving at tombs bearing small portraits or inscribed 'In Memory of HRH Frederick, Duke of York KG', with narrow pink lustre bands, a crack to the base, 12.9cm diameter.
£80-120
435.    1827 DUKE OF YORK IN MEMORIAM
A buff ground lustre jug, c.1827, printed in black with two oval cartouches bearing the inscription 'A token of respect for His Royal Highness the Duke of York', beneath the spout with a named and dated head and shoulders portrait of the same, 14cm.

Provenance: Commemorative Wares from a Canadian Collection, sold Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 552.
£250-350
436.    1827 DUKE OF YORK IN MEMORIAM
A documentary pearlware lustre jug, dated 1827, printed in brown and boldly enamelled with three figures outside the Maid's Head public house, the building bearing the slogan 'I Micock Dealer in Wines', beneath the spout with an equestrian portrait detailing the Duke's last visit to Newmarket, painted in black 'James and Martha Higginbottom 1827', the rim with a wide band of pink lustre, a large body crack, 19.2cm.

Frederick, Duke of York was a lover of the turf and reputedly lived for a time in what remained of the Old Palace in Newmarket, now the National Horse Racing Museum. The Maid's Head in Wicken, on the outskirts of Newmarket, still exists. There is a record of James Higginbottom marrying Martha Faulker in Lancashire in 1820. They are listed on the 1851 census in Stockport, James working as a cotton trader while Martha is described as a "bleader of leeches". £400-600
437.    DANIEL O'CONNELL
A pearlware jug, c.1827, printed in black with a titled profile portrait to two sides, beneath the spout inscribed 'Erin Ma Vorneen' (Ireland My Love), some restoration, 14.6cm.

The Catholic Association was founded by O'Connell in 1823 to campaign for Catholic emancipation. Following the 1826 general election, funds that had been collected were used in part to support those who had voted against unsympathetic landlords.
£250-350
438.    1828: DANIEL O'CONNELL MP
A Sunderland lustre jug, c.1828, printed in black to two sides with a profile portrait inscribed ' Daniel O'Connell Esq MP For the County of Clare', the rim with a wide copper lustre band between pink lustre borders, some restoration to the spout, 11.8cm.

Upon his appointment to the Board of Trade, William Vesey Fitzgerald was forced to seek re-election. Exploiting a loophole in the Act of Union of 1800, O'Connell stood against him for the County of Clare in the by-election held at the end of June 1828. Whilst successful, O'Connell was barred from taking his seat in Westminster on the grounds of his Catholic faith. This forced Parliament to consider the Catholic Emancipation bill on 13th April 1829, which passed into the statute books. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.87B right.
£250-350
439.    1828 DANIEL O'CONNELL MP
A creamware jug, c.1828, printed in brown with a profile portrait of O'Connell titled 'The Man of the People', the reverse with four lines of loyal verse, a small rim chip and a star crack beneath the handle, 15cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, p.130. £300-400
440.    1829 YORK MINSTER FIRE AND ARSONIST JONATHAN MARTIN
A large pearlware porter mug, c.1829, printed in blue with a view of York Minster in flames, titled 'York Minster on Fire Feb'y 2nd 1829', the reverse with a named and inscribed profile portrait of Jonathan Martin 'the Incendiary', restored cracks, 12.4cm.

Martin was born in 1782, one of twelve siblings and lived a tragic life. He had a speech impediment, witnessed the murder of his sister by a neighbour and was press ganged in London in 1804. He served six years in the Navy, during which time his religious obsession was noted by shipmates. Returning to County Durham he married and became a Wesleyan preacher in 1814, denouncing the Church of England. He was placed in a lunatic asylum after threatening to shoot the Bishop of Oxford, but managed to escape in June 1820. The following year his first wife died and he escaped a second time from the asylum. Marrying again in 1828, he moved to York. Here he suffered a further breakdown and, whilst attending evensong at the Minster on 1st February 1829, he became so upset by a buzzing sound from the organ that he set fire to the bell tower following the service. In his ensuing trial at York Castle, before Baron Hullock he was defended by Henry Brougham. Declared guilty on the grounds of insanity he was detained at Bethlem Royal Hospital in South London, where he died on 3rd June 1838 - three months prior to his son committing suicide. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, plate 13.
£300-400
441.    1829 MATTHEW BELL AND ANTI CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION
A pink lustre porter mug, c.1829, the cylindrical body printed in brown with six lines of loyal verse surmounted by a small portrait flanked by flowers and foliage in green and blue within a wide pink lustre border, restored rim cracks, 13cm.

Bell was Conservative member for Northumberland from 1826 to 1831 and for South Northumberland from 1832 to 1852. In early 1829, with support from constituents, he argued strongly against Catholic emancipation.

£300-400
442.    1829 CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION
A large pink lustre porter mug, c.1829, painted in black with the inscription 'Civil & Religious Liberty All over the world' within stylized flower sprays, the rim and foot with pink lustre bands, some restoration, a star crack to the base, 12.5cm.

On 13th April 1829 the Catholic Emancipation Bill received 213 votes in favour and 109 against, receiving Royal assent the same day.

Provenance: ex Shnayerson collection, sold 12th September 1999, lot 535B.
£200-300
443.    19TH JULY 1829: GEORGE IV
An English porcelain mug, c.1829, possibly Samuel Alcock, the lilac cylindrical body applied in white with a named head in profile medallion, the underside with an oval medallion detailing the date in Roman numerals, 8.8cm.

The date recorded on the underside is the eight anniversary of George IV's 1821 coronation. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.76. £150-200
444.    1ST JANUARY 1830: FUGITIVE BRABIN PERJURY TRIAL
A fine documentary pearlware jug, dated 1830, painted with the figures of Bets, Pol and Bob Brabin, Justice Jope and five named witnesses, titled in black beside each figure, the reverse with a scene titled 'Brabin at the Rum Cask', beneath the spout with eight lines of dated presentation address to James Richards of Fursdon, Liskeard, lined in blue and gilded, 17.7cm.

