The Robin Simpson Collection of Commemoratives
on Wednesday 8th September 2021
Lots: 1-50 of 533
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Lot 1
CHARLES II
A Delft charger, late 19th/20th century, painted in blue with a scene depicting the Boscobel Oak with the King's head emerging from the foliage, three soldiers and buildings with spires in the background, within a border of scrolling flowers and foliage, broken and restored, 32.7cm.

In the final battle of the Civil War, fought at Worcester on 3rd September 1651, Charles II's army was well and truly overwhelmed by Cromwell's New Model Army. Charles escaped a Parliamentary patrol by hiding in an oak tree in the grounds of Boscobel House.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson Antiques, September 1996.

Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £300
Lot 2
WILLIAM AND MARY
A London delftware Royal blue dash charger, c.1690, painted in blue, yellow and manganese with full-length portraits of the Royal couple flanked by tents, beneath the initials 'WMR', the rim with a blue dash border, the underside with a pale blue lead glaze, a short hairline to the rim, 32.8cm.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, June 2016.


Estimate:  £3000 - 4000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £8000
Lot 3
WILLIAM AND MARY
A large Delft charger, c.1690, painted in blue with crowned half-length portraits of William and Mary inscribed 'KWD3 MSKIV GBT', the rim with a border of birds, flowers and foliage, broken and repaired, 38.5cm.

The initialled inscription translates as 'King William the Third, Mary Stuart Queen of Great Britain'.

Illustrated: Grosvenor House Antiques Fair exhibition catalogue, 'A Tribute to the Age of William and Mary', London, June 1989, front cover.

Estimate:  £1200 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2000
Lot 4
QUEEN MARY II
A Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1688-94, the spherical body moulded with a portrait oval inscribed 'MARIA D.G. MAG. BRIT. FRANC. ET HIB. REGINA &' , flanked by scrolling flower stems highlighted in blue and reserved on a manganese ground, a rim crack, 17cm.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, February 1997.


Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2500
Lot 5
WILLIAM III
A Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1695, the globular body of a pale grey tone, applied with an octagonal portrait medallion inscribed 'WILHELMVS III D.G. MAG BRIT. FRANC. ET. HIB. REX.', flanked by stylized scrolling flowers, a short crack to the foot and base, 12.5cm.

Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1300
Lot 6
WILLIAM III
A Delft charger, c.1690-95, painted in manganese and yellow with a three-quarter length portrait initialled PWD3, the wide rim with a wash border incised with stylized flower scrolls, the reverse with a buff lead glaze, restored cracks to the rim, 34.7cm.

Estimate:  £1200 - 1800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1600
Lot 7
QUEEN ANNE
A London delftware plate, c.1702-14, painted in blue with a half-length crowned portrait flanked by the initials 'AR', within a banded and looped border, extensively restored, 22cm.

Provenance: sold Christie's, 27th April 1998, lot 4.


Estimate:  £2500 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £3200
Lot 8
QUEEN ANNE
A large Westerwald stoneware jug, c.1702-10, applied with a roundel bearing the crowned initials AR for Queen Anne within a narrow laurel wreath, within incised and sprigged foliate and floral scrolls on a blue ground, cracked, the base probably broken out and restuck, 23.4cm.
Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £800
Lot 9
DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH
A small delftware blue dash charger, c.1710, probably Bristol, painted in blue, yellow and green with a standing figure of the duke in armour holding a baton, between the initials 'DM' and flanked by sponged trees, the rim with a blue dash border, restored, 29.4cm.

John Churchill, born in 1650, was a statesman renowned for his organisational, logistic and diplomatic skills. He was appointed Captain General of the British Army and raised to the Dukedom in 1702. He died in 1722. Cf. Anthony Ray, English Delftware in The Robert Hall Warren Collection Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, pl 2, for a similar example. The same portrait was also used to represent Prince George of Denmark, the Duke of Ormonde, Prince Eugene, George I and George II, the initials identifying the figure.

Provenance: ex Beaumont collection; Vogel collection, sold Sotheby's, New York, 19th January 2019, lot 672.





Estimate:  £2000 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £5500
Lot 10
1716 QUEEN ANNE IN MEMORIAM
A delftware plate, dated 1716, painted in blue with the inscription 'To the Pious Memory of Queen Anne '1716', within a foliate wreath border, restored rim sections, 22.2cm.