A report in the Royal Cornish Gazette of 24th August 1816 referred to proceedings on Wednesday 14th August stating: 'Brabin (who was not in custody) handed witness down an empty keg, and he gave it to Hinvest who filled it with rum from one of the puncheons, and it was again returned to Brabin'. The four individuals on trial were found guilty and variously sentenced to transportation or imprisonment. Whether or not this is the same Brabin who, some years later and once again at the rum cask, perjured, is a mystery. The Cornwall Record Office have details of an apprenticeship indenture dated 3rd October 1826 for Ann Bray, aged 10 years to Robert Brabin of Liskeard and for 1832 a will of Robert Brabin, farmer of Liskeard. William Jope's obituary was published in the Legal Observer of 1854 and stated that he was called to the Bar 20th June 1820, held the office of Recorder of Liskeard and died aged 65 years.

£800-1200
445.    1830 GEORGE IV IN MEMORIAM
An English porcelain mug, c.1830, moulded and gilded to one side with a profile portrait in Classical style, the reverse with a dated tomb flanked by grieving figures, within laurel swags reserved on an apple green ground, some stained crazing, 8.6cm.
£250-350
446.    1830 GEORGE IV IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware hexagonal lobed jug, c.1830, printed in black with a portrait to one side, the reverse inscribed 'To the Memory of his late Majesty King George the IV', washed in pink and edged in pink lustre, the handle restored, 14.4cm. £100-150
447.    1830 GEORGE IV IN MEMORIAM
A dry-bodied stoneware jug, c.1830, sprigged with a Classical portrait of King George in starburst motif, flanked by winged figures bearing garlands, the rim moulded with the flowers of the Union, the handle formed as a large lion, impressed 6 to the base, the spout restored, 19.5cm.
£100-150
448.    1830 VISIT TO WORCESTER BY PRINCESS VICTORIA
A rare Chamberlain's Worcester miniature plate, c.1830, the centre with a gilt V monogram surmounted by the crown of the Princess Royal, reserved on a salmon pink ground with gilt and white flower sprays, faint red factory mark, 7.8cm.

Princess Victoria first visited Worcester at the age of 9 in 1828, and ordered porcelain from Chamberlain. Only a small number of these toy plates have survived as they were presumably ordered for the young princess to present as gifts and served the purpose of highlighting her claim to the throne. £600-800
449.    PRINCESS VICTORIA
A pearlware nursery plate, c.1830, printed in black to the well with a portrait of the young princess titled 'Princess Victoria', the border moulded with animals and flowerhead motifs, 17.5cm.

Princess Victoria sat for a portrait by William Fowler a few years previously, from which this study is taken. Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, pl.13 and front cover.
£400-600
450.    D'JECK THE THESPIAN ELEPHANT
A pearlware nursery plate, c.1830, printed in black with two figures riding upon an elephant entitled 'The Great Performer of the Adelphi', within a gadroon moulded rim, 15.5cm.

Mademoiselle d'Jeck, a performing elephant, achieved celebrity status at the Cirque Olympique in Paris during 1829. She went on to make her British debut at the Adelphi Theatre, London on 3rd December that year and subsequently toured the country. In August 1830, during an overnight stop in the town of Morpeth, whilst travelling from Edinburgh to Newcastle, she killed Jean Baptiste her keeper. Notwithstanding the fact she was an elephant, Mademoiselle d'Jeck was committed for trial in Newcastle where she was fined just five shillings on account of Baptiste's alleged cruelty. Subsequently appearing on stage in America in January 1831, she returned to Britain in the July of that year. With an otherwise undisclosed violent temperament she went on to injure or kill a number of other humans in Europe in consequence of which it was in Geneva in June 1837 that she was put to death by the use of a circus cannon, rifle shorts having failed. This whole farcical yet ultimately sad tale was recounted by the November Club at the Theatre Royal, London in 2013 and remains today one of the strangest trials in British legal history. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl. 21; and Antiques Trade Gazette, 16th December 2017, p.44 for a related article.
£150-250
451.    MARQUESS OF ANGLESEY
A Swansea pearlware nursery plate, c.1830, printed and hand-coloured with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'Marquis of Anglesea KG' [sic], the border moulded and painted with colourful birds and insects, restoration to a section of the rim, 19.2cm.

Henry Paget, 2nd Earl of Uxbridge, was created Marquess on 4th July 1815 following the Battle of Waterloo, at which he was second in command and where he lost the lower part of his right leg. A Catholic sympathiser, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in February 1828 and again in November 1830 under Earl Grey's administration, a post he held until July 1833. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pl.728.
£200-300
452.    NOVEMBER 1830 DEFEAT OF THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON'S GOVERNMENT
A pearlware hexagonal lobed jug, c.1830, printed in green to two sides with a cartoon and speech bubbles depicting William IV sweeping away the Cabinet members, titled around the foot, the rim with vignettes of Fame, restored, 15.3cm.

Against the backdrop of demand for reform and Tory intransigence, Wellington lost a vote of no confidence on 15th November 1830. The following day the King appointed Earl Grey as Prime Minister. This cartoon is after the satire by Heath published by S W Fores.
£250-350
453.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A pearlware hexagonal lobed jug, c.1831, printed in puce to two sides with a scene from the coronation service titled 'William & Adelaide crowned Sept 8 1831', a long restored crack to the body, 15.8cm. £120-180
454.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A pearlware jug, c.1831, printed in purple with a double portrait of the Royal couple seated on throne, the reverse with regal trophies, a little restoration to the spout, a star crack to the base, 10.9cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.453. £120-180
455.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A pearlware hexagonal lobed jug, c.1831, printed in purple with titled portraits of William IV and Queen Adelaide, beneath the spout with an inscription, dates and the word 'Reform' surmounted by a crown, restoration to the base, 17.5cm.