Dated two years after Queen Anne's death in 1714, this inscription has its roots in high-Tory support and anti-Jacobite sentiment and propaganda. Cf. Lipski and Archer, Dated English Delftware, p.76, nos. 289 and 290 for similar examples dated 1717.

Provenance: with Jonathan Horne, November 2000.

Estimate:  £2000 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2500
Lot 11
GEORGE I
A London delftware 'Union' plate, c.1714, probably Vauxhall, painted in red, green and blue with crossed thistle and rose stems surmounted by a crown and the initials 'GR' within a blue lined border, a long rim crack, 21.1cm.

The crossed thistle and rose motif first appeared on AR plates for Queen Anne to celebrate the Act of Union of 1707. Cf. Frank Britton, London Delftware, p.142, fig.119.

Provenance: with Alistair Sampson, November 1999.


Estimate:  £2000 - 2500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2500
Lot 12
GEORGE I
A London delftware plate, c.1714-27, painted in blue, green and red with a half-length crowned portrait flanked by the initials 'GR', within narrow blue and red bands, broken and restored, 22.2cm.

While it is likely that this plate commemorates George I, the same portrait was used by potters to commemorate the Coronation of George II in 1727.

Provenance: with John Howard, June 2015.

Estimate:  £1500 - 2000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2800
Lot 13
BRISTOL ELECTION OF THOMAS COSTER
A Bristol delftware plate, c.1734, painted in blue with a figure of Justice overcoming Envy, depicted as a tortured figure holding a paper entitled 'The Petition', beneath an arch inscribed 'Libertas Populi' and the initials 'TC', within a border of barbed floral panels and scrolls, repaired rim sections, 22.1cm.

In the 1734 general election Thomas Coster, a vigorous opponent of Walpole's Excise schemes, was returned for the Tories against the Whigs, Sir Abraham Elton and Mr Scrope, for Bristol. Coster's election was, however, contested and a petition was presented to the House of Commons by the Mayor of the Corporation, alleging invalid votes. Much of one sitting of the House was taken up hearing the matter, notwithstanding which the petition was subsequently withdrawn. Coster died in 1739.

Provenance: sold Sotheby's 21st July 1981, lot 40; subsequently with Jonathan Horne and ex Longridge Collection, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 3 November 2011, lot 336.


Estimate:  £2000 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £3000
Lot 14
BATTLE OF PORTOBELLO
A Liverpool delftware plate, c.1740, finely painted in pale blue with a scene of warships engaged in the bombardment of the fort, the rim with a formal grapevine border, extensively broken and restuck, 26.9cm.

In the conflict between the English and Spanish in the Caribbean that became known as 'The War of Jenkins Ear', and following earlier failed British blockade attempts, Vice-Admiral Edward Vernon, against much criticism and with a squadron of just six ships, appeared off Portobello on 20th November 1739. With the wind from the east, Vernon attacked the Castillo del Hierro and the English scaled the walls of the fort. The Spanish surrendered, the English occupied and destroyed much of the town before withdrawing after three weeks, thus ending the town's main function as a Spanish maritime base. Vernon's popularity was short-lived, however, following his later failed attempt to take the fortress at Cartagena. Suffering heavy British casualties in Cuba, he returned to England in 1742 disgraced.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 2000.

Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £900
Lot 15
ADMIRAL VERNON AND THE BATTLE OF PORTOBELLO
A small European-decorated Chinese porcelain bowl, c.1740, originally decorated with a pagoda island landscape in underglaze blue, later enamelled in London, the interior with a scene of the Admiral holding a baton, with two ships in the background, within a porthole border with flags, spears, cannon and drums, the exterior with sailing vessels, small figures and enamel detailing, a small rim chip, minor footrim chipping, 11.2cm diameter.

See footnote to lot 14.

Provenance: the Watney Collection of Dutch and English Decorated Chinese Porcelain, Bonhams, 7th November 2003, lot 51.


Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £800
Lot 16
1746 DUKE OF CUMBERLAND AND CULLODEN
A large Chinese export porcelain mug, mid 18th century, brightly painted with a half-length portrait of the Duke within a circular gilded border inscribed 'In Remembrance of the Glorious Victory at Culloden Apl. 16th 1746', flanked by floral and foliate sprays, the rim with a gilt spearhead border, a large glaze crack, 15.5cm.

William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland was the second son of George III. He commanded the British forces that vanquished Charles Edward Stuart at Culloden, three miles east of Inverness. Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.110, where the author attributes the portrait to be after that by John Wootton of 1744.

Provenance: with Cohen & Cohen, October 2017 together with a Certificate of BADA.

Estimate:  £2000 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2500
Lot 17
GEORGE II
A Battersea enamel oval portrait plaque, c.1755, engraved by Ravenet and printed in manganese with a Classical head in profile, titled 'GEORGIUS. II. REX.', within a gilded metal frame, restored, 10cm overall.

Estimate:  £300 - 400 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £420
Lot 18
DUKE OF CUMBERLAND
A Battersea enamel oval plaque, c.1755-60, engraved by Ravenet and printed in puce with a head and shoulders profile, wearing an armour breastplate and ermine-lined robes, within a gilt metal frame, faint cracking, 10.2cm overall.

See footnote to lot 16.

Cf. Therle and Bernard Hughes, English Painted Enamels, p.18, fig. 2, page 18. Sold Bonhams, 10th June 2005, lot 81.


Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £750
Lot 19
FREDERICK PRINCE OF WALES
A good Battersea enamel oval portrait plaque, c.1755, engraved by Ravenet and printed in puce with head and shoulders profile, wearing armour pinned with the Garter Star, within a gilt metal frame, 10.2cm overall.

The Prince of Wales died on 31st March 1751. Cf. Egan Mew, Battersea Enamels, figure 3, for a similar plaque from the Schreiber collection.

Provenance: sold Phillips, 6th June 2001, lot 212.

Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £800
Lot 20
CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER
A Battersea oval enamel plaque, c.1753-56, printed in pale manganese with a half-length portrait of a Chancellor of the Exchequer in full wig, lace cravat and elaborate embroidered jacket, the plaque 8.5cm high, in a modern frame.

The identity of the subject is discussed by Bernard Watney, 'The Chancellor on a Battersea Enamel', ECC Trans Vol 7, pt 1 (1968). W B Honey suggested that the print was the work of two hands, the head by Ravenet and the costume by Hancock. See The Connoisseur, Vol LXXIV, 1932. Watney concluded that the subject was perhaps Henry Pelham after an engraving by John Hinton; however, more recent suggestion has been made that the likeness more closely resembles Henry Boyle, 1st Earl of Shannon and Speaker of the Irish House of Commons from 1733 to 1753, as depicted in a mezzotint engraved by John Brooks and sold by Thomas Jefferys and William Herbert.

Provenance: sold (as Henry Pelham) Phillips, 6th June 2001, lot 210.

Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £400
Lot 21
LORD BLAKENEY
A rare English rectangular enamel plaque, c.1756-61, painted with a monk holding a lantern over an oval portrait, titled 'Ld. Blakeney' on the plinth beneath, mounted in a gilt metal frame, 9.2cm overall.

William Blakeney was Member of Parliament for Kilmallock from 1725 to 1757. He took part in the War of Jenkins Ear (see lot 14), being appointed Brigadier-General. Following the disastrous campaign in the West Indies he returned to Britain and was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Stirling Castle in 1742. After the Battle of Culloden (see lot 16) he was promoted Lieutenant General and given command of the Highlands. In 1748 he was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Menorca. During the early part of the Seven Years War, and despite gallant efforts to defend the island, Blakeney surrendered on 29th June 1756, the Garrison being given free passage to Gibraltar. Absolved of any blame for the defeat, Blakeney was raised to the Irish Peerage the same year and retired from military service to Ireland where he died on 20th September 1761. He is buried in the nave of Westminster Abbey. A print published in 1756, engraved by James McArdell after George Chalmers was inspiration for this plaque. Cf. Bernard Watney, EEC Trans, vol 9, part 3, plate 171.

Provenance: sold Bonhams, 18th April 2012, lot 97.

Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1300
Lot 22
FREDERICK THE GREAT
A Staffordshire salt-glazed stoneware teapot and cover, c.1758, the squat globular body painted in coloured enamels with a head and shoulders profile inscribed 'Fred. III Prufsiae Rex' [sic], the reverse with the crowned Prussian eagle above the ribboned inscription 'Semper Sublimis', each within a scrolling cartouche reserved on an ermine ground, a restuck chip to the cover, 18.5cm across. (2)

Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, was the great nephew of George I. Following the Westminster Convention of January 1756, he enjoyed the support of the English. An accomplished military strategist, he was eventually victorious in the Seven Years War of 1756 to 1763 leading to the power of Prussia in Europe.