William's accession to the throne on 26th June 1830 was against the backdrop of widespread disaffection with Parliament and a popular demand for reform. The disquiet that continued until long after the coronation is more than emphasised by the potter on this jug.
£120-180
456.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A pearlware jug, c.1831, the body moulded with florets and trellis and reserved with portraits of William IV and Queen Adelaide, the rim with regal trophies within scrolling cartouches, restoration to the handle and body beneath, 18.5cm.
£100-200
457.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A Sunderland lustre jug, c.1831, printed in black and decorated in red and green, beneath the spout with a named and dated portrait of the monarch, flanked by 'The Mariners Compass' and eight lines of verse, within wide purple lustre bands, 18.5cm. £250-350
458.    1831 CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV
A large Sunderland lustre jug, c.1831, printed in black and decorated in red and green with a dated portrait medallion above four lines of loyal inscription, flanked by Britannia and a sailor holding an inscribed flag aloft, the reverse with a picture of a hen and rhyme, beneath the spout with a view of the Iron Bridge, with wide pink lustre bands, a crack to the handle and star crack to body, 19.3cm.
£300-400
459.    WILLIAM IV
A rectangular pearlware lustre plaque, c.1831, moulded and painted in bright colours with a portrait of the monarch titled 'William IVth', flanked by painted sprays of rose and thistle, the moulded frame decorated in purple lustre, incised D to the reverse, restored, 20.5cm across.
£300-400
460.    APRIL 1831 REFORM
A rare pearlware mug, c.1831, printed in puce to two sides with a figural cartoon titled 'A Thundering Castigation from the Woolsack', flanking a crown and baton resting on a tasselled cushion, 9.5cm.

This cartoon derives from the satire of the same title published by John Fairburn on 12th April 1813, which depicts the mace-wielding speaker addressing dissenters of reform.
£400-600
461.    APRIL 1831: HENRY HUNT AND REFORM
A pearlware jug, c.1831, printed in black with a continuous cartoon of top-hatted figures tempting a cockerel with a human face, titled 'Ensnaring the Preston Cock', 11.5cm.

As member of Parliament for Preston from 1830 until 1832, Henry Hunt firmly believed that the Reform Bill did not go nearly far enough. His nickname was derived from his use of red flags resembling the cheeks of a game bird. This print is after the satire of the same name by Charles James Grant, which was published by M Clarke on 20th April 1831. £300-500
462.    APRIL 1831 REFORM
A rare pearlware hexagonal lobed jug, c.1831, printed in purple to two sides with the scene of King William IV standing beside his throne in the House of Lords attended by numerous Peers as he prorogues Parliament, inscribed around the base 'The Bear Garden or a Regular Row at St Stephens!!!', restoration to the handle and spout, 18.3cm.

On 22nd April 1831 the King attended the House of Lords and dissolved Parliament, thus paving the way for the general election held between 28th April and 1st June, at which the Whigs polled a majority of 136 over the Tories, giving the Whigs real power for the first time in many decades. The cartoon is after the satire by Sharpshooter, published by John Fairburn on 30th April 1831.
£300-400
463.    1831 REFORM
A pearlware jug, c.1831, printed in dark brown with a cartoon depicting a multitude of birds' nests on a large tree, titled 'The Old Rotten Tree', running into a view of 'Constitution Hill' depicting William IV and Adelaide, restoration to the spout, 14.5cm.

The print is a re-work of the satire titled 'The Reformers Attack the Old Rotten Tree; or the Foul Nests of the Cormorants in Danger', itself a reference to the old Rotten Borough political constituencies. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.212 and Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.106.
£300-400
464.    REFORM
A large creamware porter mug, c.1831, painted in polychrome enamels with a panelled design enclosing the inscription ''The King and Reform', alternating with flowerheads and stylized flowerhead garlands, restoration, 12.2cm.
£200-300
465.    REFORM
A creamware jug, c.1831, painted in red with 'The King and his prerogative' beside stylized tulip and forget-me-not sprays, the rim with a continuous berried garland, restoration to the rim, small chips, 13.9cm.

The inscription on this jug is likely to be a reference to the King's prerogative to create new Peers, thus overwhelming the House of Lords with pro-reform voters. £250-350
466.    REFORM
A pearlware jug, c.1831, painted in polychrome enamels with a gentleman lifting a glass and saying "Reform", while another figure with a bayonet says "I will fight for the King and reform", the neck with a pink lustre band, restoration to the spout and rim, 14.4cm.
£300-400
467.    REFORM
A pearlware jug, c.1831, painted in polychrome enamels with two men in conversation, with speech bubbles declaring 'Queen Adelaide & Reform' and 'King William & Reform say I', the rim with a pink lustre band, restoration to the spout and foot, 14.4cm.
£300-400
468.    REFORM BILL
A pearlware lustre jug, c.1831, painted to one side with a caricature of William IV saying 'Be gone ye Borough mongers; I shall trust to my faithfull People', the reverse with three figures holding handkerchiefs and with a despairing speech bubble, with a pink lustre rim, restored, 17.3cm.

'Borough mongers' was the name coined years previously for those members of Parliament who had purchased seats or been elected by a small and unrepresentative electorate. A number of satires upon the subject were drawn in 1831. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.103.

£250-350
469.    REFORM BILL
A rare Bristol Pottery pearlware jug, attributed to William Fifield, brightly painted with two men coming to blows, and with two figures toasting reform, beneath the spout with a royal coat of arms inscribed 'Hy. Ann Hodge Bristol' reserved on a ground of playing cards, the rim with a fine band of flowers, a crack to the handle, 17.3cm.

Edward Davis Prothero, a Whig, was MP for Evesham from 1826 until retiring in 1830 in order to fight the seat of Bristol at which he was initially unsuccessful. In the general election of 1831 both he and James Evan Bailie were elected for Bristol, ousting the incumbent Tory, Richard Hart Davis.
£1000-1500
470.    1831 REFORM
A Sunderland lustre jug, c.1831, printed in black and decorated in flesh tones with portraits inscribed 'William IV, The only Royal Reformer since Alfred', 'Queen Adelaide' and 'Earl Grey, First Lord of the Treasury', the rim with marbled lustre decoration, a little chipping to the spout, 17.8cm.

By convention, the Prime Minister is also First Lord of the Treasury, an appointment which Earl Grey assumed upon forming an administration, at the request of the King, on 22nd November 1830. At the general election following the dissolution of Parliament by the King on 22nd April 1831, the reforming Whigs were triumphant led by Grey. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.213. £350-450
471.    1831 REFORM
A pearlware lustre porter mug, dated 1831, printed in black and decorated in colours with a portrait of Lord John Russell inscribed with loyal support for the King, Russell, Grey and Brougham, flanked by flags, painted in black with 'T H Hedley 1831', with purple lustre highlights, restoration to the base, 10.1cm.

Both Lord John Russell and Henry Brougham joined Earl Grey's minority administration in November 1830 following the defeat of Wellington's government. In the June general election that followed the King's dissolution of Parliament on 22nd April 1831, the Whigs secured a landslide victory and thus had reform within their grasp. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.222.
£250-350
472.    LORD BROUGHAM
A large pearlware porter mug, c.1831, painted in black with the inscription 'Lord Brougham will defend the Rights of the People' within sprays of thistle, the rim with a pink lustre band, the handle cracked, some chipping to the foot, 13cm.
£200-300
473.    HENRY HUNT AND REFORM
A small pearlware lustre jug, c.1831, printed in puce with four lines of verse in support of reform, echoed to the reverse, beneath the spout painted 'Hunt for Ever', beneath a wide Greek key border in pink lustre, 11.5cm.

£200-300
474.    JOHN JONES OF YESTRAD
A silver lustre banded pearlware jug, c.1831, printed in grey with an oval profile portrait titled 'John Jones. Yestrad', the reverse inscribed 'May the independence of Carmarthen never want a Supporter, nor the wings of Liberty ever loose [sic] a Feather', restored, 145mm.

Jones held the Parliamentary seat of Camarthen from 1821 until 1832. Initially voting against Reform, he secured the seat in the 1831 general election, albeit with a slim majority, and (in the case of Camarthen) delayed until August on account of injuries he sustained during the rioting at the hustings. Despite then voting for Reform he lost the subsequent general election following the dissolution of Parliament on 3rd December 1832. Cf. Exhibition catalogue for Reform! Reform! Reform! held at the Reform Club in 2005-2006, page 8.
£200-300
475.    1831 REFORM AND THE BISHOPS
An octagonal pearlware nursery plate, c.1831, the florette moulded border painted in Portobello type colours, the centre printed in black with four lines of verse, 19.2cm

In September 1831 the Second Reform Bill finally passed the House of Commons with a majority of over 100. Upon its second reading in the Lords it failed on 8th October by 41 votes partly on account of the Lords Spiritual voting against it. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.221; and Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.111.
£120-180
476.    22ND OCTOBER 1831 YEOVIL RIOTS
A large brown stoneware harvest jug, c.1831-35, moulded in high relief with grapevine, oak garlands and farming implements, the rim set with a silver-plated band, the body with a plated escutcheon engraved 'Presented by the inhabitants of Yeovil & its vicinity in testimony of their approval of the conduct of the Mudford Troop of Yeomanry Cavalry during the riots in that town in 1831, To Mr H Brooks', cracked, 24.7cm.

Following rejection of the Second Reform Bill by the House of Lords on 8th October, riots ensued in many provincial towns and cities. Notable was Yeovil where houses of a number of local dignitaries were sacked. Fearing further destruction, the Magistrates summoned the Yeomanry, who remained just outside the town but whose presence quelled the marauding rioters. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pls. 100 a and b. £250-350
477.    THOMAS ATWOOD MP
A large cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1832, printed in blue with a profile portrait inscribed 'Atwood and the People', flanked by floral sprays inscribed 'Union is Strength', 11.8cm.

Atwood founded the Birmingham Political Union, with the intention of political reform. Its first meeting was in January 1830. Adopting law abiding and non-violent tactics, he had the respect of Parliament during the period of 'The Days in May' in 1832; a period of social unrest and political tension. He subsequently represented Birmingham as a Radical from 1832 to 1840.

£150-200
478.    WILLIAM IV
A large loving cup, c.1832, the cylindrical form inscribed in gilt across two sides with 'The King and A Good Constitution', reserved on a blue ground, the rim and foot with a ropetwist moulded border, restoration to one handle, 23.8cm across.
£100-200
479.    1832 WILLIAM IV
A rectangular pearlware plaque, dated 1832, moulded and painted with a head and shoulders portrait of the monarch, a banner beneath indistinctly impressed, painted with WR IV monogram and dated 1832, the reverse incised with indistinct initials, a well restored crack, 21.1cm across.
£300-500
480.    PARLIAMENTARY AND IRISH REFORM
A teacup and saucer, c.1831, printed in purple with portraits named 'Hon E.G. Stanley' depicted holding a scroll inscribed 'Poor Ireland', and 'The Duke of Sussex' and 'Marquis of Anglesey', the cup with a banner inscribed 'Reform', all within wide borders of rose, shamrock and thistle, the saucer broken and restored, 14.8cm. (2)

Edward Stanley (later Earl of Derby and Prime Minister) became Chief Secretary for Ireland on 29th November 1830 and a member of Grey's Whig Cabinet the following year. In perusing a number of coercive measures, he frequently came into conflict with the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lord Anglesey at the time the Great Reform Bill was being debated in Parliament. Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex was known for his liberal views, which included reform of Parliament and Catholic emancipation. Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, pl.63. £100-200
481.    1832 REFORM
A cylindrical pearlware mug, c.1832, printed in purple with titled portraits of Earl Grey and Lord Althorp in ceremonious garb, flanking a vignette of flowers and flags inscribed 'Union is Strength', a star crack to the base and small chip to handle's terminal, 10cm.