Provenance: sold Sotheby's, 15th April 1997, lot 161.


Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1400
Lot 23
MARINE SOCIETY
A rare Worcester slop bowl, c.1760, printed in black with four vignettes including a naval engagement, Britannia and inscribed figural scenes of sailors and their families on the exterior, the interior with a heavily worn print of George II, some wear, minor footrim chips, 15.4cm dia.

Established in 1756 by Jonas Hanway, the Marine Society offered Naval training to less fortunate boys to equip them to crew on the King's ships and develop a respected career. Cf. National Maritime Museum 'A Celebration of the Sea' by Rina Prentice, page 56. Sold Christie's, South Kensington, 26th September 1996, lot 94.

Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £650
Lot 24
FREDERICK THE GREAT
A small Worcester mug, c.1760, the cylindrical body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a half length portrait titled 'King of Prussia', with a winged figure of Fame, centred by military trophies and flags each inscribed with battle honours, signed with RH monogram and anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, a filled chip to the rim, 8.6cm.

See footnote to lot 22 and Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.116.

Estimate:  £200 - 300 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 25
ADMIRAL BOSCAWEN AND THE CAPTURE OF LOUISBOURG
A rare Worcester mug, c.1760, the cylindrical body printed in black with a three-quarter length portrait of the Admiral holding a chart titled 'Louisbourg', the reverse with two warships, centred by the arms of Boscawen, 8.7cm.

This portrait of Admiral Edward Boscawen is after the 1747 painting by John Faber, but has been embellished with the inscribed map of Cape Breton. Highly regarded as a fighting Admiral, Boscawen was wounded in the neck in 1747 in action off Cape Finisterre thus earning him the nickname 'Wrynecked Dick'. Boscawen took Louisbourg at the mouth of the St Lawrence River in July 1758, paving the way for the assault on Quebec the following year. Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, number 8.



Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £3000
Lot 26
GEORGE II
A small Worcester mug, c.1760, the baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a portrait of George II, the reverse with a ship, trophies of war and a putto holding aloft the cap of liberty surmounted by the crown, signed with RH monogram, inscribed 'Worcester' and with anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, 8.6cm.

Among the notable British victories of the 'Annus Mirabilis' of 1759 was that of Quebec during the Seven Years War. It thwarted France's ambitious plans of advancement, coming as it did towards the end of George II's reign and his death on 25th October 1760. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.9.

Provenance: with Roderick Jellicoe, August 1993.


Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £800
Lot 27
WILLIAM PITT (THE ELDER)
A good Worcester cylindrical porcelain mug, c.1760, printed in black with a half-length portrait of Pitt after the portrait by William Hoare, flanked by vignettes of Minerva and Fame, 8.8cm.

William Pitt 'The Elder' was born in 1708. Between 1756 and 1761 (other than a brief period in 1757) he was leader of the House. He was single minded in his determination for victory in the Seven Years War, which coincided with this period. Raised to the Peerage as Earl of Chatham in 1766 he became Britain's oldest Prime Minster from 1768 until his death in 1778.
Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1900
Lot 28
GENERAL JAMES WOLFE
A rare Worcester cylindrical mug, c.1760, printed in black with a half-length portrait flanked by prints of Mars and Fame, a putto above with a laurel diadem, 12cm.

Following the success at Louisburg in the Seven Years War, William Pitt made Wolfe commander of the force that sailed up the St Lawrence River. On 13th September 1759, in a surprise attack, he took Quebec from the French. Mortally wounded by three musket shots he survived long enough to learn of victory, one that was to lead to the collapse of French power in the new world. For this Wolfe was accorded lasting fame in history.

Provenance: ex Pares Wilson Collection, sold Bonhams, 9th Sep 2009, Lot 91; and G W Capell Collection, sold Sotheby's, 16th February 1965, Lot 91. Cyril Cook, Life and Work of Robert Hancock, Item 120.