Lord Althorp served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Earl Grey's government, although the portrait depicted is actually that of Baron Brougham and Vaux, who was Lord Chancellor in the same administration. See lot 482.
£100-150
482.    1832 REFORM AND LORD ALTHORP
A Chetham & Robinson pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in purple with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'Lord Althorpe' [sic], the reverse inscribed 'Reform' within a border of rose, shamrock and thistle, printed mark, some glaze chipping, 13.2cm.

£100-150
483.    1832 REFORM, EARL GREY AND BARON BROUGHAM AND VAUX
A hexagonal pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in purple with named portraits of the two men in ceremonial garb, beneath the spout inscribed 'Reform' beneath the British coat of arms, the rim with a wide band of rose, thistle and shamrock, 14.7cm. £100-150
484.    1832 REFORM, EARL GREY AND LORD JOHN RUSSELL
A lobed pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in purple with named portraits to two sides beside floral vignettes inscribed 'Champions of Reform', beneath the spout boldly printed 'Reform' within a border of Union flowers, some restoration to the rim, 17.3cm.
£150-200
485.    1832 REFORM
A lobed pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in purple with a cartoon scene of William IV dissolving Parliament, the reverse with figures holding a scroll naming supporters of Reform, beneath the spout with a figure standing upon an inscribed column and holding aloft a torch inscribed 'Truth', some restoration to the spout and rim, 15.8cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pls. 209 and 210; also Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pls.104, 105A and 105B.

£150-200
486.    1832 REFORM
A lobed pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in purple to two sides with an allegory depicting Britannia and the British lion flanked by inscribed flags, restoration to the spout, 21.7cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.211.

£150-200
487.    7TH JUNE 1832: ROYAL ASSENT OF REFORM BILL
A Machin & Thomas pearlware jug, dated 1832, printed in purple with four named portrait medallions titled 'The Zealous & Successful Promoters of Reform', inscribed with the date of assent to the reverse, beneath the spout with details of the majorities and the date '1832', printed mark to the base, 12cm.
£150-200
488.    JUNE 1832: PASSING OF THE REFORM BILL
A pearlware jug, c.1832, printed in black with Britannia seated beside a lion and holding a banner inscribed 'Reform Bill Passed June 1832', the reverse inscribed with verses named 'The Gathering of the Union', the underside printed 'Union T', restoration to the spout, 15cm.

The Gathering of the Unions, also known as the Union Hymn, was notably sung on 7th May 1832 at the congregation of Unions in Birmingham, when around 150,000 people gathered at Newhall Hill. £250-350
489.    DUKE OF YORK AND ALBANY
A brown stoneware flask, c.1827, modelled as Prince Frederick standing full length and holding a sword in his right hand, the base impressed 'HRH Duke of York' and 'Who Are You', 21cm.

£200-250
490.    DANIEL O'CONNELL
A brown stoneware flask, c.1829, modelled as the reformer holding a scroll impressed 'O'Connell the Liberator of Ireland', a chip to the back of the base, 20cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 63.
£200-300
491.    DANIEL O'CONNELL
A two-tone Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1829, modelled as the reformer depicted holding a scroll impressed 'Irish Reform Cordial', the upper half decorated in a lustrous darker brown glaze, the reverse impressed 'Denby & Codnor Park, Bournes, Potteries, Derbyshire', minor chipping, 20.3cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.87A; and Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 64. £200-300
492.    CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION AND REFORM
A large brown stoneware flask, c.1830, modelled probably as Daniel O'Connell holding a scroll moulded with a mitre and crown and inscribed 'Reform and Repeal', the reverse impressed 'I Berwick, Wine & Spirit Merchant, 4 Rose & Crown Court, Near Moorfields', the head broken off and well restored, 241mm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 81.
£150-250
493.    WILLIAM IV
A Derbyshire two-tone brown stoneware flask, c.1832, modelled as a three quarters standing figure of the monarch, impressed 'William IVth's Reform Cordial', the reverse impressed 'Belper & Denby, Bournes Potteries, Derbyshire', a crack to the base, 18.7cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, plate 102.
£150-200
494.    LORD GREY
A Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1832, modelled as the Prime Minister holding a scroll impressed 'The People's Rights' above 'Grey's Reform Cordial', the upper section decorated with a mottled brown glaze, the reverse marked for 'Belper & Denby, Bournes Potteries, Derbyshire', a small chip to the inside rim, 18.7cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 34.
£200-250
495.    LORD GREY
A Lambeth salt-glazed stoneware flask, c.1832, modelled as the prime minister holding a scroll impressed 'The True Spirit of Reform' above the title 'Grey & Reform Cordial', the upper half decorated with a brown glaze, the reverse marked 'Lambeth Pottery, Doulton & Watts, 15 High Street, Lambeth' and bearing the retailer's stamp 'W. Jones, Wine & Spirit Merchant, 50, Lambs Conduit, S.', 19cm.
£200-250
496.    LORD JOHN RUSSELL
A brown stoneware flask, c.1832, the 1st Earl Russell holding a scroll impressed 'The True Spirit of Reform' above 'Lord John Russell', the head broken off and restuck, 17.8cm.

Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.102. £100-150
497.    LORD JOHN RUSSELL
A Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1832, the 1st Earl Russell depicted holding a scroll impressed 'The True Spirit of Reform', titled to the lower half, the reverse marked 'Belper & Denby, Bournes Potteries, Derbyshire', 18.2cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 84.
£150-200
498.    LORD BROUGHAM
A Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1832, modelled as the bewigged figure of the Lord Chancellor holding a scroll impressed 'The Second Magna Carta', above 'Brougham's Reform Cordial', the reverse marked 'Belper & Deby, Bournes Potteries, Derbyshire', 18cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 13.
£150-200
499.    LORD BROUGHAM
A Lambeth brown stoneware flask, modelled as a three quarters figure of the Lord Chancellor holding a scroll inscribed 'The True Spirit of Reform' above 'Brougham's Reform Cordial', the reverse marked 'Lambeth Pottery, Doulton & Watts, 15th High Street, Lambeth', 18cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 11.
£150-200
500.    REFORM
A Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1832, modelled as a toper sitting astride a barrel, above the base impressed 'Success to Reform', the reverse marked ' Denby & Codnor Park, Bournes Potteries, Derbyshire', small chips to the base, 19.7cm.

Cf. Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 54.
£150-200
501.    EARL GREY, LORD JOHN RUSSELL AND LORD ALTHORP
A set of three glazed earthenware flasks, c.1832, each modelled as one of the three key reformers, painted in Portobello type colours, each titled and holding a scroll impressed 'The True Spirit of Reform', some restoration to Lord Althorp, a chip to the back of Lord John Russell, 16cm (3).



£300-400
502.    LORD ALTHORP
A yellow-glazed earthenware flask, c.1832, modelled as the 3rd Earl Spencer holding a scroll impressed 'The True Spirit of Reform', decorated all over in a rich canary yellow glaze, a small glaze chip to his nose, 15.4cm.

£100-150
503.    QUEEN VICTORIA
A brown stoneware flask, c.1838, modelled as the young monarch standing and holding a scroll inscribed 'My Hope is in my People', 22cm.

The sentiment impressed upon the scroll has previously led to this model being attributed as Queen Caroline. However, examples of this flask have been found with Doulton & Watts marks and with wine merchant's stamps dating from the late 1830s. Caroline was also almost invariably depicted hatted rather than crowned and not with short ruched sleeves as here. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.63.

£150-200
504.    LORD MELBOURNE
A large and rare Derbyshire brown stoneware flask, c.1838-41, modelled wearing fur-lined robes, impressed 'Lord Melbourne' to the front, the reverse with 'Oldfield & Co Makers', the upper section glazed a darker brown, a small chip to his hair, 23.5cm.

Despite a turbulent relationship with William IV, William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, was Prime Minister at the time of Victoria's accession and his coaching of the young monarch led to them forming a strong friendship. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.232; and Alan Blakeman, Reform Flasks, number 120.

Exhibited: 'Long to Reign Over Us', Newport Museum and Art Gallery, June to October 1987, number 17.

Provenance: ex Blewitt collection, sold by Historical & Collectable, 12th March 2005, lot 372.
£1000-1500
505.    DANIEL O'CONNELL
A large Brampton brown stoneware flask, c.1838-40, modelled as the Irish reformer standing with arms folded, impressed 'Daniel O'Connell to the front, the upper part glazed brown, the reverse impressed 'Oldfield & Co Makers', 22.8cm.

O'Connell championed the rights and liberties of people across the world and, in 1838, he denounced Andrew Stevenson, the American ambassador, as a "slave-breeder" and was challenged to a duel. O'Connell went on to speak on slavery and bondage including at the first Anti Slavery Convention in London in 1840.
£250-350
506.    2ND APRIL 1832: BRADBURY MURDERS
An earthenware cylindrical mug, printed in black with a view of the Moorcock Inn, a sign affixed to its side inscribed 'Bill S Q Jacks April 2nd 1832, with puce bands to the rim, 10.1cm.

The Moorcock Inn, now demolished, was once to be found between Greenfield and Holmfirth in the Pennines. On the night of Monday 2nd April 1832, it was the scene of the most violent and bloody murder of the landlord, William, and his son, Thomas Bradbury, a local gamekeeper. William, known as Bill son of Jacks, was discovered in bed and, before dying, uttered sounds which may have referred to the assailants but in the event proved inconclusive. His son, known as Tom son of Bills, was discovered in hideous circumstances dead downstairs. The crime was never solved but drew huge interest from far and wide. A substantial gravestone is to be found at Saddleworth Church, engraved with detail of the murder and three lines of verse.
£150-250
507.    22ND DECEMBER 1832: GEORGE KINLOCH
A pearlware teabowl and saucer, c.1832, printed in black with a named portrait above an inscription detailing his flight from the country and subsequent election victory for Dundee, restoration, 14.8cm. (2)

On 10th November 1819 at Dundee, Kinloch made a speech on the subject of Parliamentary reform and recent events at Peterloo, which was reported in full. With the near certainty of being arrested for sedition and found guilty, he fled to France. Coincidentally, three years later to the day, he was returned for Dundee, standing as a Whig, in the first elections following the passing of the Great Reform Bill. He died shortly thereafter on 28th March 1833. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.214; and Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.108.
£100-150
508.    HENRY BROUGHAM
A creamware mug, c.1832, the cylindrical body printed in black with a head in profile titled 'Henry Brougham' above seven lines of laudatory address, the rim and foot with a blue band, a restored rim crack, 12.5cm.