Estimate:  £1500 - 2000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £4200
Lot 29
1760 ACCESSION OF GEORGE III
A rare Longton Hall mug, c.1760, the baluster body printed in black by John Sadler of Liverpool with a half-length portrait of the new monarch, flanked by foliate sprigs and the ribboned inscription 'George III King of Great Britain', signed 'J. Sadler Liverp.', a long rim crack, 10.1cm,

Provenance: with Simon Spero, September 2001; formerly E & J (Joseph) Handley Collection, Carmel, California. Paper label for the Betchworth Collection.

Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1100
Lot 30
GEORGE III
A London delftware plate, c.1760, well painted in blue with a head and shoulders profile portrait of the king pinned with the Garter Star, inscribed 'GR III', three filled rim chips, 22cm.

Cf. J C Austin, British Delft at Williamsburg, p.140, no.190. It is likely that the portrait by Jeremiah Meyer is the source for this portrait. The existence of a companion plate depicting Queen Charlotte Sophia of Mecklenburg-Strelitz suggests these plates were made at the time of their marriage in 1761.

Provenance: with John Howard, April 2018.

Estimate:  £2500 - 3000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £5000
Lot 31
PRINCE FERDINAND OF BRUNSWICK
A rare Longton Hall porcelain mug, c.1760, printed in black with a portrait titled 'The Illustrious Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick', flanked by vignettes of military trophies inscribed 'Minden', and a battle scene, a rim crack and filled rim chip, 9.8cm.

At the Battle of Minden on 1st August 1759, Field Marshall Ferdinand of Brunswick won a decisive victory against the French, thus ending the imminent threat to Hanover. For this he was awarded the Order of the Garter by George II and a vote of thanks by the British Parliament.

Provenance: Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 6 and ex Frank Arnold collection.



Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1200
Lot 32
GEORGE III
A very rare small Worcester mug, c.1761, the baluster body printed in purple with a half-length profile portrait of the monarch looking to dexter, wearing an elaborate jacket pinned with the Garter Star, flanked by a vignettes of Britannia and Fame, a long restored crack and filled rim chip, 8.6cm.

Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 4 for a similar mug.

Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £950
Lot 33
MARQUESS OF GRANBY
A large Worcester mug, c.1761, the baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with a portrait of Granby flanked by vignettes of Fame and Mars, a putto in flight above with a diadem of laurels, 15cm.

This engraving was adapted by Hancock from one by Richard Houston published in 1760 and after a portrait by Joshua Reynolds. General John Manners, Marquess of Granby, commanded the British contingent fighting under the Duke of Brunswick against the French from 1759 until the end of the Seven Years War, including the Battles of Minden and Warburg. At the latter, a corps of 20,000 French was routed. In the charge Granby lost his hat and wig, hence this depiction bald-headed. This was an incident that caused much amusement in the ranks and led to the expression 'Going at it bald-headed'!

Provenance: formerly the Joseph M. Handley Collection. Cf. Simon Spero Exhibition 2000, item 7.


Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1600
Lot 34
MARQUESS OF GRANBY
A Wedgwood creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, the globular body printed in black by Sadler with a named head and shoulders portrait flanked by military trophies, the reverse with a scene of two cavalrymen engaged in combat within a scrolling cartouche and military trophies, restoration to the end of the spout, 16.5cm across. (2)

Granby sat for Sir Joshua Reynolds no fewer than twelve times; in turn, Francois-Germain Aliamet engraved a plate which was used by Sadler. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 406 and 407.

Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £650
Lot 35
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Wedgwood creamware teapot and cover, c.1762, the globular body printed in black by Sadler with a named head and shoulders profile of the queen, the reverse with a small oval medallion with superimposed named portraits surmounted by a crown and royal trophies, restoration to the end of the spout, the cover cracked, 15.5cm across. (2)

This profile of Queen Charlotte is taken from the portrait by Jeremiah Mayer, engraved by Francois-Germain Aliamet. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, pls. 393, 395 and 396.

Provenance: ex Kanter Collection, sold Skinners of Boston, Massachusetts, 31st May 1997, lot 70.
Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2200
Lot 36
1761 MARRIAGE AND CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Staffordshire redware teapot and cover, c.1761, the squat cylindrical body applied with the crowned couple holding hands surmounted by the initials 'GR' and flanked by full-length hatted figures, restoration to the cover, 15cm across. (2)

Cf. Stella Beddoe, A Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.027 for a moulding of George and Charlotte holding hands.

Provenance: with Garry Atkins, March 2003.