With its references to people's rights, anti-slavery and commerce it is likely this mug dates from the time of the Great Reform Bill. Despite the fact that Brougham had been raised to the Peerage on 22nd November 1830, he may feature because he was still perceived as a popular commoner at that time. Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.215. £150-250
509.    JOSEPH HUME AND SIR FRANCIS BURDETT
A pearlware porter mug, c.1833, printed in black with half-length portraits, titled 'Joseph Hume Esq FRS', and 'Sir Francis Burdett Bart MP', some staining, 11.5cm.

Both radical members of Parliament at the time of the Great Reform Bill, Hume represented Middlesex from 1830 to 1837 and Burdett Westminster from 1807 to 1837.
£80-120
510.    ANTI SLAVERY
A small pearlware nursery mug, c.1825, printed in black with a chained and kneeling figure with hands raised in supplication, the reverse with four lines of verse, 6.6cm.
£150-250
511.    ANTI SLAVERY
A small pearlware lustre jug, c.1830, printed in black with a seated figure in chains beside the titled 'Am I not a man and brother', the reverse inscribed with eight lines of verse titled 'The Negro's Complaint', the rim with a wide peach and pink lustre band, restoration to the rim and spout, 11.5cm.
£150-250
512.    ANTI SLAVERY
A pearlware nursery mug, c.1830, printed in green with figures in a plantation setting, inscribed with four lines of verse, 6.3cm.
£200-250
513.    ANTI SLAVERY
A pearlware saucer dish, c.1833, the well printed in black with the scene of an African mother cradling an infant in a tropical landscape, inscribed with four lines of verse appealing to the "Women of England", 21.8cm.
£150-200
514.    ANTI SLAVERY
A pearlware mug, c.1833, printed in black on a buff coloured ground with a kneeling African figure in a coastal landscape, the reverse inscribed with four lines of verse, restored chips to the foot, 9.4cm.
£150-250
515.    1ST AUGUST 1834: ABOLITION OF SLAVERY
A pearlware jug, dated 1834, printed in black with figures celebrating in a tropical landscape, the underside inscribed 'Negro Emancipation August 1st 1834', restoration to the spout, 12.8cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.197.
£200-250
516.    1ST AUGUST 1838: APPRENTICE FREEDOM
An earthenware plate, dated 1838, printed in puce with a scene of young African figures celebrating before a small hut beneath a flag inscribed 'Liberty', titled 'Freedom First of August', within a dense flowerhead border, a restored rim crack, 27cm.

£150-200
517.    ABOLITION OF SLAVERY AND WILBERFORCE IN MEMORIAM
A pearlware porter mug, c.1885, printed in black with an African figure standing with arms outstretched in a tropical landscape surmounted by a heavenly shroud inscribed 'Wilberforce', the sides and underside with vignettes and verses extolling agriculture and farming, the interior with a dark red border of grapevine and corn, circa 1885, 11.2cm. £100-200
518.    16th OCTOBER 1834: PARLIAMENT FIRE
A small octagonal pearlware nursery plate, c.1834, the well printed in brown with boats on the Thames in front of the burning Houses of Parliament, titled above and below, the rim moulded with husk swags and stylized flowerheads, 14cm.

The use of tally sticks as a most effective and incorruptible method of recording repayment of debt ceased in 1826. On Thursday 16th October 1834, instructions were given that the two remaining cart loads of now redundant split hazel sticks be burnt in the two underfloor stoves beneath the House of Lords. With the job concluded, the workmen retired by 5 o'clock but an hour later the Palace of Westminster was an inferno; the spectacle being recorded by Turner and other artists. Westminster Hall was saved thanks to the heroic efforts of firefighters and a change in wind direction.

£300-400
519.    REPEAL THE UNION WITH IRELAND
A large pearlware jug, c.1835, printed in black with an idyllic country scene titled 'Ireland With the Repeal', the reverse with a scene of Daniel O'Connell addressing a crowd outside the Four Courts Building in Dublin, titled 'Ireland Without the Repeal', the neck with a wide blue band, 21.3cm.

The Repeal Association was an Irish mass movement set up by Daniel O'Connell in 1830 to repeal the 1800 Act of Union with Britain. Prevalent between 1832 and 1841, it was superseded by the Young Ireland Movement in the late 1840s.
£500-800
520.    1835 GENERAL ELECTION IN SHROPSHIRE
A large cobalt blue glazed Coalport electioneering jug, dated 1835, decorated in gilt with details of the twelve Conservative members, the reverse with a quote from Shakespeare's Henry VIII, beneath the spout with a crown and shield highlighted in red, the neck inscribed for the Lord Lieutenant, beneath the handle inscribed 'T Wildig, Shrewsbury', the handle restored, 19.6cm.

Thomas Wildig was a china and glass dealer on Pride Hill in Shrewsbury.
£400-600
521.    FREE TRADE
A pair of Minton two-handled vases, c.1835, the urn-shaped bodies well painted with panels of flowers and fruits in the manner of Thomas Steele, between moulded leaf bands reserved on a pale peach ground, raised on cylindrical bases inscribed in black for free trade, unfettered commerce and unity of all nations, upon integral square plinths, restorations, 35cm. (2)

Following the conclusion of the Napoleonic Wars, the Corn Laws introduced tariffs and trade restrictions in 1815 in an effort to reduce money flowing out of the country. Between 1830 and 1841, with the Whigs largely in power, pressure was constantly being brought to bear for their repeal.

Provenance: with Mercury Antiques, October 1995.
£800-1200
522.    1836 NEW MARRIAGE ACT
A pearlware nursery plate, c.1836, printed and hand-coloured with a blacksmith marrying a young couple beneath the title 'A New Marriage Act', the rim moulded and painted with flower sprays, 17.5cm.

The New Marriage Act of August 1836 gave legality to weddings held in a wider variety of religious faiths.

£150-200
523.    1835 MUNICIPAL REFORM ACT
A pearlware jug, c.1837-40, painted in blue 'The corruption of Tory corporations died Dec'r 26th 1836', 'May every Parson shoot a Lawyer and be hang'd for it' and 'A Speedy Downfall to all state Paupers' each within a green foliate cartouche, 17.4cm.

The Act, which was part of the Whig programme of reform, addressed local Government in the incorporated boroughs in England and Wales. It received Royal Assent on 9th September 1835, and came into effect on the 1st January following with 26th December 1836 being a pivotal date.

£200-300
524.    1837 WILLIAM IV IN MEMORIAM
A rare small Sunderland lustre jug, c.1837, printed in red with figures grieving at a tomb inscribed with the monarch's dated of death, within a stylized foliate border and pink lustre band, minor chipping to the spout, 12.5cm.

Cf. John & Jennifer May, Commemorative Pottery 1780-1900, pl.88. £400-600
525.    1837 WILLIAM IV IN MEMORIAM
A rare Sunderland lustre porter mug, c.1837, printed in black and highlighted in colours with a portrait inscribed with relevant dates, restored, 9.7cm.

Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, plate 15.
£300-400
526.    1838 CORONATION OF QUEEN VICTORIA
A Staffordshire (Read and Clementson) pearlware mug, c.1838, printed in puce with portraits of Victoria and the Duchess of Kent flanking the inscription 'Victoria Regina' above a crown, flowers of the Union and dates, printed mark, 9.8cm.
£400-600
527.    1841 GENERAL ELECTION IN SHROPSHIRE
A large cobalt blue glazed Coalport electioneering jug, dated 1841, decorated in gilt with details of the twelve Conservative elected members for the county, and with other religious and trade promoting inscriptions, beneath the handle inscribed 'Wildig Shrewsbury', 23.5cm.

Thomas Wildig was a china and glass dealer on Pride Hill in Shrewsbury. £400-600
528.    ANTI CORN LAWS
A large pearlware coffee pot and cover, c.1845, the oviform body with rib moulding, printed in puce to two sides with a ship inscribed 'Good in Exchange', sailing into a harbour titled 'No Corn Law!!', with scroll moulded handle and spout, some restoration to the spout, the cover's finial broken and reattached, 31.3cm. (2)
£150-200
529.    FREE TRADE
A Staffordshire pearlware tobacco jar with plunger, cover and stand, 19th century, printed in black with an inscribed harbour scene, the reverse with a sailing vessel in the background flying a flag inscribed 'Free Trade', the underside of the jar with TP monogram possibly for Thomas Plant, the base inscribed 1877 in puce, 24cm overall. (4)

Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, pls. 129 and 130.
£150-200
530.    MURDER IN THE RED BARN
A copper lustre jug, mid 19th century, printed in black with a building titled 'The Red Barn', the reverse with game birds, and a smaller jug with copper lustre and yellow ground printed with named portraits of Cornwallis surrendering and Lafayette flanked by winged figures, the smaller jug restored, 15.2cm max. (2)

The Red Barn at Polstead in Suffolk was the scene of the horrific murder of Maria Marten by her lover, the Squire William Corder in 1827. The two had arranged to meet at the barn and elope. Instead, Maria was murdered and her body buried in the barn. Corder fled to London, married, started a new life and sent letters to Maria's family claiming she was in good health. Corder was later arrested, tried, found guilty and publicly hanged in Bury St Edmunds in 1828. Such was the interest in this crime that the barn became an attraction and souvenirs were produced. £100-150
531.    1847 DANIEL O'CONNELL IN MEMORIAM
An English porcelain teacup and saucer, c.1847, printed in puce and highlighted in blue, green and yellow with angelic figures supporting a cartouche with a portrait of O'Connell inscribed 'Repeal', within a pink lustre scroll border, the saucer marked 390 in green, an oversprayed star crack to the saucer, 14.6cm. (2)

Daniel O'Connell was relentless in his pursuit of repeal of restrictions upon Roman Catholics, Irish union with Britain and the Corn Laws.
£100-150
532.    1852 DUKE OF WELLINGTON IN MEMORIAM
A Parian type jug, mid 19th century, moulded in high relief with a scene of the seated Duke surrounded by figures, glazed to the interior, and a pearlware nursery plate printed in black with an inscribed and dated equestrian portrait, both restored, 19.3cm max. (2)

The seven figures attending the Duke are thought to be Lord and Lady Charles Wellesley, Dr McArthur, Mr Hulke, the local apothecary, and his son, Wellington's valet, Kendall, and manservant, Collin. Cf. John May, Victoria Remembered, pl.189 for the plate.
£100-150
533.    1866 POACHER WILLIAM COLLIER'S MURDER OF GAMEKEEPER THOMAS SMITH
A large Staffordshire stone china jug, c.1866, moulded in relief and painted in bright enamels with a scene of Collier with his wife and a child at a cottage door, the reverse with the violent struggle between Collier and Smith, inscribed around the foot 'Presented to James Morrey, By A Friend', the handle moulded with a hare, restoration to the rim and top of handle, 25.7cm.

The incident that led to the last, and somewhat botched, public hanging in Stafford on the 7th August 1866 was one of poaching and murder. To support his wife and seven children, William Collier of Kingsley in the Staffordshire moorlands was, by repute, a poacher. An encounter with the gamekeeper, Thomas Smith, at nearby Whiston Eaves, resulted in a fierce struggle and Smith being bludgeoned to death. Collier was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged. George Smith, a Black Country hangman with a reputation for blundering, undertook the execution. Using old rope, his first attempt failed and, with the assembled crowd's anger mounting, his second attempt was successful.

James Morrey is listed on the Staffordshire census returns between 1841 and 1881 as a potter living in Hanley. £300-500