Estimate:  £600 - 1000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £900
Lot 37
1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, moulded with the Royal couple crowned and seated beneath putti, painted in coloured enamels, the cover heavily restored, 18cm across. (2)

Estimate:  £600 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £500
Lot 38
1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1761, the globular body moulded with crowned heads of the new monarchs, the reverse with an exotic bird, each flanked by scrolling foliage, decorated in broad stripes of green and yellow, extensively restored, 17.7cm across. (2)

Estimate:  £400 - 600 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £380
Lot 39
1761 CORONATION OF GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A creamware tea canister, c.1761, the chamfered rectangular body moulded with crowned half-length portraits of the Royal couple, painted in brightly coloured enamels, the shoulders painted with floral sprays, the cover lacking, the base broken out and restored, 11.5cm.
Estimate:  £600 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £500
Lot 40
GEORGE III AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A pearlware tea canister and cover, c.1762-65, the flattened hexagonal body moulded to two sides with half-length portraits of the Royal couple, painted in brightly coloured enamels, the shorter sides painted with floral spays, inscribed 'Ann Wright' in black beneath the neck, a crack around the base, rim and cover restored, 18.6cm.

Charlotte's portrait is after the engraving by Thomas Frye dated 1762. Cf. Lincoln Hallinan, British Commemoratives; Royalty, Politics, War and Sport, pl.18.

Estimate:  £600 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 41
1766 ACESSION OF CHARLES III, JACOBITE KING OF BRITAIN
An important Staffordshire salt-glazed stoneware teapot and cover, c.1766, the globular body decorated in opaque white enamel with rose flowers, buds and leaves on a rich blue ground, inscribed 'C*R III', with crabstock handle and spout, minor faults, 20.7cm across. (2)

Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender) was Catholic, the eldest son of James Francis Stuart (the Old Pretender) and grandson of James II of England (1633-1701) who succeeded to the throne upon the death of his brother Charles II in 1685. In the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the Protestant William III and Mary took the crown of Britain, leaving James II to escape to France. On 1st January 1766 James Francis Stuart died, leaving Charles Edward Stuart to claim the British crown as Charles III in exile, as part of the Jacobite succession. This teapot is believed to be one of only two known examples, the other being in the British Museum (No. 1938,0218.1.CR).

Provenance: ex Byrom family collection, sold Lyon and Turnbull, 14th May 2015, lot 61. The Byrom family from the North of England were notable Jacobite supporters, forming a collection of associated relics.

Estimate:  £5000 - 8000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £10000
Lot 42
1763 CIDER ACT
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1763-66, the ovoid body painted in black with the inscription 'No Cyder Act', the reverse with 'Apples at Liberty' within red scrolling cartouches, incised with a trellis band, set with crabstock spout and double strap handle, the cover with a floral knop, 16.6cm across. (2)

To pay for the ever-mounting cost of the Seven Years War, Lord Bute introduced the Cider Bill in 1763. Such was its unpopularity, especially in the West Country, that he was forced to resign later that same year in favour George Grenville. Grenville was successful in defeating an opposition motion to repeal the bill the following year, however it was finally repealed in 1766. This style of painting is often associated with the workshops of Robinson and Rhodes of Leeds but recent excavations in Staffordshire have produced similar styles of painting to that of the Leeds workshop.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, March 2007, item 07/36 in their catalogue.


Estimate:  £2000 - 2500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £7000
Lot 43
JOHN WILKES
A creamware teapot and cover, c.1763-65, probably Leeds, the globular body inscribed in black with 'Wilkes & Liberty', the reverse with 'No. 45', each inscription within a red and black scrolling cartouche, with moulded spout and scroll handle, restoration, 19.5cm across. (2)

John Wilkes (1725-1797) was a radical English politician who represented the seat of Aylesbury. Also a journalist, his criticism of the King's opening of Parliament speech in issue 45 of his magazine 'The North Briton' earned him a warrant for his arrest for libel in 1763. Citing parliamentary privilege, he was cleared of the charge and went on to become Lord Mayor of London in 1774.

Provenance: with Sampson & Horne, June 2007.

Estimate:  £1500 - 2000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £4800
Lot 44
JOHN WILKES
A creamware mug, c.1763-65, probably Leeds, the cylindrical body painted in black with the inscription 'Wilkes and Liberty No.45' within a red and black scrolling cartouche, extensively restored, 9.8cm high.

See footnote to lot 43.
Estimate:  £800 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £4200
Lot 45
JOHN WILKES AND LORD MANSFIELD
A Chinese export porcelain punchbowl, c.1765-70, painted to two sides with a portrait cartouche of Wilkes flanked by figures representing Sergeant Glyn and Earl Temple above the ribboned inscription 'Always Ready in a Good Cause', and a cartouche of Mansfield flanked by Lord Bute and the Devil above the inscription 'Justice Sins Pitie', the rim inscribed in black 'Wilkes & Liberty', broken and restored, 25.7cm dia.

In February 1764 Wilkes was convicted in absentia for seditious and blasphemous libel before Lord Mansfield in King's Bench, despite the whole case being littered with contention. Glyn appeared for the defence and Temple was Wilkes' patron; Bute had served as Prime Minister until retiring in 1763. Refusing to return to England for sentence, Wilkes was outlawed. Such was the public interest in the case that engraved satires were copied onto Chinese wares. Cf. Osgoode Hall Law Journal, (volume 25 number 3) III. Wilkes and the Judges: 1763-1768 also Potted History: Henry Willett's Ceramic Chronicle of Britain, pl.491.

Provenance: ex Rouse collection, sold Sotheby's, Billingshurst, 10th March 1999, lot 82.

Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £800
Lot 46
JOHN WILKES
A Derby figure of the politician and journalist, c.1775, standing and resting one hand on a square plinth, atop of which rests a scroll inscribed 'Bill of Rights', draped in a long pink cloak, a putto to his right, holding a Phrygian cap on the end of a stick and supporting a book titled 'Lock [sic] on Gov't', raised on a scrolled base, minor faults, the putto's right foot restuck, 30.8cm.

Provenance: with Stockspring Antiques, June 2015.

Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 47
GEORGE II IN MEMORIAM
A tall Worcester porcelain vase, c.1770, the slender baluster body printed in black by Robert Hancock with an equestrian portrait of George II above trophies of war, flanked by large and small versions of 'Les Garçons Chinois' and prints of ships at sail, signed 'RH Worcester' with anchor rebus for Richard Holdship, a few small footrim chips, 27cm.

This equestrian portrait of George II was painted by David Morier in about 1745 following the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, the last occasion on which a reigning British Monarch led troops into battle. Simon Francois Ravenet took an engraving of the painting from which Hancock took this study. Cf. Bonhams, The Norman Stretton Collection, 21st February 2001, lot 71.

Provenance: ex J.A. Harrison and Sir Jeremy Lever collections, sold Bonhams, 7th March 2007, lot 234.

Estimate:  £1000 - 1500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1600
Lot 48
WILLIAM PITT (THE ELDER)
A creamware mug, c.1765, probably Wedgwood, the slight baluster body printed in black with a head and shoulders portrait titled 'The Right Hon. Willm. Pitt Esq' on a scroll banner, with moulded scroll handle, restoration to the rim and foot, 11.1cm.

Pitt was leader of the House from 1757 until his resignation in October 1761; during which time Britain triumphed in the Seven Years War. Returning to power in July 1766, Pitt appointed himself Lord Privy Seal and in so doing was raised on 4th August to the peerage as Earl of Chatham. Cf. David Drakard, Printed English Pottery, p.150, pl.401 where the author attributes these mugs to Wedgwood with the prints by John Sadler, engraved by Billinge.


Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £1500
Lot 49
GEORGE III
A creamware jug, c.1775, the slight baluster body painted in red and black by David Rhodes of Leeds with a profile of George III looking to dexter, the reverse with a floral spray, with grooved double strap handle issuing from floral terminals, a rim crack, the spout restored, 16.8cm.

Cf. Christie's, 7th May 1999, lot 524 for a mug with similar decoration.

Estimate:  £600 - 1000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £2500
Lot 50
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
A Wedgwood jasperware oval portrait plaque, late 18th/19th century, applied in white with a head and shoulders profile on a blue ground, velvet overmount within a glazed polished wood frame, 21.2cm.

Cf. Reilly & Savage, Wedgwood: the Portrait Medallions, p.96, plate c where the authors note that this version was re-modelled by Hackwood in 1776.

Estimate:  £300 - 400 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
Sold for:   £350
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